Mar 10

Animals can be incredible masters of disguise. The adaptation of species to avoid detection by predators or prey can trick even the best of us. Luckily these photographers know what to look for!

Do you think you have a keen eye for detail? Are your ‘Where’s Wally’ skills top notch? Then try our next ARKive challenge: can you spot the well camouflaged animals in these photographs?

1. A difficult one to start: Fan coral proves a good hide out for this pygmy seahorse.

Photo of pygmy seahorse camouflaged against fan coral

2. Mottled brown is an excellent camouflage-colour scheme for this nesting female pheasant.

Photo of Reeves's pheasant female on nest

3. Unable to move or defend, blending into the stony surroundings is vital to avoid hungry eyes from above!

Photo of wrybill eggs on nest

4. Is this just another immobile leaf? Or is it a pipefish?

Photo of double ended pipefish camouflaged amongst seagrass

5. This mammal had to change coat colour to pull off this seasonal concealment.

Photo of Arctic hare camouflaged against snow

6. Satanic leaf-tailed gecko. Camouflaged against bark. Cunning.

Photo of a satanic leaf-tailed gecko on tree trunk

7. Orbicular batfish juveniles play dead(-leaves) rather well!

Photo of juvenile orbicular batfish camouflaged amongst leaves

 8. Easily lost in the leaf litter – can you spot the brown chameleon in this photograph?

Photo of brown leaf chameleon amongst leaves

Did any of these species evade your eagle eyes? Let us know if you need any help!

Lauren Pascoe, ARKive Media Researcher

  • Terri (March 10th, 2011 at 6:39 pm):

    6/8

    These were really great!

  • Ally (March 11th, 2011 at 11:01 pm):

    Wonderful evolution!
    I’m afraid I spotted them all though

  • Peter (March 12th, 2011 at 12:45 am):

    Numbers 1-7 are easy 8 not so much

  • Peter (March 12th, 2011 at 12:47 am):

    Numbers 1-7 are easy 8 not yntil i went to the page of the animal

  • logan olsen (April 21st, 2011 at 2:47 am):

    i cant find 3 8 and 7

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