Jul 3

Over 200 hundred years ago, the United States declared its independence and became its own sovereign nation. Often celebrated in America with BBQs and fireworks, the universal color scheme for any gathering today includes red, white and blue.  We thought we’d celebrate the 4th of July here at Arkive… but with our own wildlife twist!

Check out our favorite red, white and blue wildlife mascots for Independence Day this year!

RED – North Pacific giant octopus

Photo of North Pacific giant octopus

We could actually put the North Pacific giant octopus under the red and the white category since the species contains special pigment cells in the skin called chromatophores that, when activated, cause the octopus mantle to change colors from red to white. True to its name, the North Pacific giant octopus is the largest of all octopus species and can be found off the entire Pacific coast of the US.

White – Polar bear

Photo of Polar bear

The most well-known of all bears, the polar bear is immediately recognisable from the distinctive white colour of its thick fur. Did you know that the only unfurred parts of the body are the foot pads and the tip of its nose? The largest land carnivore, the polar bear calls the snowy habitat of Alaska home.

Blue – Blue whale

Photo of Blue whale

Despite its common name, the blue whale is actually grayish-blue and can even have a yellowish tinge caused by microscopic algae called ‘diatoms’. The blue whale is found in every ocean in the world except the Arctic!

Can you name some other North American RED, WHITE and BLUE animals?  Feel free to name some in the comments section and take a look to see if you can find them in the Arkive website.

From Arkive, we hope you have a happy and safe 4th of July!

Ari Pineda, Program Assistant, Wildscreen USA
Aug 8

As Shark Week continues to float on here in the US, we think it’s the perfect time to shine the spotlight on some of the strangest-looking sharks found on Earth. We all know what the great white shark looks like but have you seen a shark with an ‘executioner’ style hood over its head or one with a beard? Read on to see how many of these bizarre sharks are new to you!

 10. Trendy trim

Photo of leopard shark swimming along sea bed

With a chic patterning of splotches over its body, the leopard shark roams the ocean in the day and night. Despite the fear that all sharks are dangerous, the leopard shark is actually harmless to man and even approachable when it lounges on the sea floor during the day.

 9.  An immense encounter

Photo of whale shark filter feeding, surrounded by other smaller fish

We think this shark merits an appearance on this list just for its sheer size. The largest fish in the sea, the whale shark can weigh up to 13 tons. Perhaps ironically, the biggest fish in the world feeds primarily on some of the smallest organisms, tiny planktonic organisms.

8.  Hard-headed

Photo of kitefin shark swimming

The blunt snout of this species along with its large eyes makes the kitefin shark a perfect addition to our list. The kitefin shark is uniquely ovoviviparous meaning it gives birth to live young instead of laying eggs like most other fish species.

7. Hooded hider

Photo of hooded carpetshark showing spriacle

With a black mask over its head and snout, the hooded carpet shark is said to resemble an eerie ‘executioner’s hood’. The addition of white spots that cover most of its body helps this species to blend into surrounding coral until this nocturnal shark comes to life at night.

6. Wide-eyed wonder

Photo of crocodile shark speciman close up

Check out the blinders on this fish! The crocodile shark is a small slender shark known for its short head and large eyes likely used to hunt effectively at night. Following its prey towards the water surface at night and away during the day, the crocodile shark is an active hunter which enjoys a wide variety of prey including squid, fish, and shrimp.

5. See a saw

Photo of green sawfish swimming

Aptly named, the green sawfish has an elongated snout with over 23 pairs of teeth.  By using this impeccable nozzle, the green sawfish is able to feed on slow-moving fish by clubbing at them with a side of its saw. Cleverly, the green sawfish uses its saw to act as a shovel-like instrument to rake out crustaceans.

4. Face of an angel

Photo of angel shark on the seabed at night

Sometimes mistaken for a large ray due to its appearance, the angel shark has a remarkably flat body and well-placed eyes on the top of its head that are perfect for ambush-style predation. The angel shark is Critically Endangered, likely due to its prevalence in by-catch – the accidental capture of species through standard fishing practices such as trawling. Sadly, this species has been declared extinct in the North Sea.

3. Mega mouth

Photo of basking shark feeding

As the second largest fish in the sea, the basking shark is one to impress. Perhaps a good kisser, the basking shark uses its three-foot-wide mouth to filter feed while it ‘basks’. Not too interested in the social scene, the solitary basking shark is thought to hibernate in deep water.

2. Ancient allure

Photo of filled shark swimming

The frilled shark is one of the most primitive species of living shark. Having perfected its look to have a lizard-like, blunt-ended snout and a very large mouth, the frilled shark possesses an unconventional beauty. Living primarily in the deep-water darkness, this three-foot-long and mysterious beast has had few observations made in its natural environment.

1. Camouflaged charmer

Photo of tasselled wobbegong

Literally meaning ‘well fringed nose with shaggy beard’, the tasselled wobbegong is an exceedingly unusual looking shark. With its branching skin flaps and a lofty lattice-like ‘beard’ the wobbegong’s bristles provide it with a sagacious camouflage and overall appearance. We challenge you to find a weirder-looking shark on ARKive!

Were any sharks on our list new to you? Or do you have a favorite to add to the list? Surf the ARKive site for more sharks and share your favorites in the comments below!

Jade Womack, Education & Outreach Intern, Wildscreen USA

Jun 5

This Saturday, June 8th, is World Oceans Day, a global event coordinated by the Ocean Project and The World Ocean Network, that celebrates the important relationship between humans and the oceans.

Photo of humpback whale

Humpback whales travel thousands of kilometers across the oceans each year as part of their migration.

The theme of World Oceans Day for 2013 and 2014 is “together we have the power to protect the ocean”. Taking the theme to heart, ARKive has joined up with World Oceans Day as a digital conservation partner by creating a virtual scavenger hunt across the ARKive collection featuring 10 keystone species from all walks of ocean life.

Think you have the nautical know-how it takes to finish the hunt? To start you off, we’ll give you the first clue:

 “The noises I make are whistles and clicks. I can leap out of the ocean and perform other neat tricks.”

6-hammerhead-shark.cropped

You’ll know you’ve found the right species from the clue when you spot  our scavenger hunt mascot – the ARKive hammerhead shark Survival app hero – on the species page. By clicking on it, the next clue will be revealed until you’ve found the final species in the hunt and win!

Each winner of the virtual scavenger hunt will receive an awesome Facebook cover photo so you can spread the ocean word to all your friends. We have also created a Facebook landing page for the scavenger hunt with some tips and tricks to help you along the way. Share the page with friends and family and see who can finish the scavenger hunt first!

If you have completed the ARKive World Oceans Day virtual scavenger hunt and are looking to surf the ARKive collection a bit more, why not have a look at our rocky and sandy shore topic pages or dive into ARKive Education for some water-themed education resources? Or, check out the World Oceans Day website for a listing of hands-on events that may be happening near you.

However you choose to celebrate, the ARKive team wishes you a wonderful World Oceans Day!

Ari Pineda, Program Coordinator, Wildscreen USA

Apr 1

Photographic evidence has ended speculation regarding the validity of reported recent sightings of a squirrel-like rabbit in the Forest of Dean, England.

Photograph of a squabbit in the Forest of Dean

Currently the only known photograph of the potentially new mammal species nicknamed the ‘squabbit’ © E. Walsh

Scientists have confirmed the existence of an unidentified but potentially new mammal species in the Forest of Dean, England. Reported sightings of a strange-looking grey squirrel over the past three months have raised nothing more than eyebrows. However, recent photographic evidence and further sightings have put an end to speculation, confirming the existence of a small rodent-like mammal that indeed somewhat resembles both the grey squirrel and the European rabbit.

Affectionately dubbed the ‘squabbit’, this new zoological discovery is stumping scientists as to which species it is more closely related; the grey squirrel is a rodent, whereas the European rabbit is a lagomorph. Its bizarre appearance has led the scientists to believe that it may well be a type of arboreal rabbit. The discovery of a new mammal species in the UK is extremely rare, and the case is being treated with extreme caution. However, should the squabbit be formally described as a new species, this would be one of the most significant scientific discoveries for Britain this century.

Squabbit scat sample

Scat sample of the potential new species collected for DNA analysis © E. Cureuil

Slightly larger than the grey squirrel, the squabbit has predominantly grey fur which is a lighter reddish-brown between the ears and at the back of the neck. It has the long, bushy tail characteristic of the grey squirrel, thought to aide its balance when climbing trees, but larger, rounded paws more similar to those of a rabbit. Indeed, the paws of this species are presenting somewhat of a mystery, as the shape would lead scientists to assume that it is a ground-dwelling rather than tree-dwelling species. Surprisingly, however, the majority of reports of the squabbit have described its nimble climbing behaviour and ease of movement among the treetops. The most unusual feature setting this species apart from grey squirrels is its long, rabbit-like ears that are held upright above its head.

Edouard Cureuil, Professor of Rodent Evolution and Ecology at the Université Thierry Lodé, Paris, commented, “Although there is a possibility of genetic mutation within the grey squirrel population, the morphological differences appear too great to attribute to mutation…initial thoughts are that it represents an entirely new species that has somehow, until now, evaded the human eye.”

Grey squirrel with hazelnut in mouth

The squabbit is believed to have a similar diet to the grey squirrel, feeding on acorns, nuts and seeds, among other things.

The fact that the squabbit has so far avoided detection leads scientists to speculate that the species is predominantly nocturnal, and that Britain’s currently unpredictable climate may have disrupted its behaviour. It is thought to have a diet similar to that of the grey squirrel, feeding primarily on acorns, nuts and seeds, although it has also been observed grazing on grass at the foot of trees. Further studies should confirm whether this species builds burrows underground or nests in trees.

Several theories on the arboreal tendencies of the squabbit have been discussed, the most popular being an adaptation response to predation risks from wild boar and the many birds of prey present in the Forest of Dean. Camera traps have been deployed throughout the small area in which the squabbit occurs, and it is hoped that they will enable scientists to gain further insight into the behaviour of this bizarre new species. Scat samples have also been collected for DNA analysis which should shed some light on the unclear ancestry of the squabbit.

If confirmed as a new species, the squabbit will be a major new addition to Britain’s otherwise well-known fauna, and an exciting step for the world of species discovery.

Explore more newly discovered species on ARKive’s newly discovered species topic page.

Kaz Armour, ARKive Text Author

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