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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
Feb 23

What makes for successful conservation? Sometimes, it takes a Hero.

For the past 11 years, Arkive has strived to build an unparalleled collection of the world’s best images and films of wildlife and habitats around the globe. Currently, Arkive shares the story of over 16,000 species with over 100,000 stunning photographs and film clips from our generous media contributors such as the BBC, Disney, Smithsonian Institute and over 6,000 enormously talented independent filmmakers and photographers. But there is another side of conservation that has yet to have its story told on Arkive. Our team is privileged to work with inspiring scientists, researchers, educators, and conservationists around the globe who have dedicated their lives to the conservation of nature both on a local and global scale. From creative and powerful cheetah conservation practices to independent filmmakers who trudge the Everglades on the weekends to capture rare and powerful footage, there are hundreds (maybe even thousands!) of conservation stories to share from the Heroes at the frontlines who are accomplishing measurable advances for conservation.

From reading about Heroes to becoming one yourself

Arkive is proud to present the official launch of the Arkive Conservation Heroes series. Over the next four weeks, we will feature four Heroes making incredible strides for species and habitats in their part of the world. Even more, each story in the Arkive Conservation Heroes series ends with a “wish list” of actual actions you, yes you, can take or pledge to take to support each Hero. We are asking each reader to pledge to at least one wish list action which range from sharing a Heroes story socially to help spread the word further to donating or even planning to volunteer time with the hero him or herself! The first Arkive Conservation Heroes series will launch this week with the following incredible line-up:

Dr. Laurie Marker

Dr. Laurie Marker and CCF Resident Cheetahs Resize

 (Photo courtesy of CCF)

Dr. Laurie Marker is the founder and executive director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) dedicated to saving the cheetah in the wild. Dr. Marker helped to develop the US and international captive cheetah breeding program. Her past work includes collaborating with the National Zoo and National Cancer Institute, to help identify the cheetah’s lack of genetic variation : Published February 26, 2015

Dr. Alessandro Catenazzi

Ale 4

Dr. Alessandro Catenazzi is an assistant professor at the University of Southern Illinois-Carbondale in the zoology department who, along with his team, recently discovered a new species of water frog, Telmatobius ventriflavum, in central Peru! His current research focuses on the systematics and conservation of Neotropical amphibians and reptiles, and the ecological dimensions of biodiversity: Published March 5, 2015

Subir Chowfin

subir chowfin (1) Subir Chowfin , is a wildlife researcher and a local hero for the region of Uttarakhand. He and his mother Christine Margaret Chowfin worked to forever protect 450 hectares of local forest land on the Gadoli and Manda Khal Fee Simple Estates in India that is home to as many as 78 species of flowering plants, birds, and mammals including leopards. The next step for Subir and his mother is to set up a Field Centre for Ecology and Habitat Restoration on these estates: Published March 12, 2015

Rich & Richard Kern

Kerns promo portrait Resize

Dynamic father/son duo, Rich & Richard Kern, are co-founders of Odyssey Earth producing stunning films of Florida wildlife and ecosystems. Their goal? To bring the wild of the Florida wilderness to school children to hopefully inspire the next generation of conservationists in the sunshine state: Published March 19, 2015

The Arkive Team is incredibly excited to bring these stories to you and even more excited to see how our incredible community of over 1 million monthly Arkive visitors can come together to take real action in support of these Heroes. To start, help  support these amazing individuals by sharing this blog via Facebook or Twitter and follow #ArkConservationHeroes to stay up-to-date!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA  

Feb 20

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News  ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Feb 13, 2015

Male black widows smell hungry cannibal females

Black-widow-female-showing-distinctive-red-egg-timer-shaped-markings-on-abdomen

Female black widow

Female black widows only eat courting males about 2% of the time. However, just in case, males can smell how peckish a female is just from the pheromones in her silk.

View original article

  Article originally published on Saturday, Feb 14, 2015

 Wildlife: Southwest wolf populations tops 100 for first time in modern era

Mexican-wolf-portrait

Mexican wolf portrait

The Mexican wolf population in New Mexico and Arizona has grown by 31% to  109 individuals total.

View original article

  Article originally published on Sunday, Feb 15, 2015

 Increasing number of stranded sea lion pups being rescued this year

Female-California-sea-lion-on-rock

Female sea lion

So far 185 sea lion pups have been rescued in 2015 in the San Diego area. Stranded pups are nursed back to health and once healthy released into the wild.

View original article

   Article originally published on Monday, Feb 16, 2015

 Cold-blooded animals grow bigger in the warm on land, but smaller in warm water

Velvet-swimming-crab

Velvet swimming crab

Arthropods like crabs and insects, grow larger on land in warmer climates. Moreover, researchers hypothesize that reduced oxygen availability in water causes aquatic animals to reduce their body size more.

View original article

Golden-ringed-dragonfly

Golden-ringed dragonfly

 Article originally published on Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015

 42 pangolins rescued…then sold to restaurant

Sunda-pangolin-side-view

Sunda pangolin

On Feb. 1, local Vietnamese police seized 42 live Sunda pangolins from poachers. Police handed them over to forest rangers who in turn ended up selling them to restaurants for a reported $56 a kilo.

View original article

  Article originally published on Wednesday, Feb 18, 2015

Grizzly bears are waking up too early

Brown-bear-walking-Alaskan-population

Brown bear walking

Grizzly bears are emerging from their dens a month early according to Yellowstone Park officials. The warmer weather appears to be the reason for the grizzlies’ altered schedule.

View original article

  Article originally published on Thursday, Feb 19, 2015

Great white sharks are late bloomers

Great-white-shark-swimming-anterior-view

Great white shark swimming

Male great white sharks take 26 years to reach sexual maturity. This differs significantly from the previous estimate that suggested that males reached maturity between 4 and 10 years of age.

View original article

 Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

Feb 18

Happy Chinese New Year everyone!

Each year a different animal is chosen from the Chinese zodiac to represent the year with symbols rotating on a 12 year cycle. The animals of the Chinese zodiac are the rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, rooster, dog, and pig.

This year happens to be the year of the Goat! Celebrate the Chinese Year with Arkive’s magnificent selection of goat videos. :) It’s time for the Goat video Countdown!!

 

5. Mother Ibex and Calves Adventure

Nubian ibex infants with female, in habitat

What could be more adorable than a mother and her two infants? As the story unfolds a female Nubian ibex walks across the rocky landscape, her two curious calves exploring the surrounding areas. However, they never stray too far from the ever watchful eye of their mother. After a long day of trekking, mother and calves take a much deserved rest.

 

4. Playtime, what playtime

Juvenile male walia ibex sparring

They grow up so fast. The playfulness of youth prepares these juvenile male walia ibex for the fighting that adult life will bring. These juveniles spar continually taking breaks as they prepare to charge toward each other. After a hard day of sparring a brief reprieve is in order, even hard-headed goats need a break.

 

3. King of the Hill

Nubian ibex males fighting

 

When it comes to fighting, these adult male Nubian ibex mean business. One can hear the hearty thwacks as their heads and impressive backward arching horn collide. When it comes to goats there is only one way to show dominance, the signature headbutt. Fortunately their thick skulls prevent damage and the match ends in a hard-fought stalemate.

 

2. A day in the life of a Markhor

Markhor – overview

A beautiful mountainous scene welcomes us as we gaze upon the Markhor’s habitat. There’s a little bit for everyone like thrills as the Markhor scales a steep mountainside. Or action galore as a male engages in battle with another. One cannot help, but admire this imposing goat.

 

1. Oh love, where art thou?

Male walia ibex testing female’s receptiveness

 

A tale of romance unfolds as the male walia ibex approaches prospective females. Alas the females are not receptive and his affections are not reciprocated. Unfortunately, this tale ends sadly as the male is unable to find a partner and left to lament his fortune. There’s always the next Valentine’s Day.

Happy Chinese New Year and be sure to share which video is your favorite in the comments below!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

Feb 13

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

The following article was originally published on Friday, Feb 6, 2015.

 Giant clam = giant impact: study compiles how mega-clams impact seas

Fluted-clam-showing-shell-shape

Fluted clam showing shell shape

Giant clam on reef

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Young giant clams serve as a food source for many species, but some like the fluted clam also serve as habitats for other organisms. Moreover, dense concentrations of the small giant clam can even create small islands called mapiko.

View original article

Small giant clam

 

The following article was originally published on Saturday, Feb 7, 2015.

Frontline teams ‘unaware’ of wildlife smuggler tactics

Javan rhinoceros in shallows of river

African elephant family

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 An important step in fighting wildlife trafficking is educating freight forwarders and handlers of air, ship, and land cargoes. When disguised it is often difficult to identify horns and tusks, that belong to rhinos and elephants, respectively.

View original article

 

The following article was originally published on Sunday, Feb 8, 2015.

Washington state mulls ban on capture of killers whales for entertainment

Orca pair underwater

 

Currently 57 orcas are in captivity in 14 marine parks in eight countries. Of those captive orcas, 25 are in SeaWorld parks in Texas, California, and Florida.

View original article

The following article was originally published on Monday, Feb 9, 2015.

Pollinator collapse could lead to a rise in malnutrition

Female common carder bumblebee feeding from flower

A pollinator collapse could increase nutrient deficiency across local populations by up to 56% in Zambia, Bangladesh, Uganda and Mozambique. While most of the spotlight falls on bees other pollinators like butterflies and wasps are also of grave importance.

View original article

Common wasp carrying food to nest

Monarch butterfly resting on a flowering plant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The following article was originally published on Tuesday, Feb 10, 2015.

Recently discovered, critically endangered bird gets its first reserve

Araripe manakin in habitat

Discovered in 1998, the Araripe Manakin has received 140 acres of land for a reserve. There are only 800 extant individuals who live within Brazil’s Chapado do Araripe.

View original article

The following article was originally published on Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015.

Drones may aid bird studies without ruffling feathers

Common greenshank hunting

greater flamingo coming in to land

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Researchers tested how flamingos and common greenshanks reacted to drones. They found that birds became agitated if the drone swooped down toward them as opposed to flying overhead. It might prove useful for birds that inhabit areas inaccessible to humans.

View original article

The following article was originally published on Thursday, Feb 12, 2015.

The gray wolf spotted near the Grand Canyon this fall has already been killed by a hunter

Eurasian wolf side view

Coyote walking through snow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last year, a gray wolf was spotted near the Grand Canyon, which had not happened in decades. Unfortunately, in late December this same wolf was killed by a hunter who mistook it for a coyote.

View original article

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

Feb 6

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

The following article was originally published on Friday, Jan 30, 2015.

Successful strawberry frog dads die young

Strawberry poison frog, side profile

Researchers have found that male strawberry poison frogs who raise more offspring have a reduced longevity. They believe that the direct involvement in raising clutches contributes to a shorter lifespan.

View original article

 The following article was originally published on Saturday, Jan 31, 2015.

Whales hear through their bones, San Diego study finds

Southern right whale

The skulls of at least some baleen whales have acoustic properties that capture the energy of low frequencies and direct it to their ear bones. These findings might help legislators decide on limits to oceanic man-made noise.

View original article

 The following article was originally published on Sunday, Feb 1, 2015.

Planting drone to fight deforestation

Collecting seeds of a native tree species for reforestation

The first step is for the a drone to gather mapping data for areas chosen for reforestation. The second step is for the “planting” drone to propel biodegradable seedpods to the ground, which contains germinated seeds and necessary nutrients

View original article

The following article was originally published on  Monday, Feb 2, 2015.

Sometimes, protecting one species harms another

Humphead parrotfish

The humphead parrotfish is considered a vulnerable species that must be protected. However, they thrive in abundance at Palmyra Atoll where they consume dangerously large amounts of coral. It poses the question of how to protect both species.

View original article

The following article was originally published on Tuesday, Feb 3, 2015.

Bringing rhinos back to Uganda, one calf at a time

Southern white rhinoceros

Rhinos were completely wiped out in Uganda by 1982. In 2005, however, six southern white rhinos were introduced to the Zhiwa Rhino Sanctuary. There are now fifteen rhinos.

View original article

The following article was originally published on Wednesday, Feb 4, 2015.

Tiger populations in Nepal can’t grow without more food and space

Bengal tiger portrait

Nepal has set a goal of having at least 250 Bengal tigers within its borders by 2022. Anti-poaching efforts, however, may not be enough since a recent study suggests that the tigers in Nepal lack the food and space to allow further population growth.

View original article

The following article was originally published on Thursday, Feb 5, 2015.

Rare pink pigeons baffled by ‘signal-jamming’ doves

Pink pigeon side profile

A new study found that pink pigeons mistake the calls of Madagascan turtle doves for rival male pink pigeons. Their mistake causes them to waste energy and may be one the reasons pink pigeons have failed to recolonize more of Mauritius.

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

 

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