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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Apr 17

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Apr 10, 2015

Elephant mother and calf reunite after 3 years apart

Indian-elephant-cow-and-calf

Indian elephant cow and calf

MeBai, a female Asian elephant, was just three years old when she was separated from her mother to enter the tourism industry. Three years later, however, MeBai has been reunited with her mother Mae Yui, with plans to rehabilitate and release them into the wild.

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Article originally published on Saturday, Apr 11, 2015

Cat-eating Nile lizards targeted in Florida

Nile-monitor-head-detail

Nile monitor

Florida state wildlife officials have said that Nile monitors can be dangerous to pets and people. Officials are asking residents to report any sightings. Nile monitors join the Burmese python and lionfish as invasive species residing in Florida.

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burmese-python

Burmese python

Article originally published on Sunday, Apr 12, 2015

The last male northern white rhino must now be kept under armed guard 24/7

Male-northern-white-rhinoceros

Male northern white rhinoceros

Sudan, the last remaining male northern white rhino, is being cared for at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya along with two females. Including two other females in captivity, there now remains only 5 individuals of this white rhinoceros subspecies.

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Article originally published on Monday, Apr 13, 2015

Hope for world’s zaniest fish

Smalltooth-sawfish-in-shallow-water

Smalltooth sawfish in shallow water

Researchers discovered that smalltooth sawfish spend most of their time in a subtropical Florida bay near the coast. The next step involves understanding the behavior the sawfish exhibit in this environment.

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Article originally published on Tuesday, Apr 14, 2015

Rare Omura’s whale washes up in Australia

Fin-whale

Fin whale

This is only the second sighting of an Omura’s whale in Australia, and one of the few sightings globally. There is no population estimate for this species and little is known about its ecology or reproductive biology. This species is often incorrectly identified as a fin whale.

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Article originally published on Wednesday, Apr 15, 2015

Iowa State anthropologist finds female chimps more likely to use tools when hunting

Female-chimpanzee-with-infants

Female chimpanzee with infants

At a research site in Fongoli, Senegal it appears that female chimpanzees are more likely to use tools to hunt, but only at this site. The underlying reason seems to be that dominant males allow females and low-ranking males to keep their prey as opposed to taking it from them as is observed in other sites.

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Article originally published on Thursday, Apr 16, 2015

100 volunteers fail to rescue a beached whale shark after hours of struggling

Whale-shark-filter-feeding-surrounded-by-other-smaller-fish

Whale shark filter feeding

On Monday, a whale shark washed up on a beach in Ecuador. Volunteers attempted to return the whale to the water, but were unsuccessful. Whale sharks are currently listed as vulnerable and are known for being quite docile.

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Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

 

Apr 10

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Apr 3, 2015

‘Lazy’ sea lion sons rely on mothers milk while diligent daughters learn to hunt

Galapagos-sea-lion-pup

Galapagos sea lion pup

For the first two years of their life, male Galapagos sea lions barely make any effort to hunt. Meanwhile, many young females hunt at sea even before their mothers wean them.

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Article originally published on Saturday, Apr 4, 2015

How do hummingbirds fly in wind and rain?

Ruby-throated-hummingbird-male-feeding-on-kalanchoe-flower

Ruby-throated hummingbird male feeding on flower

Researchers placed hummingbirds within a wind tunnel to observe their response to different wind speeds. They twist their bodies to accommodate the airflow which expends more energy, but allows them to continue flying in place.

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Article originally published on Sunday, Apr 5, 2015

Florida wildlife officials ask people not to ‘help’ gopher tortoises

Gopher-tortoise-in-burrow-entrance

Gopher tortoise in burrow entrance

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Department urged people to not help gopher tortoise hatchlings to the ocean, since they cannot swim.  The announcement was made after three instances occurred of people trying to help.  The public was reminded that not all turtle species can swim.

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Article originally published on Monday, Apr 6, 2015

Aceh’s purge of illegal oil palm at 3,000 hectares and counting

Young-Bengal-tiger

Young Bengal tiger

Oil palm plantations are being removed to protect the people from ecological disaster. The plantations lie within the protected Leuser Ecosystem (KEL), the last place where the Sumatran rhino, elephant, tiger, and orangutan coexist in the wild.

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Indian-elephant-bull

Indian elephant bull

Article originally published on Tuesday, Apr 7, 2015

Overfishing leads to crashes in sardines and other forage fish

Pacific-sardine

Pacific sardine

Forage fish are essential food for bigger predators thus playing a vital role within the ecosystem. U.S. fisheries managers are deciding whether to shut down fishing for Pacific sardines since stocks are declining.

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Article originally published on Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015

The truth about magpies

Magpie-stealing-Partridge-egg

Magpie stealing partridge egg

Magpies have a notorious reputation for being thieves of shiny baubles and preying upon the defenseless chicks and eggs of songbirds.  The reality however, is that they are interested in objects, their shininess is irrelevant. While they may prey on songbirds, there is no evidence to suggest they cause population crashes.

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Article originally published on Thursday, Apr 9, 2015

Farmers urge return of jaguars to protect crops

Female-jaguar-resting-in-vegetation-by-river

Female jaguar resting in vegetation

White-lipped peccaries damage farmers’ crops in Brazil as their populations grow and farmers are considering alternatives to hunting. One option is maintaining well-connected jaguar habitat on their agricultural properties thereby allowing jaguars to naturally control peccary populations.

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White-lipped-peccaries-caught-on-camera-trap

White-lipped peccaries caught on camera trap

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

Apr 3

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Mar 27, 2015

New species of monitor lizards found on the black market

varanus-bitatawa

Northern Sierra Madre forest monitor

In a black market in Manila, researchers discovered two new monitor lizard species for sale. They obtained the lizards and took them back to the United States for genetic analysis.

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Article originally published on Saturday, Mar 28, 2015

Malawi to burn its £5m ivory stockpile this week – and demonstrate its commitment to wildlife conservation

African-elephant-family

African elephant family

On Thursday (Apr.2), Malawi President Peter Mutharika will lead the march to the incineration of the country’s ivory stockpile. In purely commercial terms a live elephant is worth 75 times more than a dead one.

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Article originally published on Sunday, Mar 29, 2015

Injured tortoise given 3D printed shell

Burmese-starred-tortoise

Burmese starred tortoise

An injured female leopard turtle has been given a prosthetic shell to protect her as she heals. With a healthy diet and optimum temperature, the shell is expected to regrow properly. She belongs to the Testudinidae family that includes the equally stunning Burmese starred tortoise.

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Article originally published on Monday, Mar 30, 2015

Sexy male birds ‘make worse dads’

Male-blue-and-yellow-tanager-perched-on-branch

Blue-and-yellow tanager perched on branch

Among male blue-black grassquits, who  belong to the tanager family Thraupidae, those with more striking coloration provided less food to their offspring when compared to less ornamented males. Attractive males tend to pursue extra pair copulation.

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Article originally published on Tuesday, Mar 31, 2015

New Report: Five years after Deepwater Horizon, wildlife still struggling

Pair-of-bottlenose-dolphins-breaching

Pair of bottlenose dolphins breaching

Species are still feeling the effects of the Deepwater Horizon event. In 2014, dolphins on the Louisiana coast, were found dead at four times the historic rate which is connected to the oil spill. After the spill, the number of Kemp’s ridley turtle nests has on average declined.

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kemps-ridley-turtle

Kemp’s ridley turtle

Article originally published on Wednesday, Apr 1, 2015

Warm spring helps endangered butterfly’s numbers soar

High-brown-fritillary-feeding-on-marsh-thistle (1)

High brown fritillary feeding on marsh thistle

The high brown fritillary is one of the UK’s rarest butterflies. Since the 1950’s the butterflies numbers have fallen dramatically. In 2014, however its population increased by more than 180% compared to the previous year.

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Article originally published on Thursday, Apr 2, 2015

Tarantulas’ movements get a ‘little wonky’ if its too hot

Curlyhair-tarantula

Curlyhair tarantula

A recent study looked at the effect of temperature on the locomotion of tarantulas. Higher temperatures caused their coordination to decrease, while cooler temperatures caused them to slow down.

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 Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

 

Apr 2

Welcome back for part two of our Arkive Atlantic Islands feature series where we celebrate the incredible biodiversity of the South Atlantic islands! Let Arkive melt away the remaining winter snow with these magical tropical paradises of the South Atlantic. These islands have a high degree of endemism –  species that are only found on those islands – as well as biologically rich waters.

Below are some of the marvelous species that inhabit these islands. Enjoy!

Ascension Island

Ascension-spurge

Ascension spurge

Ascension Island was formed from the debris of a now extinct volcano. It is considered to be one of the most isolated islands in the world.The unassuming Ascension Spurge grows on the driest parts of the island on lava fields up to 310 metres above sea level. Its stems contain a thick, poisonous, milky juice that can cause blindness if it comes in contact with the eyes.

Falkland Islands

Falkland-steamerduck-pair-with-ducklings-on-tideline

Falkland steamerduck pair with ducklings on tideline

The Falkland Islands are visited by approximately 227 migratory bird species who remain on the islands throughout the breeding season. The Falkland steamerduck receives its namesake from its habit of using its wings and feet to propel itself across the surface of the water like an old paddle steamer. Unlike most ducks, this species is flightless since its wings are shorter than its body.

Fernando de Noronha

Green-turtle-ventral-view

Green turtle ventral view

The insular Atlantic forest on Fernando de Noronha is the only one of its kind. Green turtles are born with a special hooked ‘egg tooth’ used to break out of the egg, which they later lose. Also, they are named not for the colour of their carapace, but rather for the green colour of their fat.

St Helena

St-Helena-boxwood-flower-close-up-in-abandoned-cultivation

St Helena boxwood flower

St Helena is one of the most remote inhabited islands in the world. The critically endangered St Helena boxwood is a small shrub that smells strongly of tobacco. Erosion is the primary force pushing this endemic species toward extinction.

São Tomé and Príncipe

Sao-Tome-shrew-close-up

São Tomé shrew

São Tomé and Príncipe is Africa’s smallest country and was formed from the accumulation of volcanic debris. The elusive São Tomé shrew is a rarely seen species that appears to be a solitary mammal since they are usually seen alone. This species is tolerant of human activity and has also been found close to human settlements.

Tristan da Cunha

Inaccessible-rail-drying-wings

Inaccessible rail drying wings

The offshore islands of Gough and Inaccessible are considered to be two of the world’s most important breeding grounds for sea birds. The adorable Inaccessible rail holds the title of the smallest flightless bird in the world.  It is most abundant in tussock grassland, further away from cliffs and in the open fern-bush on the plateau.

Now that you know a bit more about the islands, species, and ecosystems of the South Atlantic, ever wonder which island would best match your personality and interest? We wondered that too so we came up with a nifty little quiz that compares your personal interests and personality to unique characteristics of the islands in the Atlantic Ocean.

Would you swim with the southern rockhopper penguins of the Falkland Islands? Or maybe you prefer to scour the rocky shores of São Tomé and Príncipe? 

Islands quiz button copy

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

Mar 31

Arkive officially announces the launch of its Atlantic Islands feature series: North Atlantic Islands and South Atlantic Islands! Through generous foundation support, our team has researched the islands of the North and South Atlantic Ocean, pulling together some of the world’s best imagery and informational factfiles to shine a spotlight on the incredible island ecosystems in this part of the world.

Through a two-part blog series beginning today with the  North Atlantic islands page we highlight some of the most stunning species and habitats from Iceland down to the Bahamas and more. 

Ready to be whisked away to island life? Let’s go!

Stunning Anegada Island, British Virgin Islands

The North Atlantic islands are a diverse group with some of them formed through the movement of tectonic plates and others through accumulation of volcanic material. One of the most unique features of any island is its ability to support endemic species. However, these endemic species often face the dual threat of overfishing and tourism, which leads to urbanization and an alteration of the landscape.

Bahamas

Nassau-grouper-portrait

Nassau grouper

The Bahamian islands are extremely low-lying with an average elevation of only 10 metres.  The mottled Nassau grouper resides in shallow waters near reefs and other rocky substrates. This austere species possesses the unique ability to change its colour pattern to resemble its surrounding environment or as a means of communication.

Bermuda

Bermuda-skink-on-rock

Bermuda skink on rock

Bermuda is made up of 7 main islands and over 140 smaller islands, arranged in a crescent-like formation. The diminutive yet robust Bermuda skink inhabits rocky, coastal area and is the only terrestrial vertebrate endemic to Bermuda. Hatchlings are born with sky blue tails that become brown/black with age.

British Virgin Islands

Virgin-Islands-coqui-on-leaf-lateral-view

Virgin Islands coqui on leaf

The position of the British Virgin Islands makes them extremely vulnerable to hurricanes and other weather events. The Virgin Islands coqui is a stunning little frog that strongly prefers living near terrestrial bromeliads. Males serenade females with two tone calls and will only commence their courtship call when the female approaches.

Canary Islands

Canarian-shrew-on-biologists-hand

Canarian shrew

The Canary Islands is made up of seven islands that include Tenerife, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, Lanzarote, La Palma, La Gomera, Hierro. The lilliputian Canarian shrew resides lava fields with little or no vegetation. This seemingly mild-mannered species uses a neurotoxic venom to immobilize its prey such as the Atlantic lizard.

Cape Verde

Loggerhead-turtle-swimming

Loggerhead turtle swimming

The natural habitats in Cape Verde range from being desert-like and flat to luscious high-elevation forests. The endangered loggerhead turtle prefers coastal water, but may be found in the open ocean as well. These turtles have extremely powerful jaws that can crack the shells of even the queen conch and giant clam.

Cayman Islands

Buffy-flower-bat-hanging-from-ceiling

Buffy flower bat hanging from ceiling

Of the 26 reptiles and amphibian species, 75 percent are endemic and 30 of the 48 freshwater mollusc species are found nowhere else in the world. The enigmatic buffy flower bat has a diet, which consists largely of pollen, but may include nectar and fruit. This sleepyhead is believed to leave its daytime roost later than other bat species.

Cuba

Male-bee-hummingbird-in-breeding-plumage

Male bee hummingbird in breeding plumage

Wetlands are found on around 4 percent of Cuba’s surface providing a habitat for numerous resident marine organisms and many migratory birds. The micro-sized bee hummingbird holds the honor of being the smallest living bird in the world! It can beat its wings 80 times per second and consumes up to 8 times its body mass in water each day.

Iceland

arctic-fox-portrait-winter-coat

Arctic fox, winter coat

Around 11 percent of Iceland is covered by glaciers and 6 percent by rivers and lakes. The pristine Arctic fox is a sturdy critter that can withstand subzero temperatures. It has a short nose to reduce heat loss and increased blood flow to the feet pads to prevent freezing.

Jamaica

Captive-Jamaican-hutia

Jamaican hutia

Jamaica is the third largest island in the Caribbean and is located to the south of Cuba. The Jamaican hutia can be found in mountainous areas of karst formation where extensive networks of tunnels and crevices offer it protection. Hutias give birth to well-developed young that can eat solid foods and move around just 30 hours after its birth.

Madeira

Madeira-pipistrelle-head-detail

Madeira pipistrelle

The word madeira is Portuguese for ‘wood’, referring to the extensive laurel forest that once covered the island. The Madeira pipistrelle is an early riser and among one of the first bats to emerge from its roost in the evening. It uses echolocation to detect its prey and emits calls at a frequency of around 45-47 kHz.

Turks and Caicos Islands

Caicos-Islands-dwarf-boa-subspecies-greenwayi

Caicos Islands dwarf boa

There are 35 protected areas in the Turks and Caicos Islands that include national parks, nature reserves, sanctuaries and areas of historic interest. The miniature Caicos Islands dwarf boa lives up to its name and averages around 38 cm in length! When threatened it coils itself into a tight ball, hides its head, smears a foul-smelling fluid on its coils and exposes its bright yellow tail.

Now that you know a bit more about the islands, species, and ecosystems of the North Atlantic, ever wonder which island would best match your personality and interest? We wondered that too so we came up with a nifty little quiz that compares your personal interests and personality to unique characteristics of the islands in the Atlantic Ocean.

Would you thrive living alongside the puffins of Iceland? Or maybe you prefer to scour the warm, sandy shores of Jamaica? 

Islands quiz button copy

And stay tuned for the second half of this series where we introduce you to the marvelous flora and fauna of the South Atlantic Islands.

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

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