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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Great white shark

Nominated by: Australian Marine Conservation Society

Conservation status: Vulnerable

Why do you love it? Magnificent. Maligned. Misunderstood. The great white shark has traditionally borne the brunt of negative media attention due to its exaggerated threat to human safety. Fished to near extinction around the world, great white numbers have steadily declined throughout the world’s oceans.

Charismatic, elusive and far ranging creatures, great whites are apex predators at the top of the food chain, crucial in maintaining the balance in marine ecosystems. They are intelligent and powerful creatures, but gravely misunderstood.

What are the threats to the great white shark? The great white faces many threats in Australian waters.  Sadly, the main threats are from humans. Great white sharks are long lived, slow growing and have few babies, making them particularly vulnerable to fishing impacts. Great whites are also a target of cruel and unnecessary shark control programs. In some parts of the world, great whites are fished for their jaws, fins and teeth in the gruesome ‘sport’ of trophy hunting.

What are you doing to save it? AMCS was pivotal in getting great white sharks protected in Australia and we continue to promote them as a species in need of protection.

In the 1990’s, AMCS escalated its campaign as part of the global battle to protect these amazing creatures. Rallying huge public support, the great white shark was protected in all Australian waters and is now listed as a vulnerable and migratory species under Australian environment law.

We drove governments to improve Australia’s leading document on shark conservation and management (the National Plan of Action – Sharks) by including actions that governments around the country had to enact to better protect sharks and ensuring conservation organisations have a say in how sharks are managed and protected.

AMCS created Australia’s Sustainable Seafood Guide, for those who love the oceans and their seafood. Now in print for a decade, the guide is available in paperback, as a dedicated consumer website and smartphone app. The guide encourages consumers to avoid fisheries with bycatch of great whites and other species of conservation concern.

AMCS launched a successful community campaign to ban live shark finning at sea. We continue to work towards a ban in the export and import of shark fins in Australia, to stop our involvement in this terrible trade.

When the Western Australian Government announced the introduction of a shark cull, they were unprepared for the public outcry. Working with conservation partners, AMCS ensured those voices were heard in the corridors of power, and the shark cull was shut down. AMCS continues to campaign on stopping shark control programs in other parts of Australia.

Find out more about the Australian Marine Conservation Society

Discover more sharks, skates and rays on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Malabar civet

Nominated by: IUCN Small Carnivore Specialist Group

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? Typically small carnivores do not get the media attention of their larger relatives (lions and tigers and bears…uh-hum). The IUCN Small Carnivore Specialist Group (SCSG) feels that the Malabar Civet has great potential for stardom – it is furry and has spots and whiskers, but is almost extinct with fewer than 250 estimated in the wild. This is one of many in the “last chance to see” category….

What are the threats to the Malabar civet? Habitat loss and degradation. There is a lack of any recent records and native habitat is almost entirely gone already. It does not occur in any protected areas and thus has no safe guard – and will surely face extinction in the near future if trends are not corrected.

What are you doing to save it? The IUCN SCSG attempts to bring awareness to plight of many small carnivore species, many of which are poorly studied. In fact much of the data about small carnivores comes as by-products of research done on cats and other large carnivores. This so called “bycatch” data is often disparate, and we seek to bring resources to the species that are most in need of conservation and research – and within this IUCN specialist group and Malabar civet is the most imperilled.

Find out more about the SCSG’s conservation work

Discover more civet, genet and binturong species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Mountain horned agama

Nominated by: Pro Wildlife e.V.

Conservation status: Endangered

Why do you love it? Pro Wildlife does not only care for “sexy species”, but also for threatened species, which are overseen by the broad public. The bizarre-looking mountain horned agama, a small agamid, is endemic to Sri Lanka and only recently became a target of reptile smugglers. The biological function of the eye-catching horn is still a secret, but it may help males to attract mates.

What are the threats to the mountain horned agama? Deforestation has been the main threat in the past, but in recent times the species – although strictly protected in Sri Lanka – has been intensely plundered for the European pet trade, where individuals are sold for up to 2,200 €/pair.

What are you doing to save it? In 2014, Pro Wildlife noticed the first online advertisements for this rare species in the EU pet market. Being aware of its strict protection status in Sri Lanka, Pro Wildlife started to investigate and document the trade in the mountain horned agama, to identify key traders and to cooperate with field scientists and the Sri Lankan authorities. The mountain horned agama is one of our case studies to illustrate the huge dimension of plundering of rare wildlife for western terrariums. Our goal is to finally strengthen international protection of this threatened species and to stop the trade in wild-caught specimens.

Find out more about Pro Wildlife e.V.

Learn more about agama lizards on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Northern Bahamian rock iguana (subspecies Andros Island iguana)

Nominated by: IUCN Iguana Specialist Group (ISG)

Conservation status: Endangered

Why do you love it? The preferred habitat of this iguana is under the open canopy of the pine barrens of Andros Island in the Bahamas. Here the limestone karst rock provides adequate shelter and active termite mounds provide nest sites, for one of the largest rock iguanas. This is the only rock iguana species that almost exclusively nests in termite mounds! The female will dig upward into the termite mound from its base, then, lay her eggs outside the mound. She uses her snout and front limbs to push the eggs up into the tunnel entrance. When she is done, she seals the opening with dirt and covers it up. The termite mound is a perfect place to incubate the eggs. The female will guard the nest for up to six weeks. The young iguanas will hatch after 72 to 82 days.

What are the threats to the Andros Island iguana? A major threat to the Andros Island iguana is an increase in the population of feral pigs. Particularly in north Andros, feral pigs pose a very real threat to the recruitment of iguanas as they are known to rout out eggs from iguana nests. Feral and domestic dogs are also a threat to both juvenile and adult animals. Many local residents are apparently unaware of the protected status of the Andros iguanas and may occasionally take them for human consumption.

The Andros iguana is threatened as a result of the acceleration of perturbations to iguana populations, such as habitat loss, feral animals and subsistence hunting. Although the island is large and some undisturbed subpopulations exist, it is only a matter of time before humans or feral animals degrade the populations. An obvious north/south trend in population decline is noted and procedures must be implemented to stop further degradation of subpopulations and habitat.

What are you doing to save it? Dr. Charles Knapp, IUCN SSC Iguana Specialist Group Co-Chair, and Head of Conservation and Research at Shedd Aquarium has been studying Andros Island Iguanas for over twenty years. Supported by Shedd, Dr. Knapp’s work has shed light on the nesting habits of the species. Their long-term commitment has resulted in significant advances in the conservation of Bahamian iguanas as well as a better understanding of conservation strategies for Caribbean iguanas throughout the region. They were among the first to investigate the efficacy of translocating rock iguanas, or moving them to islands with fewer threats, to reduce the risk of extinction. Their detailed ecological studies and distribution surveys, along with direct consultation with Bahamian authorities, resulted in the expansion of an existing national park on Andros Island to include critical iguana habitat and important populations.

Find out more about the Iguana Specialist Group

Discover more lizard and snake species on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: European honey bee

Nominated by: BeeBristol

Conservation status: widespread and common species

Why do you love it? The honey bee is one of nature’s hardest workers, it takes around one million trips to make one tea spoon of honey, all the while pollinating each plant they visit. The level of organisation, team work and sacrifice it takes to keep a healthy productive hive against all odds is breath-taking. Honey bees across the world have been telling us, like the canary in the coal mine, that we are not in sync with nature and instead valuing profit over the environment. With increasing numbers of honey bees and all other pollinating insects struggling worldwide we are experiencing a desperate and critical fork in the road which has been mentioned in parliament here in the UK and governments on an international scale over the past ten years.

The honey bee has become is the figure head for all pollinators worldwide, at the forefront of a fight that must maintain momentum. The battle for our environment through the way we manage land, use chemicals, expand our urban areas and overall, interact with nature must be won. It’s imperative we continue to promote and use the image of the honey bee to rally the general public and industry behind its important cause, for the sake of all insects, plants and even the human race. So we love the honey bee not just for its brilliance, beauty and role in pollination; but for the proven influence and power it’s shown in the media to enable positive environmental change at a government level in so many countries across the world.

What are the threats to the European honey bee? Habitat loss, degradation, and fragmentation, non-native species and diseases, pollution, pesticides including neonicotionoids and climate change.

What are you doing to save it? BeeBristol’s main focuses include awareness raising through street art, instillations and engagement events. We focus our conservation work on creating new wildflower meadows, habitat and foraging opportunities for all pollinators including honey bees. With all our work we like to include local people and inspire actions on a personal level to be made at home or in the workplace to benefit pollinators. We also manage a number of beehives, never using chemicals or adopting harsh beekeeping techniques, we always lean to a more holistic natural beekeeping approach. Our work with schools and community groups has a positive impact on our local area and we’ve formed a partnership with River of Flowers to distribute forage on a national and international level.

Find out more about BeeBristol’s work

Discover more bee species on Arkive

 

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