Feb 6

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

The following article was originally published on Friday, Jan 30, 2015.

Successful strawberry frog dads die young

Strawberry poison frog, side profile

Researchers have found that male strawberry poison frogs who raise more offspring have a reduced longevity. They believe that the direct involvement in raising clutches contributes to a shorter lifespan.

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 The following article was originally published on Saturday, Jan 31, 2015.

Whales hear through their bones, San Diego study finds

Southern right whale

The skulls of at least some baleen whales have acoustic properties that capture the energy of low frequencies and direct it to their ear bones. These findings might help legislators decide on limits to oceanic man-made noise.

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 The following article was originally published on Sunday, Feb 1, 2015.

Planting drone to fight deforestation

Collecting seeds of a native tree species for reforestation

The first step is for the a drone to gather mapping data for areas chosen for reforestation. The second step is for the “planting” drone to propel biodegradable seedpods to the ground, which contains germinated seeds and necessary nutrients

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The following article was originally published on  Monday, Feb 2, 2015.

Sometimes, protecting one species harms another

Humphead parrotfish

The humphead parrotfish is considered a vulnerable species that must be protected. However, they thrive in abundance at Palmyra Atoll where they consume dangerously large amounts of coral. It poses the question of how to protect both species.

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The following article was originally published on Tuesday, Feb 3, 2015.

Bringing rhinos back to Uganda, one calf at a time

Southern white rhinoceros

Rhinos were completely wiped out in Uganda by 1982. In 2005, however, six southern white rhinos were introduced to the Zhiwa Rhino Sanctuary. There are now fifteen rhinos.

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The following article was originally published on Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015.

Tiger populations in Nepal can’t grow without more food and space

Bengal tiger portrait

Nepal has set a goal of having at least 250 Bengal tigers within its borders by 2022. Anti-poaching efforts, however, may not be enough since a recent study suggests that the tigers in Nepal lack the food and space to allow further population growth.

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The following article was originally published on Thursday, Feb 5, 2015.

Rare pink pigeons baffled by ‘signal-jamming’ doves

Pink pigeon side profile

A new study found that pink pigeons mistake the calls of Madagascan turtle doves for rival male pink pigeons. Their mistake causes them to waste energy and may be one the reasons pink pigeons have failed to recolonize more of Mauritius.

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA