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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Corn cleavers

Nominated by: Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland (BSBI)

Conservation status: Critically Endangered: GB Red List 2005; England Red List 2014

Why do you love it? This may be corn cleavers’ last chance to find love. Unlike coffee and gardenia (in the same family) nobody longs for corn cleavers in the morning or swoons at his scent. Formerly a widespread “weed” among cereal crops but – unlike cornflower and corncockle – nobody wants the unshowy flowers of corn cleavers in their 21st Century wildflower seed mix. Easily confused with Galium aparine (common cleavers or sticky willie), corn cleavers is much less common and not so clingy.

What are the threats to corn cleavers? Corn cleavers has declined drastically due to increasing agricultural intensification and only one viable population now remains in Britain – it needs the regular cycle of disturbance enjoyed back in those traditionally-managed cornfields. Although it comes up occasionally as a casual, such as in Cambridgeshire in 1996, following disturbance due to road works, and again in Newcastle in 2014, corn cleavers cannot persist in such surroundings.

What are you doing to save it? BSBI’s volunteer members continue to record and map any sightings of corn cleavers across Britain and Ireland and our expert plant referees confirm any identifications. We monitor the one remaining viable population in Hertfordshire and our Head of Science has been working with the Oxfordshire Rare Plants Group to reintroduce it to a site where it once occurred. Seed from Hertfordshire has also been planted in an arable weed reserve in Buckinghamshire and is stored in Kew’s Millenium Seed Bank.

Find out more about how you could get involved with saving corn cleavers from extinction

Find out more about Kew Gardens’ Millennium Seed Bank

Learn more about the work of BSBI

Discover more endangered plant species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Djibouti francolin

Nominated by: IUCN Galliformes Species Specialist Group

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? It is endemic to threatened juniper and other forest in a minute range (two known sites) on escarpments in Djibouti. The Djibouti francolin the least publicised of our nine CR species and is a good flagship for its threatened woodland habitats.

What are the threats to the Djibouti francolin? Browsing of juniper seedlings by domestic stock is preventing regeneration as old trees die which is reducing the amount of suitable habitat for this species. Firewood collection, hunting and droughts are also implicated in the decline of this species.

What are you doing to save it? There are likely to be less than 500 individuals left in the wild, and there are none in captivity. Experimental exclusion of stock by fencing has demonstrated that the juniper has the capacity to regenerate, but this practice needs to be scaled up and maintained if it is to be beneficial. Effective action for this species requires the cooperation of shepherds and other local users of the forests. Research into its precise ecological requirements is also required. There is a case for establishing a captive population, using capacity outside Djibouti but in the region.

Find out more about Galliformes and their conservation

Discover more grouse, partridge, pheasant, quail and turkey species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and write a profile on why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight. Each nominee has its own profile on the Arkive blog with information on the species, who nominated them and why they are so special – click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite species to help get them into the top ten and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (7:59 GMT).

Name of species: Otter civet

Nominated by: Society for the Preservation of Endangered Carnivores & their International Ecological Study (S.P.E.C.I.E.S.)

Conservation status: Endangered

Why S.P.E.C.I.E.S. love the otter civet: It is a very unique carnivore, and too little is known about its habits other than it is very rare.

Threats to the otter civet’s survival: Unknown. Probably conversion of forest habitat and broader impacts on tropical watersheds from development activities.

Information on S.P.E.C.I.E.S.’s work with the otter civet: We have conducted numerous surveys in Borneo in cooperation with partners over the years and have yet to record this species. We are still looking for the ideal place to focus on them.

Find out more about other civet species on Arkive

 

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Sloth bear

Nominated by: IUCN Bear Specialist Group

Conservation status: Vulnerable

Why do you love it? This is the rebel bear: instead of a sleek shiny coat of a “normal” bear, the sloth bear has opted for a dishevelled, dull, shaggy look. Sloth bears mooch around in a zig-zag path, bowlegged, eyes fixed to the ground, like sulky teenagers.  Two sloth bears can be feeding near each other, and never look at each other.  Almost as a sign of being rebellious, a sloth bear will frequently have grass or leaves clinging to its coarse coat (it has no underfur).  Also clinging to its long coat, riding on its back are its cubs – it is the only bear that carries them around like this, to keep them safe from tigers.

This bear makes a living eating termites, sucking them up through the space where its two upper front teeth are missing.  It has very large protrusible lips that are used to create suction to extract termites from their colony, and long straight claws to dig into their hard mounds.  Often they can be heard, digging, blowing, huffing, and sucking well before they are seen.  They aren’t cute, but they are certainly a very unique bear and “Baloo” from Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book is a sloth bear!

What are the threats to the sloth bear? This bear is restricted to India (over 90 percent of its range), Nepal, and Sri Lanka. It can also live in scrubby habitats, and as such, can live close to people.  This is both good and bad:  As the habitat becomes degraded from cutting, grazing, and general overuse, sloth bears can still live there – as long as they can find termites and shade during the heat of the day.  But it is also bad because it brings them very close to people.  This is an aggressive bear (more aggressive than a grizzly bear), so attacks on people are common.  Therefore, most people living around sloth bears don’t like them.  As human populations have grown dramatically in India, habitat has become increasingly degraded, sloth bears and people have been forced to live near each other, attacks have become more frequent, and attitudes towards this species have become worse, leading to bears being killed more and more often.

What are you doing to save it? We have recently learned that this species has disappeared from Bangladesh.  It looks somewhat like an Asiatic black bear, so the continued existence of black bears in Bangladesh masked the disappearance of the sloth bear.  We then looked in Bhutan, where sloth bears also existed historically.  But, despite many reports of sloth bears, we found that they are extremely rare there.  We do not know if they were always rare, or if this is a new occurrence, because again, they are often confused with Asiatic black bears in places where these two species overlap.

Find out more about the work of the Bear SG

Discover more bear species on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Great white shark

Nominated by: Australian Marine Conservation Society

Conservation status: Vulnerable

Why do you love it? Magnificent. Maligned. Misunderstood. The great white shark has traditionally borne the brunt of negative media attention due to its exaggerated threat to human safety. Fished to near extinction around the world, great white numbers have steadily declined throughout the world’s oceans.

Charismatic, elusive and far ranging creatures, great whites are apex predators at the top of the food chain, crucial in maintaining the balance in marine ecosystems. They are intelligent and powerful creatures, but gravely misunderstood.

What are the threats to the great white shark? The great white faces many threats in Australian waters.  Sadly, the main threats are from humans. Great white sharks are long lived, slow growing and have few babies, making them particularly vulnerable to fishing impacts. Great whites are also a target of cruel and unnecessary shark control programs. In some parts of the world, great whites are fished for their jaws, fins and teeth in the gruesome ‘sport’ of trophy hunting.

What are you doing to save it? AMCS was pivotal in getting great white sharks protected in Australia and we continue to promote them as a species in need of protection.

In the 1990’s, AMCS escalated its campaign as part of the global battle to protect these amazing creatures. Rallying huge public support, the great white shark was protected in all Australian waters and is now listed as a vulnerable and migratory species under Australian environment law.

We drove governments to improve Australia’s leading document on shark conservation and management (the National Plan of Action – Sharks) by including actions that governments around the country had to enact to better protect sharks and ensuring conservation organisations have a say in how sharks are managed and protected.

AMCS created Australia’s Sustainable Seafood Guide, for those who love the oceans and their seafood. Now in print for a decade, the guide is available in paperback, as a dedicated consumer website and smartphone app. The guide encourages consumers to avoid fisheries with bycatch of great whites and other species of conservation concern.

AMCS launched a successful community campaign to ban live shark finning at sea. We continue to work towards a ban in the export and import of shark fins in Australia, to stop our involvement in this terrible trade.

When the Western Australian Government announced the introduction of a shark cull, they were unprepared for the public outcry. Working with conservation partners, AMCS ensured those voices were heard in the corridors of power, and the shark cull was shut down. AMCS continues to campaign on stopping shark control programs in other parts of Australia.

Find out more about the Australian Marine Conservation Society

Discover more sharks, skates and rays on Arkive

 

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