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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Seals are believed to have evolved from land-based bear or otter-like ancestors, who then decided life was better under the sea, down where it’s wetter..

2) Seals mainly live in the water and only come ashore to mate, give birth, moult or escape from predators such as orca, whales and sharks.

3) Seals have more blood in their body than other animals, which helps them to dive for much longer than many other oxygen-breathing mammals.

4) Elephant seals can hold their breath for two hours – a record in the animal world! The longest ever held by a human is just 22 minutes.

5) Weddell seals can dive to over 600m!

6) Seals have whiskers that help them detect the vibration of their prey underwater.

7) As they can spend many months at sea at a time, seals have the ability to sleep underwater.

8) Male seals don’t eat anything during mating season, which can last up to three months! That’s some serious beach-body dieting.

9) A female seal’s milk contains up to 50% fat, and pups can put on 2kgs a DAY. That should make you feel a little better about your festive calorie splurges!

10) While orcas, sharks and polar bears are natural predators of seals, the biggest threat to seal populations is people.

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Northern gannets are the largest gannet subspecies, and also the largest seabird in Britain.

2) Scotland is home to over 40% of the world’s northern gannet breeding population.

3) If you’re lucky enough to see gannets travelling out to sea you’ll notice that they do so in large groups, sometimes up to 1,000 birds strong – a seabird squadron!

4) Seabirds have to be light enough to soar in the sky for long stretches of time and buoyant enough to float when they rest on the ocean’s surface. Some seabirds are so light and buoyant that they actually have trouble getting under the water at all!

5) Gannets are champions among the divers and can plummet into the ocean from as high as 40m, diving as deep as 35m.

6) When these seabirds hit the surface of the water they can be travelling as fast as 96km/h!

7) Air sacs between the sternum (chest bone) and chest muscles help to cushion the impact of fast diving.

8) They have nostrils that open inside, not outside, their bill to prevent water rushing up their nose when they dive.

9) Gannets don’t take off with their catch, they quickly swallow their fish before resurfacing, often whole. Greedy guts!

10) During the breeding season, gannets increase blood flow to their feet, helping them to incubate their eggs. The feet act like little hot plates to keep the eggs nice and toasty.

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) There are different types of plankton – phytoplankton (tiny plants) rely on the sun for photosynthesis, while zooplankton (tiny animals) feed on phytoplankton.

2) Phytoplankton are an essential component of life on Earth for both marine- and land-living creatures as they are responsible for producing up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe!

3) Plankton are unable to swim against currents, tides, or waves.

4) The word ‘plankton’ derives from the Greek word ‘planktos’, meaning wanderer or drifter.

5) Jellyfish are a technically a type of plankton.

6) During their larval stage, all fish are plankton.

7) Plankton can live in freshwater ponds and lakes as well as being found on every ocean on the planet.

8) Bacteria are the only organisms more abundant than plankton.

9) There are so many plankton in the ocean that if you added them all together, they’d outweigh every sea animal!

10) The famous White Cliffs of Dover are actually made up of millions and millions of fossilised plankton.

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Sorry if this ruins many of the Christmas cards that you see from now on, but no penguins live at the North Pole.

2) Penguins swallow pebbles and stones as well as their food. Scientists believe that the stones may help grind up and digest their food.

3) Penguins can drink seawater, despite its heavy salt content.

4) The characteristic black and white plumage of penguins serves as camouflage while swimming. The black plumage on their back is hard to see from above, while the white plumage on their front looks like the sun reflecting off the surface of the water when seen from below, making them masters of disguise.

5) The fastest species is the gentoo penguin, which can reach swimming speeds up to 35km/h! To put that in to perspective, Michael Phelps swims at about 9.6km/h.

6) Little penguins are the smallest penguin subspecies, averaging around 33cm in height.

7) Unlike most birds which lose and replace a few feathers at a time, penguins moult all at once, in what is called a ‘catastrophic moult’, during which time they remain on land.

8) Because many male penguins incubate eggs, pudgy males – with enough fat storage to survive weeks without eating – are most desirable. Bring on the Dad bod!

9) Penguins can dive to depths of over 250m, although the deepest dive ever recorded was by a female emperor penguin who dived to 535m!

10) Climate change is likely to affect the numbers of krill, and thus affect the penguin numbers as well. Since the 1970s, krill density in some areas has decreased by 80%. When the bottom of the food chain is wiped out, it is seriously bad news for everyone else.

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Marine iguanas are only found on the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, and are the only marine lizards on Earth.

2) Despite looking like a miniature dinosaur with razor-sharp teeth, the marine iguana is actually a gentle herbivore.

3) Charles Darwin described them as “hideous-looking” and “most disgusting, clumsy lizards”.  Pretty judgmental for hairless bearded ape sailing a boat.

4) When it eats, it swallows saltwater and will sneeze numerous times to get rid of the salt.

5) It can dive to 20m, deeper than most SCUBA divers go!

6) Male marine iguanas sometimes swim between islands to mate, which explains why there is just one species of marine iguana compared with the variety of other Galapagos creatures who remain on their own island throughout their whole life.

7) The female marine iguana is only able to mate for just three weeks per year.

8) A cold-blooded reptile, it must lay around in the sun all day to warm itself up. It needs the sun’s warmth to keep its body temperature up, helping it to digest food.

9) Marine iguanas are normally black or dark grey which helps them absorb the heat from the sun.

10) Marine iguanas love mockingbirds because they hate Galapagos hawks – a predator of iguanas. When Galapagos hawks are on the hunt, mockingbirds let out a distinctive cry, alerting the iguanas to their whereabouts. The enemy of my enemy is my friend!

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