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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Oct 31

Happy Halloween! Here at Arkive, we’re definitely fans of the creepier species that put us in the mood for a spooky Halloween like the vampire bat or the brain coral. But this year, we decided to share our favorite “mask-wearing” animals. These are animals that, with a little help from nature, look like they are wearing a mask all year round. Who knows, maybe some of these animals will inspire your get-up for Halloween tonight!

Bulwer’s pheasant

Bulwer's pheasant photo

One look at the Bulwer’s pheasant and we bet you’d be hard-pressed to find a stranger mask-wearing species on Arkive!

Spectacled bear

Spectacled bear photo

Don’t let this calm face fool you. This bear is ready to scare up the crowd for some midnight Halloween snacks!

Horned grebe

Horned grebe photo

Who’s ready for the masquerade ball? The horned grebe appears ready any day of the year!

Emperor moth

Emperor moth photo

While not a mask in the traditional sense, the “eyes” have it when it comes to the Emperor moth!

Andean cock-of-the-rock

Andean cock-of-the-rock photo

Some may consider the Andean cock-of-the-rock’s head piece a little … outlandish but we think it fits right in on Halloween and every other day of the year!

And finally, because even Halloween can be a time for cuteness as well as spookiness, we present arguably one of the cutest mask-wearers in the wild world …

Giant panda

Giant panda photo

Just one look at that face and we’re ready to hand over our entire bag of Halloween goodies!

Find yourself inspired to wear an animal mask for Halloween tonight after seeing all these incredible “mask-wearers” in nature? We’ve got 8 different animal art masks ready and waiting to be printed and colored by little goblins or ghouls – or big goblins or ghouls, too, for that matter!

No matter how you choose to celebrate, the Arkive team wishes everyone a fun, festive and safe Halloween!

Ari Pineda, Program Coordinator, Wildscreen USA

Sep 22

At Arkive, we are ever grateful for the support we receive from individuals whether they be photographers and filmmakers who donate their work to make Arkive possible, conservationists & researchers who passionately pursue the science and stories behind the world’s most threatened species, or teachers who bring the WILD into their classroom everyday with Arkive.

But there may be a special group that we cherish support from the most … children! Or, who we like to think of as the “conservationists of tomorrow”. Each time the Arkive team has the chance to connect with children, whether in the classroom, at an event, or on the web through our games and mobile apps, we feel renewed and inspired in our mission to share the wonders of the natural world through the most powerful and compelling images and films that exist.

But sometimes, just when you think you have reached the point of complete inspiration from those youngest members of our society, they completely blow your socks off.

The Afternoon Explorers!

The preschoolers (students age 3-5) of Akiba-Schechter Jewish Day School of Chicago, IL, USA, did just that when they decided to dedicate their annual school fundraiser proceeds to Arkive this year and raised

 $317.69

That’s right. Approximately sixteen students, 5 years old and younger. raised over $300 for Arkive in support of our mission and to help keep Arkive a free and growing resource for all. The only thing better than raising this enormously generous sum for Arkive is the way they did it.

Akiba Schechter is full to the brim with students who are eager to dive into the natural world, learning about both species that live in their community and across the globe. Through a program called the Afternoon Explorers, the students decide which species and habitats they want to digitally explore and spend weeks diving into the photos, films, stories, and scientific information learning everything they can.

Then, at the end of the school year, students channel all the knowledge they have gained through their worldly explorations and interpret it through artwork which they sell at their year-end culminating event called the Afternoon Explorers Boutique. The Boutique is a chance for the students to share their wild journeys with family, friends and the local community and to sell their artwork with proceeds benefiting the students’ charity of choice. Lucky for us, Arkive was their chosen charity for 2014.

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Why was Arkive chosen this year? According to one of the teachers leading the Afternoon Explorers, Emily Bradley Schoenberg,

“Arkive has given the children an amazing window to the world around them and has inspired them to think about the Earth and all of its creatures and how some are endangered. It gives them a sense of responsibility to care for those animals and the environment to make sure they are safe.”

Here’s a taste of some of the incredible items made by the explorers for the Boutique.

Picture1

Afternoon Explorer Boutique items – all hand made by the Explorers themselves

And even better, every single item was sold! The team here at Arkive cannot thank the Afternoon Explorers enough for using Arkive as their window to the natural world and for so generously naming Arkive as the recipient of this year’s Afternoon Explorer’s Boutique.  Keep on exploring!

Liana Vitali, Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

Sep 15

Wildscreen Photography Festival is THE must-attend event in the wildlife photography calendar.

This annual gathering of the world’s very best wildlife and environmental photographers gives you the chance to immerse yourself in the sheer wonder of the natural world. You can discover the stories behind some of the most iconic wildlife images of recent times as well get practical advice and guidance direct from industry experts.

We are incredibly fortunate in that many Wildscreen Photography Festival speakers also kindly contribute their images to Arkive and this year is no exception. From keynote speaker Tim Laman , to award-wining conservationist Robin Moore and to Britain’s best-known underwater photographer Alex Mustard, there is a whole plethora of talented and generous Arkive media donors taking to the podium to share their amazing stories.

Below is our pick of some of our favourite images on Arkive from this year’s speakers.

Tickets are on sale now!

Tim Laman

Red bird-of-paradise  - Tim Laman

Red bird-of-paradise – Tim Laman

Robin Moore

Macaya breast-spot frog - Robin Moore

Macaya breast-spot frog – Robin Moore

Alex Mustard

Basking shark feeding at waters surface - Alex Mustard

Basking shark feeding at waters surface – Alex Mustard

Bruno D’Amicis

Meadow viper in habitat - Bruno D'Amicis

Meadow viper in habitat – Bruno D’Amicis

Fiona Rogers

Mandrill - Fiona Rogers

Mandrill – Fiona Rogers

Sven Zacek

Eurasian beaver - Sven Zacek

Eurasian beaver – Sven Zacek

Chris Packham

Merlin - Chris Packham

Merlin – Chris Packham

Mark Carwardine

Boto - Mark Carwardine

Boto – Mark Carwardine

Nick Upton

Harlequin ladybird - Nick Upton

Harlequin ladybird – Nick Upton

 

Sep 3

This October, Bristol will be hosting a comedy night with a difference! If you’re in the UK, join us for a night of laughter and hilarity at Colston Hall, hosted by Simon Watt (Inside Nature’s Giants, the Infinite Monkey Cage) as we seek to delve deep into some of the weirdest creatures on this earth. Move away from the Panda, Tiger and Penguin and think ugly. No animal is too ugly to enter these doors – the floodgates have opened to a new era where ugliness rules! Tickets on sale now at the bargain price of £10.75 - don’t miss out!

Stand Up for Ugly Animals Banner

Featuring:

Simon Watt
Simon Watt is a biologist, writer, science communicator, comedian and TV presenter. He runs Ready Steady Science, a science communication company committed to making information interesting and takes science based performances into schools, museums, theatres and festivals.  Simon also runs the Ugly Animal Preservation Society which is a comedy night with a conservation twist.

Sara Pascoe
English writer, comedienne and actress Sara Pascoe has appeared on Never Mind the Buzzcocks, Stand Up for the Week and QI. Sara started stand-up in late 2007 and the following year was a runner-up in the Funny Women competition and placed third in the So You Think You’re Funny? new act competition.

Bec Hill
Aussie comic Bec Hill hails from Adelaide and started comedy in 2006 at the tender age of 19, when she made the national finals of the Raw new act competition. Two years later made her solo debut at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival with her show If You Can Read This My Cape Fell Off. The show won her a Critic’s Choice Award and a plethora of positive reviews, and, buoyed by success, she voyaged to the UK to take part in the Edinburgh Fringe.
Having received glorious reviews for her Edinburgh shows from the likes of Chortle and The Scotsman, Hill is now firmly based in the UK. She continues to impress on the live circuit and has set up a bi-monthly pun-based comedy night called Pun-Run, which has become a hit with seasoned comics and punters alike.

Helen Arney
Thinking that she’d left her geek past behind after graduating in Physics from Imperial College, Helen Arney proved herself wrong when she turned to writing original and funny songs inspired by science. Since touring the UK in Uncaged Monkeys with Robin Ince and Brian Cox, she’s popped up on Channel 4, BBC 2, BBC Radio 3, Radio 4, 5 Live and 6 Music, and at the Edinburgh Fringe with her award-winning solo show ‘Voice of an Angle’.
Helen also presents science on Discovery Channel in ‘You Have Been Warned’ and has filled several notebooks with rhymes for Uranus.

Dan Schreiber
Dan Schreiber is co-producer/ creator of BBC’s The Museum of Curiosity and a stand-up comedian. He also co-hosts the podcast ‘No Such Thing as a Fish’ and is one of the notorious ‘Elves’ – more commonly known as researchers – on BBC 2′s QI.

Sarah Bennetto
Sarah Bennetto is a stand-up comic from Melbourne, Australia, now living and performing in the UK. She has appeared on stage, radio and television as a stand-up comic and presenter, and is responsible for experimental comedy collective Storytellers’ Club.
Since living in London, Sarah regularly pops up on the radio, and hosts a radio show for WorthyFM, live from the Glastonbury Music Festival. Sarah has hosted Storytellers’ Club and performed stand-up comedy at festivals around the country. On television, she has appeared on ITV’s Take The Mic and Dara O’Briain’s School of Hard Sums.

Elf Lyons
Elf Lyons is a stand-up comedian, writer, director and actress. She is a founder member and compere of “The Secret Comedians”, a small comedy collective which she started when studying at Bristol University, and has since transferred to East London. She is also a co-director of OddFlock, a London based theatre company made up of a group of Drama graduates from the University of Bristol. She was Funny Women Finalist & Runner Up in 2013.

Stand up for Ugly Animals is in association with ‘The Ugly Animal Preservation Society’, Wildscreen Festivals & the global conservation organisation WWF.

Sep 2

What is SINNG?

The Student Invasive Non-Native Group or SINNG is a Local Action Group based at Cornwall College, Newquay. Launched in 2010, our goal is to increase awareness and reduce the impacts caused by Invasive Non-Native Species (INNS) on native wildlife. We do this through practical fieldwork such as pond clearings, Himalayan Balsam removal and much more. We also continue to research the effects, spread and impact of INNS on native species.

Students clearing a pond of Parrot's feather

Students clearing a pond of Parrot’s feather

SINNG is mostly comprised of student volunteers from all seven Cornwall College campuses. We also have an international link with SINNG Helicon in The Netherlands.

My experiences at SINNG

I originally started helping out with SINNG to gain experience of working with children, as I want to become a primary school teacher. Therefore most of my work has involved the educational side of SINNG,  including volunteering at the ‘Saplings’ after school club, helping run workshops in schools throughout Cornwall and creating education materials.

At the ‘Saplings’ after school club we try to incorporate a broad range of INNS ideas. This has included looking at the effect pets can have on native wildlife if they escape or are released into the wild and become invasive. These after school clubs have also provided good opportunities to test out new materials we have made, including our Alien Invaders game and a game I created called ‘Guess Who’s Invasive’, which went down really well with the children, especially if they had played ‘Guess Who’ before.

During the school workshops that I have helped run, a wide variety of games and activities have been used to engage the children. Using microscopes and ID guides to identify invasive pond plants and native invertebrate always goes down well.

Local children enjoying activities at SINNG STEM club

Local children enjoying activities at SINNG STEM club

With the school workshops, the session is adjusted to fit what the children have been learning. For example, in a workshop at St Columb Minor, Newquay, they had already been learning about food webs, so we talked about the effect INNS can have on food webs and ecosystems as a whole. Using the invasive Australian Flatworm as an example, we showed how they eat native earthworms and the knock on effects that can follow. One important aspect of a workshop is showing pupils what to do if they find an INNS. On our website we have a ‘Submit a Sighting’ page which allows the public to record any INNS in their area.

How did it all go?

One of the great things about SINNG, is that I feel at the end of a session the children have leant something they didn’t know before. I think this is because the sessions are run in a fun and interactive way. Plus at the end of most sessions the children are tested, using our interactive activities, on what they have learnt.

SINNG pairs game

SINNG pairs game

Activities which require participation from the children, such as the bicarb and vinegar experiment, always go down well.

The most important part about the educational side of SINNG is that children can enjoy themselves whilst learning about important environmental issues.

Liam Burton

Find out more about SINNG by visiting their website or Facebook page.

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