Jan 12

Mammal, fish, amphibian, reptile, plant, coral, insect…the choices are never ending, but will this week’s team member choose a gentle giant like Laura Sutherland or opt for a slightly less substantial species?

George Bradford – ARKive Media Researcher

Favourite Species: Honey badger

Why? I admire the resourcefulness of the honey badger that allows it to exist over a large range and variety of habitats from savannah to rainforest. It can make a meal out of venomous snakes, small mammals and even roots and berries. It has been reported that the honey badger uses its anal gland to fumigate bee hives so it can access the larvae within. That’s street smart.

Favourite honey badger image on ARKive:

Honey badger image

Honey badger with python kill

 

The honey badger is classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List. Its threats include being trapped and snared by poachers and small livestock farmers as well as bee farmers. Its claws are used in traditional medicine to confer the patient with the fearlessness and ferocity characteristic of this species.

See more photos of the honey badger.

  • Doug Norris (January 13th, 2012 at 7:08 am):

    Good choice George. The Honey Badger is one of my favourite African animals; takes no nonsense from “anybody” including much bigger predators.

    From a distance I think they look vaguely like Cheetah cubs. I wonder whether this is a evolutionary “trick” on behalf of cheetahs for the young to look like a “don’t mess with me” animal.

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