Jul 31
Share 'Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children' on Delicious Share 'Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children' on Digg Share 'Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children' on Facebook Share 'Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children' on reddit Share 'Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children' on StumbleUpon Share 'Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children' on Email Share 'Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children' on Print Friendly

Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children

Wildlife photography is a fantastic way to discover nature – using your eyes and a camera to really explore and enjoy the natural world. You can have great fun creating stunning wild images whatever camera you have (SLR, pocket compact camera or mobile phone) and wherever you live.  Often the most exciting discoveries are right on our doorsteps – the highlight of my career was photographing a sleeping kingfisher just a few metres from house (they are unique images as far as I know)!

King of Sleeps JPG

Sleeping kingfisher © Iain Green

Whether you enjoy the artistic side of nature photography, or maybe wish to record the different wildlife and behaviour you see (probably a mixture of both) here are my top tips to help you take great wildlife shots.

 Local sites such as your garden, nearby park, beach or nature reserve offer some of the best opportunities for wildlife photography. By regularly exploring these local wild spaces you can build a detailed photographic study and create unique images. Visit sites at different times of the day and year to determine when wildlife activity is at its peak and where is the best spot to photograph.

• Do as much research as you can about the wildlife & habitats you hope to see – books, internet and wildlife charities are great Young Photographer  IG (P&C)sources. Quiz experts and local reserve staff for wildlife knowledge and advice, they are normally very happy to help.

• Get-up early, or go out late to get the best lighting conditions – especially in summer. If photographing bugs or flowers in middle of the day, use a reflector or piece of white card to bounce sunlight on to the shady side of your subject.

• Slow down and take time to think about your composition. Look for, bold colours, striking patterns or exciting action to create stunning photos. When photographing animals make sure you focus on the eyes. Experiment with composition by moving your subject off-centre and using scene features as natural frames

• Change your viewpoint. Get down low to your subjects eye-level for a better perspective and to portray nature in its own habitat. Don’t forget to look straight up or down to discover beautiful natural patterns in plants and trees. Photographing from below can make things look bigger or more impressive.

• Compact cameras are fantastic for photographing mini-beasts or flowers – don’t use the zoom, but carefully move your camera in close. The macro (flower symbol) setting on pocket cameras enables you to focus on something just a few cm away, creating striking frame-filling images.

• Learn how your camera works and don’t be afraid to experiment with different settings, such as exposure and focussing.

• Above all else get out and photograph, the best photographs are created by spending time outside and not in a camera shop. And be patient with wildlife, you may have to wait or make several visits for that special image.

Vole really close

If you are patient you could get some really great shots like this water vole image © Iain Green

Iain Green is a professional wildlife photographer and founder of www.WildWonder.co.uk, a social enterprise engaging young people, schools and adults with nature through discovery and creativity.

Jul 27
Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Balearic shearwater' on Delicious Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Balearic shearwater' on Digg Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Balearic shearwater' on Facebook Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Balearic shearwater' on reddit Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Balearic shearwater' on StumbleUpon Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Balearic shearwater' on Email Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Balearic shearwater' on Print Friendly

Endangered Species of the Week: Balearic shearwater

Photo of Balearic shearwater in flight

Balearic shearwater (Puffinus mauretanicus)

Species: Balearic shearwater (Puffinus mauretanicus)

Status: Critically Endangered (CR)

Interesting Fact: Like other shearwaters, the Balearic shearwater is named for its ‘shearing’ flight, in which it flies with stiffly held wings just centimetres above the ocean waves.

Considered to be the most threatened seabird in the Mediterranean, the Balearic shearwater is a medium-sized shearwater which breeds only on the Balearic Islands, in the western Mediterranean Sea. This species spends most of its time out at sea, where it dives into the water to catch fish and squid, using its long, sharp beak to capture its slippery prey. The Balearic shearwater returns to land to breed between February and June, and each pair lays a single large egg, usually in a small cave, cavity or under a boulder. Breeding pairs may remain together for many years. At the end of the breeding season, some Balearic shearwaters migrate northwards to winter in the Bay of Biscay, and may reach as far north as the United Kingdom and Scandinavia.

The main threats to the Balearic shearwater include predation by introduced mammals and entanglement in fishing gear. The breeding habitat of this species is threatened by urbanisation and by introduced rabbits, which compete with the birds for nesting sites, and the Balearic shearwater may also be negatively affected by pollution, oil spills and a reduction in prey abundance. As part of a recovery plan in place for the Balearic shearwater, rats have been eradicated from a number of breeding sites and a number of protected areas have been created. Studies into the species’ biology and populations are also being carried out. Efforts are underway to assess the problem of bycatch in fisheries, and awareness campaigns, together with mitigation measures, will be important in addressing this threat.

Find out more about seabird conservation at the BirdLife International Global Seabird Programme.

You can also read more about UK marine species in our National Marine Week guest blog.

See images of the Balearic shearwater on ARKive.

Liz Shaw, ARKive Text Author

Jul 27
Share 'Guest Blog – National Marine Week 2013' on Delicious Share 'Guest Blog – National Marine Week 2013' on Digg Share 'Guest Blog – National Marine Week 2013' on Facebook Share 'Guest Blog – National Marine Week 2013' on reddit Share 'Guest Blog – National Marine Week 2013' on StumbleUpon Share 'Guest Blog – National Marine Week 2013' on Email Share 'Guest Blog – National Marine Week 2013' on Print Friendly

Guest Blog – National Marine Week 2013

The UK has been experiencing some uncharacteristically hot weather over the last few weeks, so what better time to get out to our beautiful coast? Take this opportunity to find out more about the fantastic diversity of species and habitats we have off our shores, and join in The Wildlife Trusts’ annual National Marine Week! This celebration of all things marine actually runs for more than two weeks, from Saturday 27 July to Sunday 11 August, to make the most of the tides.

Velvet swimming crab image

Velvet swimming crab

We are fortunate in the UK to have an awe-inspiring range of habitats and species around our coasts. From shallow seagrass meadows and kelp forests to gullies and canyons over 2,000 metres deep, these habitats provide homes and feeding grounds for countless species, including colourful sea slugs, charismatic fish such as the tompot blenny, and the bottlenose dolphin, one of 11 species of whale, dolphin and porpoise regularly seen in our waters! Our seas are also home to the second largest fish in the world, the basking shark. This gentle giant can be spotted in the summer as it comes close to the shore, filter feeding micro-organisms.

Basking shark image

Basking shark

All around our coasts, Wildlife Trusts staff and volunteers will be sharing their knowledge, so whether you want to find out more about minke whales or molluscs, velvet swimming crabs or strawberry anemones, breadcrumb sponges or butterfish, and seals or seabirds, there will be events where people can enjoy the sights, sounds and smells of the sea and learn more about its riches.

The Wildlife Trusts hold these events to showcase some of the UK’s marine wildlife, and to educate and enthuse people about this fantastic resource on our doorstep. As well as being a source of wonder, our seas are also a playground, a food supply, a conduit for our imports and exports, and a climate regulator that absorbs vast quantities of greenhouse gases while releasing the oxygen we breathe. We are an island nation, and the sea is a vital part of our national identity.

Jewel anemone image

Jewel anemones

However, the seas are not as productive as they once were. For years, we have taken too much with too little care. Our seas’ resources are not inexhaustible, and their ability to cope with the pressures we put on them – damage from fishing, industrial pollution and the impacts of a changing climate – is limited. Much of our marine wildlife is in decline. Two species of whale and dolphin have become extinct in UK waters in the last 400 years, and basking shark numbers have declined by 95%. Commercial species are also under pressure, and in 2009 the EU Commission declared that 88% of marine fish stocks were overexploited.

Grey seal image

Grey seal

In order to provide better protection for our marine environment, here at The Wildlife Trusts we are campaigning for an ecologically coherent network of Marine Protected Areas – areas that offer protection not just to our most rare and vulnerable species, but to the full range of species and habitats found in the seas.

These areas will protect marine life within their boundaries, and with careful management they can also have an influence beyond these boundaries, as burgeoning populations spill out into the surrounding sea. A well-designed and effectively managed network will help boost the health of the marine environment as a whole, helping it to recover from past impacts and sustain current pressures. Although we have made a start on our network, we still have a long way to go, and at the moment progress towards achieving the network is slow.

The Wildlife Trusts’ National Marine Week and our events provide us with a crucial opportunity to highlight the need to continue to put pressure on UK Governments to ensure that this vital ambition is achieved. It offers countless opportunities for people to savour the seaside and find out so much more about what our coasts have to offer. Why not head over to The Wildlife Trusts’ marine wildlife weeks page to find an event near you!

Ali Plummer, Living Seas Officer for The Wildlife Trusts

Jul 24
Share 'In the News: Snow leopard under threat from cashmere trade' on Delicious Share 'In the News: Snow leopard under threat from cashmere trade' on Digg Share 'In the News: Snow leopard under threat from cashmere trade' on Facebook Share 'In the News: Snow leopard under threat from cashmere trade' on reddit Share 'In the News: Snow leopard under threat from cashmere trade' on StumbleUpon Share 'In the News: Snow leopard under threat from cashmere trade' on Email Share 'In the News: Snow leopard under threat from cashmere trade' on Print Friendly

In the News: Snow leopard under threat from cashmere trade

A rising global demand for cashmere is putting the snow leopard and other native wildlife in Central Asia under threat, according to a new study.

Photo of wild snow leopard in stalking pose

The snow leopard is classified as Endangered on the IUCN Red List

Domestic cashmere goats are raised in many parts of Central Asia for their luxurious fur coats. Although cashmere production is not new, the global demand for this product has increased dramatically, and goat numbers have almost tripled in some areas in the last 20 years.

The new study, published in the journal Conservation Biology, reports that the increasing goat population is encroaching on the habitat of the snow leopard and its prey. Nearly all the forage across the Tibetan plateau, Mongolia and northern India is now being consumed by goats, sheep and other livestock, leaving only tiny amounts for native herbivores such as the Tibetan antelope, saiga, wild yak and Przewalski’s horse.

Photo of Przewalski's horses in habitat

Goats are also competing with native herbivores such as Przewalski’s horse

A decline in these native prey species can lead snow leopards to hunt goats, so leading to increased conflict with humans as people seek to protect their herds. Other threats to native species include disease transfer from livestock and the killing of wild animals by herders’ dogs.

Green labelling

Cashmere production is an important source of income for many local communities in Central Asia.

According to Dr Charudutt Mishra of the Snow Leopard Trust, “Cashmere production is a complicated human issue. Understandably, indigenous herders are trying to improve their livelihoods, but the short-term economic gain is harming the local ecosystem.”

Photo of snow leopard female and juvenile

Snow leopards prey mainly on wild sheep and goats, but will take livestock if wild prey has been depleted

Dr Mishra suggests that ‘green labelling’ of cashmere clothes could help increase awareness of the issue among consumers. “One of the intentions is to bring together some of the local communities who produce cashmere and the buyers from the international market. We want to address everyone’s concerns and develop a programme where we can make grazing more sustainable, and that allows for wild and domestic animals to co-exist,” he said.

According to Dr Mishra and the other authors of the study, the iconic species of the region’s mountains and steppes will become victims of fashion unless action is taken on both a global and a local scale.

 

Read more on this story at BBC News – Cashmere trade threat to snow leopards and The Guardian – Snow leopards and wild yaks becoming ‘fashion victims’.

View more images and videos of the snow leopard on ARKive.

Liz Shaw, ARKive Text Author

Jul 23
Share 'Guest blog: ARKive in the Australian classroom by Barbara Sing' on Delicious Share 'Guest blog: ARKive in the Australian classroom by Barbara Sing' on Digg Share 'Guest blog: ARKive in the Australian classroom by Barbara Sing' on Facebook Share 'Guest blog: ARKive in the Australian classroom by Barbara Sing' on reddit Share 'Guest blog: ARKive in the Australian classroom by Barbara Sing' on StumbleUpon Share 'Guest blog: ARKive in the Australian classroom by Barbara Sing' on Email Share 'Guest blog: ARKive in the Australian classroom by Barbara Sing' on Print Friendly

Guest blog: ARKive in the Australian classroom by Barbara Sing

As a Primary Teacher in the Kimberley I have utilised ARKive’s resources over several years as the content is engaging and relevant to the knowledge base of my students; 77% of whom are Aboriginal from many different language groups across the Kimberley; an area three times the size of the UK.

I thought I would share a couple of examples of how I have used ARKive education resources and how they have worked for me and my students.

Keys and classification

Identification keys – sharks and raysWith the implementation of The Australian Curriculum I have found ARKive’s classification resources specifically meet the Year 7 Biological Science content descriptor ACSSU111 which states “There are differences within and between groups of organisms; classification helps organise this diversity” (ACARA).

My students particularly enjoy the ‘Sharks and Rays Identification’ activities as our community is located on the edge of a crocodile infested tidal mangrove habitat and most students engage in recreational fishing and hunting activities. Students of all abilities are able to navigate the identification keys easily and the accompanying presentations on shark and ray identification and classification resources make the lesson preparation seamless. The other activities provided engage students over a series of lessons and I normally conclude the unit by getting my students out of the classroom with a visit to a Munkayarra Wetland. During the visit students use an identification key similar to the ARKive keys to identify macro invertebrates they collected.

Students using classification keys at Munkayarra Wetland © Barbara Sing

Students using classification keys at Munkayarra Wetlands

Human Impacts on the Environment

Human Impacts on the Environment education resourcesAlthough my students have some idea of the impact of plastic in the marine environment the ‘Human Impacts on the Environment’ resource was certainly an eye opener for many of them. The module explores the different ways humans can have negative impacts on the environment and endangered species. I recommend it highly as a resource for Sustainability, Science as a Human Endeavour and also Chemical Science.

Spreading the word

I easily keep up to date with new resources through the ARKive facebook page and share the resources with other teachers and environmental groups.

Thanks for providing a growing useable resource for teachers globally!

Barbara Sing Derby District High School (K-12), West Kimberley, Western Australia

About

RSS feedARKive.org is the place for films, photos and facts about endangered species. Subscribe to our blog today to keep up to date!

Email updates

Sign up to receive a regular email digest of ARKive blog posts.
Preferred frequency:

ARKive twitter

Twitter: ARKive