Feb 20

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News  ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Feb 13, 2015

Male black widows smell hungry cannibal females

Black-widow-female-showing-distinctive-red-egg-timer-shaped-markings-on-abdomen

Female black widow

Female black widows only eat courting males about 2% of the time. However, just in case, males can smell how peckish a female is just from the pheromones in her silk.

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  Article originally published on Saturday, Feb 14, 2015

 Wildlife: Southwest wolf populations tops 100 for first time in modern era

Mexican-wolf-portrait

Mexican wolf portrait

The Mexican wolf population in New Mexico and Arizona has grown by 31% to  109 individuals total.

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  Article originally published on Sunday, Feb 15, 2015

 Increasing number of stranded sea lion pups being rescued this year

Female-California-sea-lion-on-rock

Female sea lion

So far 185 sea lion pups have been rescued in 2015 in the San Diego area. Stranded pups are nursed back to health and once healthy released into the wild.

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   Article originally published on Monday, Feb 16, 2015

 Cold-blooded animals grow bigger in the warm on land, but smaller in warm water

Velvet-swimming-crab

Velvet swimming crab

Arthropods like crabs and insects, grow larger on land in warmer climates. Moreover, researchers hypothesize that reduced oxygen availability in water causes aquatic animals to reduce their body size more.

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Golden-ringed-dragonfly

Golden-ringed dragonfly

 Article originally published on Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015

 42 pangolins rescued…then sold to restaurant

Sunda-pangolin-side-view

Sunda pangolin

On Feb. 1, local Vietnamese police seized 42 live Sunda pangolins from poachers. Police handed them over to forest rangers who in turn ended up selling them to restaurants for a reported $56 a kilo.

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  Article originally published on Wednesday, Feb 18, 2015

Grizzly bears are waking up too early

Brown-bear-walking-Alaskan-population

Brown bear walking

Grizzly bears are emerging from their dens a month early according to Yellowstone Park officials. The warmer weather appears to be the reason for the grizzlies’ altered schedule.

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  Article originally published on Thursday, Feb 19, 2015

Great white sharks are late bloomers

Great-white-shark-swimming-anterior-view

Great white shark swimming

Male great white sharks take 26 years to reach sexual maturity. This differs significantly from the previous estimate that suggested that males reached maturity between 4 and 10 years of age.

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 Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA