Jul 26

Male mountain nyalas (Tragelaphus buxtoni)

Species: Mountain nyala (Tragelaphus buxtoni)

Status: Endangered (EN)

Interesting Fact: The male mountain nyala is larger than the female, and has long, spiralling horns, which may grow to 118 centimetres long. As the male matures, the tips of its horns develop an ivory colouration.

More information: The mountain nyala is an elegant and rather attractively marked antelope and is endemic to the highlands of Ethiopia, where it is found to the southeast of the Rift Valley. Most active in the evening and early morning, the mountain nyala browses on bushes, trees and herbs, and will also take grasses, ferns, aquatic plants and lichens. Individuals often shelter in dense cover such as woodland and heather during periods of extreme cold or heat, and the attractive markings may help to conceal individuals from predators by breaking up its outline.

The mountain nyala population has undergone a substantial decline in recent decades, and has decreased from an estimated 7,000 to 8,000 individuals in the 1960s to perhaps fewer than 4,000 today. The range of the mountain nyala has been reduced dramatically, and the remaining populations have become fragmented, which has made them particularly vulnerable to population declines. The main threats to the mountain nyala come from the negative effects of human activities throughout its range, with increasing human and livestock populations putting ever-increasing pressure on this species through illegal hunting, competition with cattle and predation by domestic dogs, as well as habitat clearance for agriculture, grazing, firewood harvesting, and settlement. Despite being fully protected by law, enforcement of legislation is generally absent, and the mountain nyala is only effectively protected within a small area in the north of Bale Mountains National Park. The mountain nyala is a flagship species for conservation in Bale Mountains National Park, but its future survival will depend on increased protection from illegal activities, and action to reduce or manage human utilisation of the park.

See images and videos of the mountain nyala on Arkive.

Find out more about the wildlife of Ethiopia on Arkive.

Read about the Saint Louis Zoo’s project to conserve the mountain nyala.

Ben Hogan, Wildscreen ARKive PIPS Intern

Mar 1
Female addax and young

Addax (Addax nasomaculatus)

Species: Addax (Addax nasomaculatus)

Status: Critically Endangered (CR)

Interesting Fact: An addax is able to obtain all the water it requires from the food it consumes.

The addax is a desert antelope that is well adapted to its harsh habitat. It has splayed hooves that help it to travel more easily across sand. Its short, glossy coat is grey-brown in winter, fading to almost white during the summer, and both sexes possess the distinctive long, twisted horns.

These antelope are mainly active during the night. In the day, they dig ‘beds’ into the sand in shady areas to avoid the heat of the desert sun, which also shelters them from sandstorms. Small nomadic herds of this species spend the majority of their time wandering in search of food. These herds previously contained around 20 individuals, but today they are found in groups of four or less.

Once found across northern Africa, wild addax populations now only exist in a fragment of their former range. This dramatic decrease is mainly attributed to over-hunting, as their meat and leather is prized by local people. Other factors contributing to their decline include desertification, drought and habitat encroachment. It is estimated that fewer than five hundred individuals survive in the wild today, with the bulk of these found between the Termit region in eastern Niger and the Bodélé region in western Chad.

International trade of the addax is prohibited and the Sahara Conservation Fund has developed a regional strategy to protect the remaining wild populations and facilitate the re-colonisation of suitable habitats. A protected population exists in the Yotvata Hai-Bar Nature Reserve in Israel that was set up in 1968 to bolster populations of endangered desert species. There are currently around 2,000 individuals in captivity around the world that are being used in reintroduction programmes in Tunisia and Morocco.

Find out more about the addax at the Sahara Conservation Fund and WildAddax.

See images and videos of the addax on ARKive.

Phoebe Shaw Stewart, ARKive Text Author

About

RSS feedArkive.org is the place for films, photos and facts about endangered species. Subscribe to our blog today to keep up to date!

Email updates

Sign up to receive a regular email digest of Arkive blog posts.
Preferred frequency:

Arkive twitter

Twitter: ARKive