Jan 30

Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week. Enjoy!

 

The following articles were originally published on Monday, January 26, 2015

Palm oil may be single most immediate threat to the greatest number of species

Bornean orangutan photo

Bornean orangutan infant hanging from tree

Palm oil production drives the conversion of ecosystems such as rainforest and peatlands into plantations which reduces biological diversity. Many species in South East Asia are affected by palm oil production such as the charismatic orangutan.

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Giant pandas don’t know their own faces

Infant giant panda, portrait

Apparently, giant pandas do not recognize themselves in a mirror. When confronted with their own image they reacted by showing defensive behavior.

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The following articles were originally published on Tuesday, January 27, 2015.

How Ebola is killing the world’s ape population and what we can do to stop it

Juvenile eastern chimpanzee in tree

Western lowland gorilla silverback

 

The Ebola virus affects not only humans, but chimpanzees and gorillas as well. There appears to be a legitimate link between the increase of deforestation and the frequency of outbreaks.

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President Obama Protects Untouched Marine Wilderness in Alaska

Portrait of bearded seal, head coloured by sediment

Bowhead whale surfacing

Atlantic walrus portrait

President Obama has declared 9.8 million acres in the wateroff of Alaska’s coast as off-limits to consideration for future oil and gas leasing. These waters are home to  bowhead whales walruses, and bearded seals.

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The following articles were originally published on Wednesday, January 28.

Rare Sierra Nevada Red Fox Sighted In Yosemite National Park

Red fox in snow, side profile

Yosemite National park officials spotted a Sierra Nevada red fox in the park for the first time in almost 100 years. This subspecies of the red fox is extremely rare with less than 50 individuals believed to be in existence.

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With local help, hawksbill sea turtles make a comeback in Nicaragua

Front on view of a hawksbill turtle

Hawksbill turtles have shown a 200 percent increase from 154 nests to 468 nests in the last 14 years. Poaching rates in Nicaragua’s Pearl Cays have decreased by more than 80 percent.

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The following articles were originally published on  Thursday, January 29 .

Scientists discover that fish larvae make sounds

Five-lined snapper shoal

Researchers found that the larvae of grey snapper produce sound though at this time it is unclear as to the purpose of these sounds. Snapper are a large diverse group that includes the vibrantly colored five-lined snapper.

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Mysterious megamouth shark washes ashore in the Philippines

Megamouth shark

A 15 foot adult male megamouth shark washed up on the shores of Barangay Marigondon in the Philippines on Wednesday. There are only 64 confirmed sightings of this mysterious and elusive shark.

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Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

Jan 1

As we say goodbye to 2014, we say hello to 2015 and what’s more traditional than ringing in the New Year with some beautiful babies! We’ve set ourselves to the difficult task of identifying some of the cutest and most interesting wildlife babies to get us off to a fresh start on January 1.

After a look at this list, we bet you’ll be looking forward to a happy (and maybe even cuddly) new year!

Bundles of joy

Ten day old brown bears

At ten days old, these brown bears hardly resemble the large furry adults they will one day become. Brown bears usually have litters of one to four cubs with cubs reaching maturity at four to six years of age.

Hey everyone look right

Group of ostrich chicks

These fluffy  and speckled ostrich chicks look very different from the black and white adults they all aspire to become. While ostriches lay some of the largest eggs among birds, they also hold the distinct honor of being the fastest running bird at an astonishing 43 mph.

Cute as a button

Harp seal pup

The angelic harp seal pup is distinguished by its white and pristine fur that differentiates it from the silvery-grey color of the adult. The pups white fur becomes whiter during their first two weeks, but they molt soon after and develop the silvery-grey of adults.

I present, the (tiny) emperor

Emperor newt tadpole

This tiny tadpole is actually the dignified emperor newt, which develops orange and black coloration when it reaches adulthood. Females usually lay between 80 and 240 eggs with eggs hatching after 15 to 40 days.

What’s up?

Southern cassowary chick

The small chick of the Southern cassowary looks nothing like the imposing adult that has a helmet of tough skin on its head. Eggs are incubated for around 50 days and may require parental care for up to 16 months.

Two is better than one

Kemp’s ridley turtle hatchlings

The critically endangered Kemp’s ridley turtle is one of the smallest marine turtles with adults weighing less than 100 pounds. Hatchlings are grey-black all over compared to the grey-olive adults. About 90 eggs are lain per clutch, with two to three clutches lain a year.

What’s black and yellow all over?

Corroboree frog froglets

The corroboree frog is a small frog whose defining characteristics are the lack of webbed toes and their visually stunning black and yellow coloration. Females lay around 26 eggs with tadpoles remaining in their protective egg for up to 7 months.

Just hanging out

Amur leopard cub

This is one extreme feline, since the Amur leopard resides in the frigid landscapes of the Russian Far East. These wonderful big cats have a thick fur that can grow up 7cm during winter and are among one of the rarest leopard subspecies.

Look into my eyes

dwarf crocodile photo

Infant dwarf crocodile

The pint-sized dwarf crocodile are the smallest of the bunch with adults rarely reaching 5 feet in length. Females usually lay 10 eggs per clutch and take 100 days to incubate! Young crocodiles are about 28 cm when they hatch.

Did we capture you favorite babies from the animal kingdom? If not, feel free to share your favorite Arkive baby pictures in the comments below!

Happy New Year from the Arkive Team to you!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

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