Mar 6

Sometimes, an honest and heartfelt story of how one person connected to a quiet space in nature can be a welcome reminder to embark on our own explorations now and then. The following story from Shamim Graff, a volunteer and frequent visitor to Lake Katharine, shares why these 85 acres have meant the world to her as part of our Going WILD in Illinois series. 

My Woods

Tucked away between highways and a sanitary canal lies the 85 acres that make up Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens in south suburban Chicago. When I first started getting to know the area, I had no idea that such a place could exist out of view of the busy city streets. I had grown up never more than a mile from open land, so the idea of a large natural area in the city was very foreign. My first visit to Lake Katherine found me strolling along the south side of the lake with my finance and his parents. I couldn’t have known the kind of connection I would soon form with Lake Katherine.

The American bullfrog, white-tailed deer, and eastern cottontail can occasionally be spotted at the Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens

As I began graduate school, I visited again, this time to talk with staff about some projects I was interested in doing if they were agreeable to them. I found myself spending more time at Lake Katherine, usually doing project work and not leaving much time for exploration. But I enjoyed coming and it was always a treat to be able to watch sunsets over the lake before heading home.

Lake Katherine Sunset

Lake Katherine sunset

Needing more time to connect with nature, I again started taking an occasional walk around the lake or a short hike down some of the other trails. One spring afternoon, I found myself alone on the east trails, a little-visited area of the park.

LK - Eastern Trail LK - Upper Eastern Trail

As I walked through the woods, I at once felt deeply connected to them in that place in that moment. These were my woods and they were inviting me in.

Shamin Graff, Volunteer, Lake Katherine Nature Center and Botanic Gardens

I think we’d all like to be invited for a walk in those woods with you, Shamim! Thanks so much for sharing such a touching and personal story of a time you connected with the WILD in Illinois. See if you find yourself invited into the IL natural world while exploring our new Illinois feature page!

Sep 5

Europe’s towns and cities are particularly vulnerable to the threats posed by invasive alien species, and experts say that action needs to be taken to control them.

Close up photo of a northern raccoon

Native to North America, the northern raccoon is an invasive species in parts of Europe

Invasive alien species are plants or animals that are not native to an area and which therefore lack natural predators, meaning they are able to spread rapidly.

Urban areas are at high risk from invasive species because of their large number of transport links, with many non-native animals and plants arriving accidentally at ports and airports. Some species also arrive through the plant and pet trades.

Threats to native wildlife

Invasive alien species can pose a significant threat to native wildlife, often through competition or predation.

Photo of red-eared slider ssp. elegans on rock

Abandoned pet turtles such as the red-eared slider can threaten native turtle species

According to Chantal van Ham, European Programme Officer for IUCN, “These non-indigenous species represent one of the main threats to the world’s biodiversity. This threat is set to increase unless meaningful action is taken to control their introduction and establishment.”

Non-native species can also cause problems for humans living in urban areas. For example, common ragweed, which is native to North America, is spreading rapidly across Europe and can cause hay fever and asthma-like symptoms. Other plants, such as Japanese knotweed, can cause structural damage to buildings.

IUCN conference

IUCN has recently released a publication entitled Invasive Alien Species: The Urban Dimension, which lists case studies from more than 15 European countries which show action being taken on invasive species in urban areas.

Photo of harlequin ladybird

The harlequin ladybird is an invasive insect that threatens native species in Europe and elsewhere

To address the issues posed by invasive alien species in Europe, IUCN is also hosting a conference today in Gland, Switzerland. The aim of the conference is to bring together local authorities, scientists, NGOs and policymakers to analyse the problem of invasive species in urban areas, and to discuss potential solutions.

Chantal van Ham said that local authorities have a key role to play in taking action to reduce the risk of invasive species becoming established. However, she added that it will be important for local authorities to have the support they need to do this.

European action

Photo of American bullfrog sitting on grass at the water's edge

The American bullfrog has been named one of the top 100 most invasive alien species in the world by IUCN

Next week, the European Commission is expected to publish its plans on tackling invasive species across Europe and to announce a legal framework which will require action to be taken on the issue in all EU member states. It will also look at the control methods which are available and the ways in which established invasive species populations can be managed.

 

Read more on this story at BBC News – Invasive alien species threaten urban environments and IUCN – Invasive alien species: the urban dimension.

You can also find out more about invasive species at the GB Non-native Species Secretariat and the IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group.

Do you teach 11-14 year olds? Take a look at the invasive species teaching resource on ARKive’s education pages!

Liz Shaw, ARKive Text Author

About

RSS feedArkive.org is the place for films, photos and facts about endangered species. Subscribe to our blog today to keep up to date!

Email updates

Sign up to receive a regular email digest of Arkive blog posts.
Preferred frequency:

Arkive twitter

Twitter: ARKive