Sep 22

At Arkive, we are ever grateful for the support we receive from individuals whether they be photographers and filmmakers who donate their work to make Arkive possible, conservationists & researchers who passionately pursue the science and stories behind the world’s most threatened species, or teachers who bring the WILD into their classroom everyday with Arkive.

But there may be a special group that we cherish support from the most … children! Or, who we like to think of as the “conservationists of tomorrow”. Each time the Arkive team has the chance to connect with children, whether in the classroom, at an event, or on the web through our games and mobile apps, we feel renewed and inspired in our mission to share the wonders of the natural world through the most powerful and compelling images and films that exist.

But sometimes, just when you think you have reached the point of complete inspiration from those youngest members of our society, they completely blow your socks off.

The Afternoon Explorers!

The preschoolers (students age 3-5) of Akiba-Schechter Jewish Day School of Chicago, IL, USA, did just that when they decided to dedicate their annual school fundraiser proceeds to Arkive this year and raised

 $317.69

That’s right. Approximately sixteen students, 5 years old and younger. raised over $300 for Arkive in support of our mission and to help keep Arkive a free and growing resource for all. The only thing better than raising this enormously generous sum for Arkive is the way they did it.

Akiba Schechter is full to the brim with students who are eager to dive into the natural world, learning about both species that live in their community and across the globe. Through a program called the Afternoon Explorers, the students decide which species and habitats they want to digitally explore and spend weeks diving into the photos, films, stories, and scientific information learning everything they can.

Then, at the end of the school year, students channel all the knowledge they have gained through their worldly explorations and interpret it through artwork which they sell at their year-end culminating event called the Afternoon Explorers Boutique. The Boutique is a chance for the students to share their wild journeys with family, friends and the local community and to sell their artwork with proceeds benefiting the students’ charity of choice. Lucky for us, Arkive was their chosen charity for 2014.

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Why was Arkive chosen this year? According to one of the teachers leading the Afternoon Explorers, Emily Bradley Schoenberg,

“Arkive has given the children an amazing window to the world around them and has inspired them to think about the Earth and all of its creatures and how some are endangered. It gives them a sense of responsibility to care for those animals and the environment to make sure they are safe.”

Here’s a taste of some of the incredible items made by the explorers for the Boutique.

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Afternoon Explorer Boutique items – all hand made by the Explorers themselves

And even better, every single item was sold! The team here at Arkive cannot thank the Afternoon Explorers enough for using Arkive as their window to the natural world and for so generously naming Arkive as the recipient of this year’s Afternoon Explorer’s Boutique.  Keep on exploring!

Liana Vitali, Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

Mar 31

One of the best parts about sharing ARKive with educators from around the world is learning how educators are using the collection in unique and creative ways to engage students in science learning. So when we learned how one teacher was inspired by ARKive to create a series of comics about Adaptation that encourage STEM-based inquiry learning, we were all …

Zebra ear photo

you guessed it – EARS!

Laura Balliet is a science & math teacher at a school for at-risk youth in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. She often struggled with engaging her students in reading about science concepts and as a result, her students were often missing important information in their science curriculum.  She decided to make short, colorful, one-page comics that addressed specific topics that she knew were going to appear on the Ohio State Achievement Assessment and then handed the comics out to her students.

Adaptations comic - Cool School Rap

As it turned out, her students couldn’t get enough of her comics and requested new comics to read daily! In her search for new ideas and inspiration for her educational comics, Laura turned to ARKive and even started included research on ARKive as part of the learning process in her comics. Over time, she has organized her comics into a collection called the Cool School Rap.

We caught up with Laura to ask her a few questions about her comics and how ARKive has helped inspire her. Here’s what she said!

What first inspired you to draw comics?

I have always doodled cartoon characters, but it wasn’t until last year, a few weeks before the achievement tests, that I figured out how to channel it.  The initial intent of the comics was to help my students prepare for the test by reviewing key science topics, but their responses were so positive, I felt inspired to continue drawing and developing the idea.

How do your comics help to teach science to a variety of student ages and learning abilities?

As a teacher of at-risk youth, I face a wide variety of learning abilities, especially low reading skills and short attention spans.  My comics deliver content with illustrations, word bubbles and diagrams making them less intimidating to struggling readers and engaging to those who are turned off by lengthy passages.

Photosynthesis comic - Cool School Rap Consumers comic - Cool School Rap

What has been your most rewarding experience using comics in the classroom?

I think the most rewarding aspect of my comics is my students’ reactions when I present them with a new comic.  They are always excited and eager to read, and when I overhear them conversing about the illustrations and the concepts, I get butterflies because it is apparent they are engaged and learning.

How has ARKive played a role in your comics?

I have been using ARKive as a resource for information for some time now, but recently, I began incorporating this site directly into The Cool School Rap’s inquiry activities.  The adaptation inquiry is a great example.  My students utilized this site to research a specific animal of interest and gather information to build a model of their animal’s habitat.  My students find the site easy to navigate and enjoy browsing through the pictures and videos.

Student using ARKive for learning

NSTA logoLaura shared that her ultimate goal with Cool School Rap is to reach as many learners as possible and we are more than happy to help share Laura’s talent and passion with the world! She has created an Adaptation comic series specifically for ARKive that you can download from the Cool School Rap website. Laura will also be volunteering at the ARKive booth at the upcoming National Science Teachers Association Conference in Boston, MA on April 3-5. Hope to see you there!

Liana Vitali, Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

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