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Here at Arkive, we provide the ultimate multimedia guide to endangered species, and through our blog we’ll keep you up to date with news from the world of wildlife videos, photography and conservation, alongside the latest on our quest to locate imagery of the planet’s most wanted plants and animals.
May 22

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, May 15, 2015

The war on India’s tiger preserves

Bengal-tiger-portrait

Bengal tiger

The government of India provides funds to help willing residents move out of protected tiger habitat and onto nearby farmland.  At times, however, factors working against tigers include luxury resort chains that want to build “ecotourism” lodges that do not allow tigers to live nearby. Other times, it is mining companies that wish to move deeper into protected areas.

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Article originally published on Saturday, May 16, 2015

Controversial bear hunt awaits final approval from Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

American-black-bear-scratching-head

American black bear scratching head

Florida is awaiting approval to host its first bear hunt in 20 years. The hunt is considered a method of controlling the bear population, since Florida has seen an increase in human-bear conflicts. Opponents of the bear hunt note that improperly secured food/trash attracts bears and that people should focus on trash management and not on hunts.

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Article originally published on Sunday, May 17, 2015

Wildlife experts counteract fallacies about coyotes

Adult-coyote

Adult coyote

Two recent coyote attacks in Bergen county, New Jersey have brought this canid to the forefront of the conversation about wildlife. Wildlife experts stress that while coyotes are predators, they very rarely attack humans. They also informed the public that coyotes are not the top carriers of rabies in the area. Most importantly, coyotes play a vital role in the ecosystem by controlling rodent populations.

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Article originally published on Monday, May 18, 2015

Fuzzy ducklings are the future of this Hawaiian species

Male-Laysan-duck

Male Laysan duck

The Laysan duck is a critically endangered bird endemic to Hawaii that in 1911 had fewer than 20 birds due to invasive rats. Conservation efforts brought the population back to almost 1,000 birds, but 40 percent of them were lost in 2011 due to the Japan Tsunami. In 2014, however 28 young Laysan ducks were moved to Kure Atoll State Wildlife Sanctuary in an effort to establish a population on Kure.

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Article originally published on Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Giant panda gut bacteria can’t efficiently digest bamboo

Giant-panda-eating-bamboo

Giant panda eating bamboo

The giant panda is known for primarily eating bamboo, but the microbiota it harbors in its stomach actually resembles that which is found in carnivores, a recent study found. It poses a conundrum since pandas spend up to 14 hours a day consuming up to 12.5 kg of bamboo leaves and stems, yet can only digest 17 percent of it.

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Article originally published on Wednesday, May 20, 2015

EU concerned about farming impact on its wildlife

Skylark-portrait

Skylark

In the EU major threats to grasslands, wetlands, and dune habitats were overgrazing, fertilization and pesticides. Fifteen percent of birds in the EU are near threatened or in decline including once common birds such as the skylark.

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Article originally published on Thursday, May 21, 2015

Photos from the front: the California oil spill in pictures

Adult-gray-whale-breaching

Adult gray whale breaching

On Tuesday, an underground oil pipeline burst near Goleta, California spilling crude oil into the Pacific. Whales and sea lions were spotted in the area where the spill occurred.  It is estimated that 21,000 gallons of crude oil entered the ocean.

View original article

Young-California-sea-lion

Young California sea lion

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

May 20

Join us in celebrating Arkive’s 12th birthday by checking out these 12 species that have been downlisted on the IUCN red list!

 

Costa Rica brook frog

Costa Rica brook frog photo

Costa Rica brook frog, clinging to a stem

Through conservation work, such as translocation, and biological research the Costa Rica brook frog was downlisted from critically endangered to endangered in 2013.

 

Rodrigues fody

Rodrigues fody photo

Male Rodrigues fody

With protections put in to place for the island of Rodrigues watersheds, it allowed surrounding forests to mature and recover. This, among many other factors have helped the Rodrigues fody, get downlisted from vulnerable to near threatened in 2013.

 

Black-footed albatross

Black-footed albatross photo

Black-footed albatross looking towards camera

The black-footed albatross, currently still under the threat from by-catch, yet with conservation efforts, it has been downlisted from vulnerable to near threatened in 2013.

 

Red-cockaded woodpecker

Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight

Red-cockaded woodpecker photo

There are many conservation actions in place in the red-cockaded woodpecker, in 2013 it was downlisted from vulnerable to near threatened.

 

Island fox

Island fox photo

Island fox yawning

Through captive breedings and reintroduction programs, in 2013 the island fox was downlisted from critically endangered to near threatened.

 

Rodrigues warbler

Rodrigues warbler photo

Rodrigues warbler front view

With continuous work and efforts, in 2013 the Rodrigues warbler was downlisted from endangered to near threatened.

 

Cactus (Discocactus horstii)

Cactus (Discocactus horstii) photo

Wild Discocactus horstii

With strict protections placed on the Cactus (Discocactus horstii), it was downlisted from endangered to vulnerable in 2013.

 

Black-browed albatross

Black-browed albatross

Black-browed albatross courtship

The greatest threat of the black-browed albatross is by-catch, yet with continued work and monitoring, in 2013 it was downlisted from endangered to near threatened.

 

Lear’s macaw

Lear's macaw photo

Pair of Lear’s macaws

With protections efforts and conservation work there has a steady increase in the Lear’s macaw population and in 2009 it was downlisted from critically endangered to endangered.

 

Black lion tamarin

Black lion tamarin photo

Black lion tamarin

Translocating the black lion tamarin, among many other efforts, helped with decrease of inbreeding depression. In 2008, the black lion tamarin was downlisted from critically endangered to endangered.

 

Przewalski’s horse

Przewalski's horse photo

Group of Przewalski’s horses running

Through captive breeding and and reintroduction programs, in 2008 the Przewalski’s horse was downlisted from critically endangered to endangered.

 

Black-footed ferret

Black-footed ferret photo

Black-footed ferret infant

With a very successful captive-breeding program and through many other efforts, the black-footed ferret was downlisted from extinct in the wild to endangered.

 

As you read through all of the fantastic success stories you might have noticed that some of the IUCN listings need to be updated on Arkive. Well, we are happy to say that Arkive will be going through a huge update soon and their statuses will be updated.

We hope that next year, we have even more success stories to share with you!

 

Happy 12th birthday Arkive!!

Ariadne Pineda, Arkive Production Coordinator, Wildscreen USA

 

 

May 19

The prestigious Whitley Awards is hosted by the Whitley Fund for Nature which offers awards and grants to outstanding nature conservationists around the world. These awards aim to accelerate the career paths of recipients by helping them raise their profiles, network, and inspire others.

This year’s Whitley Awards were held on April 29, 2015. The Arkive Team had the amazing opportunity to interview some of this year’s winners whose work focuses on several species ranging from tiny tamarins to gigantic gorillas.

The winners were all asked the same question: How is winning the Whitley Award going to help your ongoing projects?

Pramod Patil

Pramod Patil crop

Pramod Patil (© Whitley Fund for Nature)

India – Community conservation of the great Indian bustard in the Thar Desert, India: a landscape-level approach

Great-Indian-bustard-males-in-territorial-displayWell, currently I work in six Indian states, but I feel that the Thar Desert in Rajasthan is the most important landscape for the long term conservation of great Indian bustards. We are going to use this funding specifically in the Thar Desert to work with the communities. Our prime targets are to work with the communities in different ways such as awareness, capacity building, then networking and also empowering the forest department to conduct anti-poaching activities effectively.

Ananda Kumar

Ananda Kumar crop

Ananda Kumar (© Whitley Fund for Nature)

India – Elephant messengers: using innovative communication systems to enable human-elephant coexistence in southern India

Indian-elephants-play-fightingWe are trying to strengthen out elephant information network and develop early warning systems for the people to send us elephant information in at once so that fatalities due to elephants can be substantially reduced. This will be done in collaboration with the state forest department and the plantation companies, corporate sector, farmers, and people who are working in tea and coffee estates. It’s a collective effort. The Nature Conservation Foundation, where I work, cannot do it alone. We really need to take different people along with us, different stakeholders.  This will lead to a lot of positive results.

Arnaud Desbiez

Arnaud Desbiez crop

Arnaud Desbiez (© Whitley Fund for Nature)

Brazil – Giant armadillos as a flagship species for the conservation of tropical scrublands in the Cerrado

Giant-armadilloThe Whitley Awards is going to make a huge difference for our project. It recognizes a team effort. It’s going to help us expand the project from the pantanal, the world’s largest wetland,  to the Cerrado, an environment which is scrublands and forests .What we’re going to do in the Cerrado is look for the last populations of the giant armadillo. That is important because thanks to our outreach and communications work with the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso, giant armadillos have been declared as one of the indicator species for protected areas. So the state is using a system with a lot of indicator species of plants, bats and birds, and for mammals giant armadillos are one of five indicator species. So we really need to get out there and map the distribution of these last animals which could create protected areas.

Inaoyom Imong

Inaoyom Imong crop

Inaoyom Imong (© Whitley Fund for Nature)

Nigeria – Saving Cross River gorillas through community-based conservation in the Mbe Mountains

Western-lowland-gorilla-sitting-in-clearingThis award is for the communities I work with, those close to gorillas that have the commitment to protect the forest and these gorillas. The award has come at an excellent time. Right now I am working with other communities providing the support that they need to enforce local laws that they have made themselves to protect their resources. I want to create awareness among local people, especially in helping them acquire the skills they need to pursue alternative livelihoods that are more sustainable. So winning this award will help me to expand on all of these efforts. It means having more effective communication with more communities, more people and better protecting the forest and gorillas living around these communities.

Panut Hadisiswoyo

Panut Hadisiswoyo crop

Panut Hadisiswoyo (© Whitley Fund for Nature)

Indonesia – Conservation villages: building local capacity for the protection of Sumatran orangutans and their habitat, Indonesia

sumatran-orangutan-with-youngOur big project is saving the orangutan habitat, saving the forest and saving the orangutans from extinction. I actually want to expand our approach in working with local people to establish more conservation villages where we tackle the root causes of deforestation and forest degradation. So we want to introduce sustainable farming and livelihoods to local communities. There are alternatives to their livelihoods that will not destroy the rainforest. Our ultimate goal is to alleviate pressures on the forest by developing alternatives for the local communities.  Secondly, I want to restore the degraded habitat of the orangutan in the protected areas by planting trees and improving the understanding of locals. Third, I want to educate the people about the importance of rainforest protection and orangutans. People represent hope. I still really believe that local people want to protect the remaining forest. That makes me feel more encouraged that hope is still there and people actually want to do good things.

 Rosamira Guillen

Rosamira Guillen crop

Rosamira Guillen (© Whitley Fund for Nature)

Colombia – Proyecto Tití: expanding conservation efforts to protect the cotton-top tamarin in northern Colombia

cotton-headed-tamarin-crouched-on-branchFor the last 15 years we have been in one area within the distribution of cotton-top tamarins in Colombia and we’ve been wanting for a long time to expand to other locations. So our specific mission with the support we are getting from the Whitley Awards is to reach these places and start working with the people there.  Because with more support we can continue expanding to more places in the future and reach further with our conservation work. Specifically, there is this area called San Juan which is about two hours away from where we are right now and that is out next focus for conserving cotton-top tamarins in Colombia.

These amazing individuals have already achieved so much for conservation and through the Whitley Awards are able to advance their work further. Their inspirational work truly embodies the essence of what it means to be a conservation hero. The Arkive Team congratulates all of the winners and hopes that Arkive’s followers are inspired to find their inner conservation hero.

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

May 16

Take Arkive's User Survey and Win!

While we here on the Arkive Team like to think we know a thing or two about creating and sharing one of the world’s largest collections of wildlife images, films, and information, the truth is there are far greater experts out there who know the top ways to engage and inspire people to care and learn about the natural world …

You!

We have some exciting new ideas for Arkive to run by you. We also want to get to know you a little more to be sure Arkive still meets your expectations as an authoritative, valuable, and free resource for all.

Please click on the survey link below to access a 5 minute or less survey and share your vision for the future of Arkive.

User Survey button

Sir David Attenborough

To thank you for your help, each survey participant can elect to be entered into a drawing for a Sir David Attenborough-signed book! Who wouldn’t want that treasure on their bookshelf?

Thanks in advance for your help and input; it is greatly appreciated!

The Arkive Team

May 15

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, May 8, 2015

Researchers find treasure trove of unique, threatened animals in Philippine forest

Palawan-hornbill-perched

Palawan hornbill perched

Researchers are attempting to declare Palawan’s Cleopatra’s Needle Forest Reserve a critical habitat. To be considered a critical habitat the area must support high biodiversity and the animals and plants that live in it must be threatened. Some of the unique species in Palawan include the Palawan bearded pig and the Palawan hornbill.

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Palawan-bearded-pig

Palawan bearded pig

Article originally published on Saturday, May 9, 2015

Black bears chase visitors in Yellowstone National Park

American-black-bear-cinnamon-morph-female-with-cinnamon-and-black-cubs

American black bear, female with cubs

A black bear and her three cubs surprised tourists last week when they appeared on a bridge lined with sightseers. Jack Hanna, director emeritus of the Columbus Zoo, said that “It’s a beautiful animal we can all enjoy. It’s their home. Treat them with respect…”

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Article originally published on Sunday, May 10, 2015

Threat of listing the sage grouse as endangered may be enough to protect the bird

Male-greater-sage-grouse-displaying

Male greater sage-grouse displaying

Simply mentioning the consideration of listing the greater sage grouse as endangered has been enough to raise $424 million since 2010 for restoration and 4.4 million acres of habitat have been conserved.  A loss of habitat and fragmentation has been the primary cause of their decline.

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Article originally published on May 11, 2015

Rhino poaching continues unabated in South Africa

Southern-white-rhinoceros

Southern white rhinoceros

South Africa has already lost 393 rhinos this year. Eighty percent of the world’s rhino population resides in South Africa. Crime syndicates appear to be responsible for the poaching fuelled by a demand for their horns.

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Article originally published on May 12, 2015

The triumph of the bison: Europe’s biggest animal bounces back a century after vanishing

European-bison-resting

European bison resting

In 1927, the European bison became completely extinct in the wild, but since then has made an amazing recovery with over 5,000 bison in existence today. The European bison is found in nine countries, as far west as Germany and as far east as Russia. The most recent country to welcome back the bison was Romania where it had vanished in 1862.

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Article originally published on May 13, 2015

Fewer shark are being caught – and that’s not good news

Blue-shark

Blue shark

Shark catches are down 20 percent from their peak in 2003. In 2003, fishing fleets netted 900,000 metric tons of shark. Unfortunately, however, one of the reasons that shark catches have decreased is simply because there are less sharks.

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Article originally published on Thursday, May 14, 2015

South African Airways bans all wildlife trophies from flights

Caracal-cub

Caracal cub

SAA chose to ban all wildlife trophies on their flights after wildlife traffickers attempted to smuggle ivory to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Species targeted by hunters range from crocodiles to caracals and baboons.

View original article

Young-southern-chacma-baboon-sitting

Young southern chacma baboon sitting

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

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