Aug 4

To further celebrate Discovery Channel’s Shark Week, we’ve come up with five great shark videos with five great facts for you.

Great hammerhead (Sphyrna mokarran)

Like some other shark species, the great hammerhead locates prey using an electro-sensory system that detects the weak electric field that all living organisms produce. The bizarre head shape of the hammerhead is thought to increase sensitivity to electronic signals, although a recent study suggests it may enable binocular vision and an impressive 360 degree vision!

Oceanic whitetip (Carcharhinus longimanus)

A formidable predator, the oceanic whitetip shark preys on bony fishes, sea turtles, sea birds, squid and mammalian carcasses to name but a few. At food sources it will dominate other species of shark competing for the same food.

Shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)

The shortfin mako is the fastest shark in the world, able to reach speeds of up to 35 kilometres per hour. It’s thought this is aided by an ability to keep its body temperature warmer than the surrounding seawater – a trait it shares with the great white shark.

Basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus)

At 10 metres long, the basking shark is the second largest shark species, outsized only by the whale shark. This benign giant filter-feeder feeds on zooplankton that it strains through the five massive gill slits as it slowly swims through the water.

Tawny nurse shark (Nebrius ferrugineus)

Most sharks have to keep swimming in order to get water moving through their gills. Unlike most other shark species, nurse sharks are able to pump water through their gills while settled on the ocean floor – this has given them a reputation for being docile and lazy.

There are many, many more shark videos on ARKive so do check them out!

Eleanor Sans, ARKive Media Researcher

  • Dmitri (August 4th, 2011 at 3:19 pm):

    Nice videos! I was impressed!

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