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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Sharks have been around for about 400 million years, long before dinosaurs even existed. They have survived five mass extinction events! Just keep swimming just keep swimming…

2) There are 355 confirmed species of shark, ranging in length from 15cm to 15m. Talk about little and large!

3) Hammerhead sharks are famous for their strange heads, which are actually designed to make them better hunters. The electrical sensors the sharks use to pinpoint their prey are spread out further, giving them much better prey detection skills.


4) Mako sharks are the fastest shark species in the ocean – these toothy torpedos can swim at speeds of up to 95km/h!

5) Lantern sharks can glow to disguise themselves in the deep ocean, and will emitting the same amount of light that shines from the ocean’s surface above them from their underside so that they don’t create a shadow. Basically, they have stealth mode – awesome!

6) Thresher sharks can use their super long tail fins to stun prey, similar to cracking them with a whip. The tail-whip also creates bubbles which can stun prey.


7) The babies of some shark species, such as the sand tiger shark, develop teeth in the womb and eat their unborn siblings. Sibling rivalry or what?!

8) A shark may go through over 20,000 teeth throughout its lifetime. The great white shark has up to 7 rows of teeth which are continually replaced with new ones.. yikes. Say cheese!


9) Greenland sharks are Earth’s longest-living vertebrates. Researchers recently discovered a 400-year old female by using radiocarbon dating.

10) A lot of people rightly avoid eating sharks, so fish markets and chefs change the name of shark meat to rock salmon, rock eel, huss or flake. Always make sure you know what you’re eating!

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Anemonefish are famous for their sea anemone homes. In exchange for safety from predators and food scraps, the clownfish drives off intruders and preens its host sea anemone, removing parasites.

2) Anemonefish are also known as clownfish due to the bold colour patterns on their body, which look a bit like a clown’s face paint.


3) It’s a layer of mucus on the anemonefish’s skin makes it immune to the anemone’s potentially lethal sting.

4) Anemonefish have to perform an elaborate dance with an anemone before taking up residence, gently touching the anemone’s tentacles with different parts of their bodies until they are both satisfied.

5) Strangely, all anemonefish eggs hatch as males, but when the female in the group dies, a dominant male undergoes a sex change and turns into a female.

6) Female anemonefish lay few hundred or thousand eggs, depending on the species, during the full moon. Eggs are attached onto rocks, where the male takes care of them until they hatch.

7) While the male ‘egg-sits’, he constantly fans water over the eggs to keep them oxygenate and may eat any eggs that are infertile or damaged by fungus to prevent the spread of disease or parasites.

8) After baby anemonefish hatch from their eggs, they drift into the open sea for 10 to 12 days, likely carried out by prevailing currents. But they often return to the near-shore reefs where they were born.


9) Anemonefish are often kept as pets, but sadly only survive for 3 to 5 years in aquariums, whereas wild individuals can live for up to 10 years.

10) Did you know that 90% of anemonefish sold in the aquarium trade are taken from the wild? This trade has led to the decimation of many wild tropical fish populations.

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Orcas are the most widely distributed of all whales and dolphins and are found in every ocean.

2) They are the largest member of the dolphin family.


3) Orcas were given the name ‘killer whale‘ by ancient sailors who used to see groups of them hunting and preying on whales, even the mighty blue whale!

4) The scientific name for orca is Orcinus orca. Orcinus translates to ‘of the kingdom of the dead’ and is probably derived from Roman God of the underworld Orcus, a reference to the fierce hunting reputation of this animal.


5) Not at all fussy eaters, orcas eat fish, great white sharks, rays, squid, crabs, lobsters, seals, sea lions, dugongs, seabirds, penguins, sea turtles and of course, whales. Quite the appetite!

6) Male orcas can grow to a maximum length of nearly 10m and weigh up to 10,000kg!

7) Because of the orca’s size, it is not preyed on by any other creature in the ocean, making it an apex predator – the largest apex predator on Earth, in fact.

8) Despite having such a fierce reputation, many orcas live with their mothers for their entire lives! Who doesn’t need their mums?


9) Orcas are very fast swimmers, and have been recorded at speeds of around 50kmh!

10) Orcas have developed many hunting tactics, one of which is to tail slap the water creating a tidal wave which knocks prey off of ice caps!

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Sea turtles have been roaming the Earth for 110 million years, once sharing the planet with T-Rex and other dinosaurs!

2) Sea turtles migrate thousands of kilometres in their lifetime through the oceans and high seas. One female leatherback turtle travelled more than 19,000km across the Pacific Ocean, from Indonesia to the USA and back!

3) A baby turtle’s sex is determined mostly by the temperatures of the sand they’re buried in, below 30˚C is usually male; and above 30˚C is usually female.

4) Green sea turtles can hold their breath for up to five hours, but their feeding dives usually only last five minutes or less, before they come back to the surface for air.

5) Sea turtles can detect the Earth’s magnetic field and use it as a compass to navigate long distances. Who needs Google Maps when you have built-in sat-nav!

6) The Hawaiian green sea turtle, known locally as ‘Honu’, symbolises good luck, endurance and long life. Hawaiians believe turtles can show up as a person’s guardian spirit, known as Aumakua, to guide the way home.

7) Green turtles are named for the layer of green fat that lies under their shell. Scientists believe this unusual quirky-coloured fat is a result of their veggie diet.

8) Sea turtles are super-strong swimmers, they propel through the water using their strong paddle-like flippers. While these awesome animals like to cruise along at around 3km/h, they can reach speeds of 35km/h if threatened!

9) A turtle’s shell is actually part of its skeleton, which is made up of over 50 bones that include the turtle’s rib cage and spine.

10) These cold-blooded creatures become sexually mature at around 20-30 years old, but often die before they reach 50 years old due to predation and no pension scheme. They do; however, enter the property ladder quite early, with their shells forming within the first 30 days of life.

 

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) The lion’s mane jellyfish has been on Earth since before the dinosaurs – they’ve been floating around in the ocean for around 650 million years.

2) This species earned its name from its red and yellow tentacles, which it has up to 1,200 of, that are very similar to the colour and structure of a lion’s mane (see image below)!

3) It can grow to over 2m wide, with tentacles up to 60m long – that’s longer than an Olympic-sized swimming pool!

4) Jellyfish have to digest their food really fast – if they didn’t they wouldn’t be able to float and would be weighed down by their dinner!

5) In an extreme example of one-size-fits-all, a jelly’s mouth is also its jet propulsion unit (cool!) and eh.. also its bum (gross!).

6) Like all jellies, the lion’s mane jellyfish has no brain, blood, or nervous system. Hold on, does that make it a zombie?!

 

 

7) As if having some of the same characteristics as a zombie wasn’t freaky enough, jellyfish can also clone themselves! Being asexual, they are able to create both eggs and sperm so they don’t need a mate to create any offspring.

8) The lion’s mane jellyfish is bioluminescent, meaning it has the ability to create its own light and glow in the dark.

9) Every animal needs a nemesis, and the lion’s mane jellyfish has a mortal enemy in the leatherback turtle that feeds almost exclusively on jellyfish.

10) This may surprise you, but you can actually eat jellyfish, and it’s been on the menu of Chinese, Korean and Japanese restaurants for some time! With jellyfish thriving in overfished areas, you might see it slipping onto your plate more frequently in the not-too-distant future!

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