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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Name of species: Lobophyllia serratus

Nominated by: Reef World Foundation

Conservation status: Lobophyllia serratus’s population has decreased by 66% over 30 years, which meets the threshold for “Endangered” under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Why the Reef-World Foundation love Lobophyllia serratus: Coral reefs are known as the building blocks of marine life; everything from the orang-utan crabs to the great white shark and everything in between depends on them. They are formed by thousands of individual corals of varying shapes and sizes, each one playing a very important role within the ecosystem. ‘Lobo coral’ is the lobed brain of the reef. It is restricted to the South-East Asian region, where The Reef-World Foundation’s efforts are concentrated; and it is an extremely rare find.

Coral reefs are living animals; they eat, sleep and reproduce, albeit slightly differently to you and me! They can be resilient to isolated stress events (like warming oceans!) but become extremely vulnerable when multiple threats and human activities add further pressure. In order to increase coral resilience we aim to build a closer relationship between humans and corals through education and empowerment.

Threats to the Lobophyllia serratus’s survival: ‘Lobo coral’ is usually found on reef slopes, between 4 and 15 metres, making it highly vulnerable to all human influences.

It faces a wide variety of threats, from those at the local scale such as tourism, diving and snorkelling and destructive fishing practices, to those at the global scale such as climate change, ocean acidification and marine pollution. A combination of any of these threats may lead to decreased resilience and an increased susceptibility to disease. Just like with any animal, diseases are considered one of the major threats to coral reefs worldwide; as the frequency and distribution of diseases grow, the bigger the threat becomes.

Information on the Reef-World Foundation’s work with Lobophyllia serratus: The Reef-World Foundation is a UK charity that has been working to inspire and empower people to conserve and sustainably develop coastal resources, specifically coral reefs, in South-East Asia and the Indian Ocean for over ten years. As the principle technical partner for the UNEP initiative, Green Fins, Reef-World has worked with national governments, the private sector and local communities to expand the initiative to protect coral reefs across six countries, driving marine conservation efforts through education and consultation.

Find out more about the Reef-World Foundation

Discover more marine invertebrate species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Pearl-bordered fritillary

Nominated by: Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust Conservation status:

– Section 41 species of principal importance under the NERC Act in England

– Section 42 species of principal importance under the NERC Act in Wale

– Scottish Biodiversity List

– UK BAP: Priority Species

– Butterfly Conservation priority: High

– European status: Not threatened

– Protected under Schedule 5 of the 1981 Wildlife and Countryside Act (for sale only)

Why do you love it? The pearl-bordered fritillary (or PBF as we lovingly refer to it) is a little orange butterfly, easily overlooked, but rewarding the careful observer with surprisingly confiding views of their subtle markings. Get yourself in the right place at the right time and you may be lucky enough to be surrounded by these flitting beauties – a very rare treat. Once bitten by the PBF bug it is hard not to want to do all you can to save this delicate little butterfly!

What are the threats to the pearl-bordered fritillary? Changes in land management leading to habitat loss and fragmentation has turned this once common butterfly into one of our most rapidly declining species.

Three main habitats are used by the species: woodland clearings, usually in recently coppiced or clear-felled woodland; well-drained habitats with mosaics of grass, dense bracken and light scrub and open deciduous wood pasture in Scotland. In all habitats it requires abundant foodplants (violets) growing in short, sparse vegetation, where there is abundant leaf litter. Overgrazing by sheep or the abandonment of grazing can cause the loss of suitable habitat. In woodlands, lack of woodland management, particularly coppicing is the main cause.

What are you doing to save it? From approximately 100 sites where it had been recorded post 1980 the pearl-bordered fritillary is now restricted to just 12 sites in Wales. The last remaining stronghold in Wales is Montgomeryshire where populations are thought to occur on nine sites. In this part of the world, the species seems to prefer south-facing, scrubby slopes with bracken – a habitat known as ‘ffridd’.

For nearly 20 years, Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust has been working with local landowners and partners to safeguard this species in the area, through active habitat management work and appropriate grazing. The outcome of this work, which often involves rotational scrub clearance and bracken management, is carefully monitored through annual monitoring of both adult butterflies and their habitat.

Find out more about the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust’s work

Discover more brush-footed butterfly species on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Corn cleavers

Nominated by: Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland (BSBI)

Conservation status: Critically Endangered: GB Red List 2005; England Red List 2014

Why do you love it? This may be corn cleavers’ last chance to find love. Unlike coffee and gardenia (in the same family) nobody longs for corn cleavers in the morning or swoons at his scent. Formerly a widespread “weed” among cereal crops but – unlike cornflower and corncockle – nobody wants the unshowy flowers of corn cleavers in their 21st Century wildflower seed mix. Easily confused with Galium aparine (common cleavers or sticky willie), corn cleavers is much less common and not so clingy.

What are the threats to corn cleavers? Corn cleavers has declined drastically due to increasing agricultural intensification and only one viable population now remains in Britain – it needs the regular cycle of disturbance enjoyed back in those traditionally-managed cornfields. Although it comes up occasionally as a casual, such as in Cambridgeshire in 1996, following disturbance due to road works, and again in Newcastle in 2014, corn cleavers cannot persist in such surroundings.

What are you doing to save it? BSBI’s volunteer members continue to record and map any sightings of corn cleavers across Britain and Ireland and our expert plant referees confirm any identifications. We monitor the one remaining viable population in Hertfordshire and our Head of Science has been working with the Oxfordshire Rare Plants Group to reintroduce it to a site where it once occurred. Seed from Hertfordshire has also been planted in an arable weed reserve in Buckinghamshire and is stored in Kew’s Millenium Seed Bank.

Find out more about how you could get involved with saving corn cleavers from extinction

Find out more about Kew Gardens’ Millennium Seed Bank

Learn more about the work of BSBI

Discover more endangered plant species on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Djibouti francolin

Nominated by: IUCN Galliformes Species Specialist Group

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? It is endemic to threatened juniper and other forest in a minute range (two known sites) on escarpments in Djibouti. The Djibouti francolin the least publicised of our nine CR species and is a good flagship for its threatened woodland habitats.

What are the threats to the Djibouti francolin? Browsing of juniper seedlings by domestic stock is preventing regeneration as old trees die which is reducing the amount of suitable habitat for this species. Firewood collection, hunting and droughts are also implicated in the decline of this species.

What are you doing to save it? There are likely to be less than 500 individuals left in the wild, and there are none in captivity. Experimental exclusion of stock by fencing has demonstrated that the juniper has the capacity to regenerate, but this practice needs to be scaled up and maintained if it is to be beneficial. Effective action for this species requires the cooperation of shepherds and other local users of the forests. Research into its precise ecological requirements is also required. There is a case for establishing a captive population, using capacity outside Djibouti but in the region.

Find out more about Galliformes and their conservation

Discover more grouse, partridge, pheasant, quail and turkey species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and write a profile on why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight. Each nominee has its own profile on the Arkive blog with information on the species, who nominated them and why they are so special – click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite species to help get them into the top ten and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (7:59 GMT).

Name of species: Otter civet

Nominated by: Society for the Preservation of Endangered Carnivores & their International Ecological Study (S.P.E.C.I.E.S.)

Conservation status: Endangered

Why S.P.E.C.I.E.S. love the otter civet: It is a very unique carnivore, and too little is known about its habits other than it is very rare.

Threats to the otter civet’s survival: Unknown. Probably conversion of forest habitat and broader impacts on tropical watersheds from development activities.

Information on S.P.E.C.I.E.S.’s work with the otter civet: We have conducted numerous surveys in Borneo in cooperation with partners over the years and have yet to record this species. We are still looking for the ideal place to focus on them.

Find out more about other civet species on Arkive

 

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