Jun 26

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Jun 19, 2015

Hawk-moths are capable of slowing their brains to stay in rhythm with their environment

Oleander-hawk-moth-on-oleander-flowers

Oleander hawk-moth on oleander flowers

Hawk moths can slow parts of their brain in order to adjust to changes in their environment. They operate with slower visual processing in low light conditions.

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Article originally published on Saturday, Jun 20, 2015

North American ‘ghost cat’ extinct, Fish and Wildlife Service states

Puma-swimming

Puma swimming

The eastern cougar was last seen in the 1930s, and had been placed on the endangered species list in 1973. In 2011, this subspecies of the cougar was listed as extinct. The Fish and Wildlife Service has now officially declared the eastern cougar extinct.

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Article originally published on Sunday, Jun 21, 2015

Protest over video showing men ‘surfing’ on top of whale shark

Whale-shark

Whale shark

An online video has surfaced of two men surfing on a whale shark. The Marine Conservation Institute has condemned the act as ‘unacceptable’. Meanwhile the Marine Connection has called for these men to be ‘brought to justice’.

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Article originally published on Monday, Jun 22, 2015

Wolves, monkeys: Hunting allies in Ethiopia

Ethiopian-wolf-yawning

Ethiopian wolf yawning

Apparently, Ethiopian wolves are more successful at catching their prey (i.e. rodents) when they are with the geladas. Researchers hypothesize that these monkey herds flush out the rodents or the rodents do not notice the wolves when the monkeys are present.

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Male-gelada

Male gelada

Article originally published on Tuesday, Jun 23, 2015

Cat update: Lion and African golden cat down, Iberian lynx up

Iberian-lynx-at-rest

Iberian lynx at rest

The West African lion has been declared critically endangered with only 121-375 mature lions remaining. Meanwhile, the African golden cat has been moved from near threatened to vulnerable primarily due to deforestation and poaching.  On a more positive note, the Iberian lynx is no longer critically endangered and is now only endangered with 156 mature lynx roaming Spain and Portugal.

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African-golden-cat-female

African golden cat female

Article originally published on Wednesday, Jun 24, 2015

New species: Hairy-chested yeti crab found in Antarctica

Shore-crab-dorsal-view

Shore crab

A new species of yeti crab has been discovered in the waters off Antarctica and is only the third known species of yeti crab. In order to survive at these frigid temperatures, this new species congregates around hydrothermal vents in tight clusters with other conspecifics. It belongs to the diverse order Decapoda that includes the colorful shore crab.

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Article originally published on Thursday, Jun 25, 2015

Inside the fight to stop giraffes’ ‘silent extinction’

Adult-and-juvenile-west-African-giraffe

Adult and juvenile west African giraffe

Over the past 15 years the giraffe’s population has dropped from about 140,000 to 80,000. Habitat loss and poaching are the main threats to giraffes. There is only one species of giraffe in the world.

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Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA