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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Giri Putri cave crab

Nominated by: Fauna and Flora International

Conservation status: Critically Endangered – its known range is about 0.003 square kilometres, only one locality is known, and the habitat is imminently threatened by uncontrolled and increasing tourism/religious practices.

Why do you love it? Partly because no one else does, partly because we believe that it has as much right to attention as our other flagship species such as tigers and elephants, and partly because we have good partners and believe that together we can bring it back from the brink.

What are the threats to the Giri Putri cave crab? The primary threat to this crab is the increasing use of the cave by pilgrims and worshippers at the main cave of Giri Putri. In 1994 when the crab was discovered the infrastructure was minimal, but now there are walkways and seating across part of the cave floor, and electric lights. Six visits since the original discovery have noted a decline in the abundance of the crab, although some of that may have been caused by visits being undertaken in relatively dry periods when free water on the floor of the cave was less available. It is possible that the crabs benefit from food offerings left and spilled on the ground but this is not yet confirmed.

What are you doing to save it? We are very pleased that the Save Our Species Rapid Action Programme has recently given us a small grant to increase local attention to the crab’s plight and changed behaviour from the pilgrims who visit the cave.  As part of that and beyond we shall be instituting a programme of monitoring by a local student and the local NGO Friends of National Park Foundation.

Find out more about Fauna and Flora International

Discover more crustacean species on Arkive

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

 

Species: Giraffe

Nominated by: Tusk Task Force

Conservation status: There are nine subspecies of giraffes and most are threatened. Some subspecies are classified Vulnerable (Nubian, 250 left in the wild in E/S Sudan, SW Ethiopia) and Endangered such as the Rothschild’s (Baringo/Uganda, fewer than 700 in Kenya, South Sudan, and Uganda) and West African (Niger/Nigerian, with less than 220 remaining in Cameroon, SW Niger). There are only 38 Congolese giraffes left in the wild.

Giraffes are now extinct in Angola, Eritrea, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Nigeria, and Senegal but reintroduced in Rwanda and the Swaziland.

Why do you love it? Due to the “silent extinction” that the species is now facing. Tusk Task Force is the only USA-based NGO focusing on giraffes (along with the elephant and the rhino) as part of its wildlife conservation mission.

What are the threats to the giraffe? Pervasive poaching of giraffe has been reported in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, and Tanzania with heads and bones believed to be sold for $140 USD each. Bush meat also provides a substantial source of income for impoverished rural communities in rural Africa.

Giraffes are poached for their brains and bone marrow, sold as fake cure for HIV, AIDS and cancer in China and Vietnam by smugglers. Giraffe tails are poached to make bracelets, necklaces, and other jewellery. In Tanzania and the Congo, giraffes are killed by wildlife terrorists for food while they poach for elephants and rhinos, making poaching a triple-threat to three species at the same time. Giraffes are also suffering as a result of indiscriminate killing for ivory. The “silent extinction” of giraffes is exacerbated by habitat destruction due to deforestation, development, and farming.

What are you doing to save it? Our vision and mission to save the species are three-fold: Advocacy, Protection, and Research. Along with the UK-based Giraffe Conservation Foundation (GCF) and the Giraffe Conservation Alliance (GCA), we aim to improve the giraffe’s population outcomes that is free from harm, due to human conflict and human violence.

Advocacy:

  • Build public awareness through consulting, education, public relations, and research
  • Influence public policy channels by supporting legislation supporting giraffe conservation on the international, national, state, and local levels
  • Ally and consult with other advocates and NGOs on their targeted giraffe conservation campaigns
  • Deliver public policy advocacy resources and to advocates and/or individuals at the grassroots level through our Tusk Ambassadors™ program
  • Support global advocates on all levels, aligned with our mission, promoting giraffe conservation

Protection:

  • Allocate tactical and operational resources to wildlife park rangers protecting giraffes
  • Execute direct and in-direct force protection programs through our Tusk Defenders™ program
  • Partner with other NGOs to help with their anti-poaching and giraffe conservation efforts
  • Ally with technology firms to enhance innovative tools to combat poaching of giraffes
  • Collaborate with other NGOs to support a vibrant wildlife economy instead of a violent extinction economy that includes humanitarian aid to communities affected by poaching

Research:

  • Provide a comprehensive repository of intelligence on the subject including the DoW or DATA on Wildlife™ (Database of All Terrorist Activities on Wildlife) with regards to giraffe population
  • Compile, analyse, provide, and share intelligence of giraffe casualties to all advocates and NGOs
  • Promote data-driven and knowledge-based approach to help us address solutions to alleviate giraffe mortality rates
  • Authenticate with intelligence sources to confirm information regarding general and specific wildlife terrorism events on giraffes
  • Corroborate each source of intelligence we acquire using “triangulation” or “five points” methodology to make sure that the source is as accurate as possible.

Find out more about the work of Tusk Task Force

Did you know the okapi is the giraffe’s closest relative? Find out more about the okapi on Arkive

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

 

Species: Bear cuscus

Nominated by: Rainforest Alliance

Conservation status: Vulnerable

Why do you love it? This arboreal species has a special connection to cocoa, something near and dear to our hearts! Also, while they may look and sound like they’re a cute and cuddly little bear, this is actually one of the few marsupial species found outside of Australia and New Zealand. As the Sulawesi bear cuscus only lives in one part of the world, they are very rare and not well-known.

What are the threats to the bear cuscus? This species of cuscus can only be found in Indonesia, and while technically protected by law, deforestation and hunting are driving them into rapid decline.

What are you doing to save it? Rainforest Alliance Certified farms must adhere to strong protections for biodiversity and wildlife, which Indonesia has in rich abundance. In Bantaeng, Sumatra, there was pervasive misconception amongst farmers that cuscus were consuming cocoa pods, when it was actually rats eating all of the cocoa.  Before achieving Rainforest Alliance certification, many of these farmers had been trapping and hunting the cuscus, but our teams worked with them to implement safe and responsible methods of protecting their cocoa from the rats.  Furthermore, the farmers and workers have learned to take better care of the natural environment and to protect local species.

To further enforce the standards protecting biodiversity and wildlife, the Rainforest Alliance’s team, along with local cocoa farmers, posted ‘No Hunting’ signs among local cocoa farms and in the community forests. Bantaeng’s cuscuses can now roam freely and as a result of the protective measures, the number of Sulawesi bear cuscus found on Rainforest Alliance Certified farms has increased. Some are even choosing to live on the farmers’ roofs! By working with locals rather than against them, and promoting responsible agricultural standards, trainings, and practices, our work is leading to both sustainable livelihoods and strong protections for wildlife and ecosystems.

Find out more about the Rainforest Alliance’s work with the bear cuscus

Discover more marsupial species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Mangrove finch

Nominated by: Charles Darwin Foundation

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? The mangrove finch (Camarynchus heliobates) is one of 14 species of Darwin’s finches that only live in the Galapagos Islands. It is the rarest bird in the archipelago with an estimated population of 80 individuals, inhabiting just 30 hectards at two sites on Isabela Island.

What are the threats to the mangrove finch: The main known threats to this species are the introduced parasitic fly, Philornis downsi and the introduced black rat (Rattus rattus).

What are you doing to save it? The Mangrove Finch Project is a bi-institutional project carried out by the Charles Darwin Foundation and Galapagos National Park Directorate in collaboration with San Diego Zoo Global and Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust. The project is supported by Galapagos Conservation Trust, The Leona M and Harry B Helmsley Charitable Trust, and The British Embassy in Ecuador.

Find out more about the work of the Charles Darwin Foundation

Discover more of Darwin’s finches on Arkive

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Mountain chicken

Nominated by: Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? Beauty may be in the eye of the beholder, but we believe the mountain chicken is a beautiful frog! It’s the largest frog in the Americas and top native terrestrial predator on Montserrat and Dominica and culturally important to the islanders. It has a unique breeding system, with a high degree of parental care making it more like a bird than a frog and living up to its common English moniker. Once abundant across the islands its population has been decimated and its once familiar deep call has disappeared from the night-time.

What are the threats to the mountain chicken? Primary threat is the amphibian fungal disease chytridiomycosis.

What are you doing to save it? The Mountain Chicken Recovery Programme is a partnership between Durrell, ZSL, Chester Zoo, Norden’s Ark and the Governments of Montserrat and Dominica.

One key activity this year is that we want to unite the last two known wild mountain chickens on Montserrat – one male and one female – in the hope that they will breed, and with everyone’s support provide a happy Valentine’s ending for all.

Find out more about Durrell’s work with the mountain chicken

Find out more about the collaborative effort to save the mountain chicken from extinction

Discover more frog and toad species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Smalltooth sawfish

Nominated by: Sharks4Kids

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? The smalltooth sawfish is a perfect ambassador for the diverse, weird and wonderful world of elasmobranchs. The sawfish is a remarkable creature and we’ve been fortunate enough to see a couple in the wild. Most students know about tiger sharks and great whites, but we want their knowledge, curiosity and compassion to spread beyond the celebrity sharks.

What are the threats to the smalltooth sawfish? Their range and population has been drastically reduced over the last century due to fishing. Once a targeted species, they are now mostly caught as bycatch. Because of the teeth on their rostrum, they are easily caught in nets, including gill nets and trawling equipment. Habitat loss has also had an impact, with development removing critical mangrove and estuary areas.

What are you doing to save it? Our main focus is to teach students all around the world about elasmobranchs, the threats they face and how people can help. We do a lot of work with students in Florida and The Bahamas, so the smalltooth sawfish is a very relevant species to discuss. We have created posters and information sheets for kids and teachers to have in the classroom, as well as collaborating with other organisations like Shark Advocates International to promote better global protection of the 5 species of sawfish, all listed as Critically Endangered. We have also done blog interviews with researchers studying these animals, as a way of sharing even more information about these incredible creatures.

Find out more about Sharks4Kids and their conservation work

Discover more ray and skate species on Arkive

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Grey-headed flying fox

Nominated by: Wildlife Land Trust

Conservation status: Vulnerable

Why do you love it? Grey-headed flying-foxes are Australia’s only endemic flying-fox and one of the largest bats in the world.  They are able to travel large distances for food making them vital for pollination and thus the reproduction, regeneration and evolution of a range of forest ecosystems.  They are also critical to the survival of a number of coastal vegetation species that are only receptive to pollination at night.  Grey-headed flying-foxes are also highly social and intelligent animals, and the often vitriolic and unwarranted treatment they receive makes it all the more important to stand up for them!

What are the threats to the grey-headed flying fox? Threats to the grey-headed flying-fox are numerous, and include habitat loss and fragmentation (particularly in urban areas), climate change (grey-headed flying-foxes are unable to tolerate very high temperatures, making them susceptible to heat stress deaths during hot periods) and shooting by orchardists for crop protection.  This latter threat is particularly disturbing due to the nature of injuries suffered, with documented instances of pregnant flying-foxes or mothers with reliant young stranded on the ground dying of starvation due to punctured wings.  Not even the dwindling remnants of flying-fox habitat are safe, with urban colonies often being subject to forced dispersals due to people not liking living next door to them – these are often conducted through methods with severe implications on animal welfare.

What are you doing to save it? The Wildlife Land Trust has been long involved with grey-headed flying fox conservation, from our nomination that led to the species being listed as nationally threatened (under the Federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999) in 2001, to our ongoing involvement in the New South Wales Flying-fox Consultative Committee.

We were also instrumental in the establishment of a wildlife-friendly orchard netting subsidy in New South Wales which has halted licenced shooting for crop protection in the state, and continue to lobby authorities on the importance of maintaining existing camps and protecting habitat suitable for grey-headed flying-foxes at a local, state and federal level.  Our ongoing efforts are focusing on improving legal protection and management policies throughout the various jurisdictions grey-headed flying-foxes call home.

Find out more about the Wildlife Land Trust and their work

Discover more bat species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

 

Species: Javan langur

Nominated by: Aspinall Foundation

Conservation status: Vulnerable

Why do you love it? Langurs are very family-orientated and groups stay together most of their natural lives, with little ones being looked after by the whole group.

We have looked after Javan langurs at both Howletts Wild Animal Park and Port Lympne Reserve, since 1988 and have enjoyed great breeding success with these primates.  We now return langurs (along with Javan gibbons and grizzled leaf monkeys) from the Kent parks to our Javan Primate Project in Indonesia.

At our project, they are looked after by our dedicated team, adjusted to the climate and their new surroundings, before being introduced to langurs or gibbons rescued from the illegal pet trade in Indonesia and eventually released into protected forests in order to boost the dwindling wild population.

Howletts and Port Lympne have bred langurs for the past 20 years and we have one of the largest collections of Javan langurs in the world.

What are the threats to the Javan langur? Habitat loss, the illegal pet trade and hunting are all threats to the Javan langur.

What are you doing to save it? The Aspinall Foundation’s Javan Primate Conservation Project was set up in 2009 and aims to achieve the following:

– The reduction of the illegal trade and possession of Indonesian primates by repression (facilitating confiscation of illegally held primates) and by prevention (information, awareness, education

– The rehabilitation of confiscated primates, for the conservation and individual welfare of these ‘ambassadors’ of their species

– The reintroduction of endangered primate species to sites from where they have been extirpated

– The management of these sites for the restoration and the protection of their natural resources

– The promotion of local, national and international awareness of the threats facing the primates of Java

In addition to boosting indigenous populations with captive-bred primates and those rescued and rehabilitated in the charity’s centres in West and East Java, the Aspinall Foundation along with the Indonesian government is committed to a programme of reducing the illegal hunting and trade of the species through information, education and awareness.

Find out more about the Aspinall Foundation’s overseas projects

Discover more Old World Monkey species on Arkive

 

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