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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Turtle dove

Nominated by: Sussex Wildlife Trust

Conservation status: Protected in the UK under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, 1981. Classified in the UK as a Red List species under the Birds of Conservation Concern Review and as a Priority Species in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan.

Why do you love it? Turtle doves are the ancient symbol of love and fidelity, with pairs remaining faithful from one year to the next. They are exquisite little doves, with beautifully delicate chestnut plumage. Turtle doves are the sound of springtime at our Woods Mill Nature Reserve; listen out for their graceful purring call floating over the blackthorn, crooning for all to hear, clearly visible at the top of a tall tree.

And where would we be on the second day of Christmas without two turtle doves?

What are the threats to the turtle dove? Turtle dove numbers have drastically declined in Sussex and the rest of the UK in the last 50 years, due to changing agricultural practices and habitat loss. Recent studies estimate there has been a 90 percent reduction in breeding birds since the 1960s and their breeding range in Sussex has halved in just 20 years. Unfortunately this is a pattern which is being echoed across Europe and the turtle dove is now considered to be the second most likely bird to become extinct in England by 2020.

What are you doing to save it? The Sussex Wildlife Trust is now working with Operation Turtle Dove which aims to identify the primary cause of decline and develop urgent practical solutions. We are lucky to still have a small number of breeding pairs in Sussex each summer. In particular the Adur Valley, including our nature reserve at Woods Mill.

There are two things that turtle doves need to successfully breed:

– Both adults and chicks require a continuous supply of suitable seeds throughout the summer from late April until the end of August. They feed on the ground in weedy areas where vegetation is short and sparse and especially depend on fumitory, knotgrass, chickweed, oilseed rape and cereal grains.

– Most turtle doves nest in hedgerows or scrub over 4m tall, so they need tall, mature hedgerows, areas of scrub or woodland edges with a thick shrub layer. Nests are also often associated with climbers including clematis, honeysuckle and bramble.

Find out more about the work of the Sussex Wildlife Trust

Discover more pigeon and dove species on Arkive

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Field cow-wheat

Nominated by: Species Recovery Trust

Conservation status: Listed under Schedule 8 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act, making it an offence to pick, uproot or destroy it

Why do you love it? It’s a spectacular looking thing, with a truly bizarre inflorescence of mixed purple and yellow flowers. It also has an unusual lifecycle, producing half of its food by the normal method of photosynthesis, but getting the other half by parasitising the roots of other plants.

What are the threats to the field cow-wheat? Because it’s so rare (it only grows in four sites in the UK) it is under extremely high risk of localised extinctions – one of the sites is a nature reserve but at the others it receives little protection. Because it favours edge habitats it is also constantly at risk from scrub encroachment and losing the open areas it needs to thrive in. It has a complex germination strategy involving forming an association with the roots of other plants, and we don’t know how this might be affected by climate change and shifting weather patterns.

What are you doing to save it? We have set up a monitoring programme across all of its sites, and last year collected seed from half the sites to put in then Millenium Seed Bank at Kew Gardens. We have carried out habitat management at two sites and are working closely with the owners of the other sites to ensure their work does all it can to enhance the species.

Find out more about the Species Recovery Trust and the different plants and animals that they work with

Discover more dicot species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Mountain tapir

Nominated by: WWF Peru

Conservation status: Endangered

Why do you love it? The mountain tapir is characterised by its dense black fur and white lips. When it is at a young age, the mountain tapir has some particular white lines on its body, giving them a cheerful appearance. However, these lines disappear when adult. It is a species that requires our entire attention, considering that there are less than 2,500 adult individuals. It is estimated thar the mountain tapir population will decline by over 50 percent in the next 3 generations (33 years).  It lives in the Andean region of Colombia, Ecuador and northern Peru, and is locally extinct in much of its original range of distribution. This species lives in the chaparral, the Andean forest, the paramo and the river grasslands and at elevations above 1,400 meters.

What are the threats to the mountain tapir? Years ago, the hunting pressure was the main threat for the mountain tapir and now it’s slow rate of reproduction and its solitary nature makes it vulnerable to habitat destruction. On the other hand, the mountain tapir has to deal with the conversion of forests and moorlands into agricultural and grazing lands.

What are you doing to save it? At WWF Peru, we work to support the National Service of Protected Areas by the State – SERNANP, and particularly, the Headquarters of the Tabaconas Namballe National Sanctuary, in order to generate further information for the conservation of endangered species, such as the mountain tapir (purpose of creating this Sanctuary), the spectacled bear, the dwarf deer and the Andean coati.

Based on the information obtained, we will know more about the habitat preferences of these species and can also identify the conservation actions that are required in the Sanctuary, such as monitoring, finding areas with large populations, amongst other actions with aims to protect them in the long-term. We must always remember that these species habitats are greatly impacted by climate change.

Find out more about WWF Peru’s conservation projects

Explore the profiles of other tapir species on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

 

Species: Ocean quahog

Nominated by: Northern Ireland Marine Taskforce

Conservation status: Nationally Important Marine Feature (NIMF); OSPAR List of Threatened and Declining Species (only in Region II – Greater North Sea)

Why do you love it? The ocean quahog is one of our most incredible marine animals. This large clam lives buried in the sediment and can live for over 500 years! An ancient population in Belfast Lough is around 220 years old, surviving both World Wars and witnessing the launch of the RMS Titanic.

What are the threats to the ocean quahog? Activities that damage the seafloor (dredging and bottom trawling, large anchors) and pollution. As the ocean quahog is very slow-growing and long-lived it takes a long time for damaged populations to recover.

What are you doing to save it? All members of the Northern Ireland Marine Task Force are campaigning to support the designation of a Marine Conservation Zone in Outer Belfast Lough to protect the ocean quahog.

Find out how you can help by visiting the Northern Ireland Marine Task Force website

Discover other clam species on Arkive

VOTE NOW!

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: White-bellied heron

Nominated by: International Rivers

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? This is a beautiful, solitary, and very tall bird who’s been described as “extremely shy.” It’s the second-tallest heron in the world, and adults can reach one metre tall. It feeds on fish in clear, fast-flowing rivers. The sighting of this heron is an indicator of the health and well-being of a mountainscape, a river, and a region’s biodiversity.

What are the threats to the white-bellied heron? Many of the few remaining white-bellied herons live in Bhutan, but decades of hydropower development have disturbed Bhutan’s rivers and fish populations. Power lines are also a danger to this species when it is in flight.

What are you doing to save it? We are working in Bhutan to raise awareness about the white-bellied heron as an indicator of the state of Bhutan’s rivers, and promoting alternatives to hydropower that would allow Bhutan to save its free-flowing rivers (and all the wildlife that depends on them) while generating the power it needs.

Find out more about the work of International Rivers

Discover more heron and bittern species on Arkive

 

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