Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Malabar civet

Nominated by: IUCN Small Carnivore Specialist Group

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? Typically small carnivores do not get the media attention of their larger relatives (lions and tigers and bears…uh-hum). The IUCN Small Carnivore Specialist Group (SCSG) feels that the Malabar Civet has great potential for stardom – it is furry and has spots and whiskers, but is almost extinct with fewer than 250 estimated in the wild. This is one of many in the “last chance to see” category….

What are the threats to the Malabar civet? Habitat loss and degradation. There is a lack of any recent records and native habitat is almost entirely gone already. It does not occur in any protected areas and thus has no safe guard – and will surely face extinction in the near future if trends are not corrected.

What are you doing to save it? The IUCN SCSG attempts to bring awareness to plight of many small carnivore species, many of which are poorly studied. In fact much of the data about small carnivores comes as by-products of research done on cats and other large carnivores. This so called “bycatch” data is often disparate, and we seek to bring resources to the species that are most in need of conservation and research – and within this IUCN specialist group and Malabar civet is the most imperilled.

Find out more about the SCSG’s conservation work

Discover more civet, genet and binturong species on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

 

  • Christa Wilcke (February 1st, 2016 at 1:44 pm):

    Why do you love it? Typically small carnivores do not get the media attention of their larger relatives (lions and tigers and bears…uh-hum). The IUCN Small Carnivore Specialist Group (SCSG) feels that the Malabar Civet has great potential for stardom – it is furry and has spots and whiskers, but is almost extinct with fewer than 250 estimated in the wild. This is one of many in the “last chance to see” category….

    What are the threats to the Malabar civet? Habitat loss and degradation. There is a lack of any recent records and native habitat is almost entirely gone already. It does not occur in any protected areas and thus has no safe guard – and will surely face extinction in the near future if trends are not corrected.

    What are you doing to save it? The IUCN SCSG attempts to bring awareness to plight of many small carnivore species, many of which are poorly studied. In fact much of the data about small carnivores comes as by-products of research done on cats and other large carnivores. This so called “bycatch” data is often disparate, and we seek to bring resources to the species that are most in need of conservation and research – and within this IUCN specialist group and Malabar civet is the most imperilled.

    This said it and then some.

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