Apr 25

Well done to everyone who took part in our #GuessThePenguin quiz for World Penguin Day. You all have great identification skills when it comes to these very handsome creatures!

We can now reveal the answers to the mystery penguins we posted on social media, but we didn’t want to ruin it for those who didn’t see it and still wanted to play the quiz, so we’ve revealed the answers at the bottom of this blog. Can you guess the penguin species just from looking at a photo?

1) CLUE: I live in a very surprising place where you may not know that penguins exist

2) CLUE: this penguin is named after the wife of the explorer who discovered it

3) CLUE: this penguin is named after a distinctive characteristic below its bill

4) CLUE: this is the largest penguin species in the world, reaching heights of over 1m and weighing up to 40kgs

5) CLUE: this amazing penguin can dive to depths of over 170 metres and is the fastest known diving bird, reaching speeds of up to 36 kilometers an hour in the water

6) CLUE: this is the smallest penguin in the world, weighing a maximum of 1kg and only growing up to 40cm tall

7) CLUE: this penguin was discovered during an expedition that took place in 1519

8) CLUE: this penguin is not named after a type of pasta, although it is commonly mistaken for the penguin that sounds like it is!

9) CLUE: look into the eyes of this penguin and you might just guess its name!

…and the answers are:

1) African

2) Adelie

3) Chinstrap

4) Emperor

5) Gentoo

6) Little

7) Magellanic

8) Royal

9) Yellow-eyed

How many did you guess correctly?

Discover more penguin species on Arkive

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Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Baer’s poachard

Nominated by: Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust (WWT)

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? WWT loves the Baer’s Pochard because it is a very understated and poorly-known diving duck that is in urgent need of help. Sporting a plumage of mostly shades of brown, it has declined massively within its East Asian range over the past 20 years or so and there is likely to be fewer than 500 birds remaining. It might also be the canary in the coalmine for other East Asian ducks – most of these remain relatively numerous but a lack of good counting schemes means it is hard to know whether they are declining or not. More love for Baer’s Pochard also means more love for the many other migratory ducks that share its flyway.

What are the threats to Baer’s pochard? The major threat is likely to be the extensive loss of its wetland habitat in both breeding and wintering areas, but particularly parts of the breeding range in northeast China. This region has seen a huge loss of wetland habitat in recent decades, primarily for rice production. Many of the few remaining wintering sites are also under threat, particularly from the development of housing and industry, as well as recreation. In addition, there are significant levels of waterbird hunting and egg harvesting ongoing in much of its range, and whilst we do not yet know the true scale of this it is likely that intense effort at particular wetlands that still support the species could have a significant impact on the remnant population that is now concentrated at a small number of suitable sites.

What are you doing to save it? WWT has led the process to develop an action plan for the species under the auspices of the East Asian – Australasian Flyway Partnership and is now overseeing its implementation through the EAAFP Baer’s Pochard Task Force, though this is only just getting started and there is much to do. We need to identify all the sites that still support Baer’s Pochard and ensure they are properly protected and managed.

Surveys have been undertaken in parts of its range, and this winter key sites in Myanmar will be surveyed in the near future. The most significant gap in our knowledge is about where they are breeding – the latest counts have located about three times as many birds in winter as compared to the breeding season. We also urgently need to know more about the impact of hunting and egg harvesting and ensure any ongoing activity is halted.

Find out more about WWT’s conservation work

Discover the top 50 bird species on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: White-backed vulture

Nominated by: Colchester Zoo – Action for the Wild

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? Vultures are so important to our ecosystem as they represent natures ‘dustman’, removing carcases that may spread disease to humans and other wildlife. They are not just scavengers, they are actually relatively successful hunters. Seeing them fly together circling in the skies is a breath taking sight as they fly with grace with such a large wing span. Overall they are very smart birds with great individual characters, we need vultures!

What are the threats to the white-backed vulture? The most threatened group of birds in the world, there has been a massive population decline in recent years especially in West Africa. Threats to the species consist of poisoning and hunting, along with habitat loss which results in lack of food availability.

What are you doing to save it? Colchester Zoo supports a number of vulture conservation projects through their charity Action for the Wild these include Gyps Vulture Restoration Project and VulPro. One of Colchester Zoo’s keepers has been out to Africa and volunteered at VulPro and went on to help at the Vulture Conservation Project Seminar, you can find out more about the projects and keeper, Kat’s, experience on our website.

Find out more about Colchester Zoo’s Action for Wildlife project

Discover more hawk, eagle, kite and harrier species on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

Jan 25

January 25th marks the Birthday of Robert Burns (1759-1796), an iconic Scottish figure and one of the world’s most famous poets. Admired for his poems, love songs and cheeky character, Robert Burns created works which are still well known today, such as Auld Lang Syne, one of the most popular songs in the English language. Since Burns’ early death over 200 years ago, people have gathered together every year to commemorate his life and work. Burns Night is one of the most celebrated events in Scottish culture, and the occasion is recognised all over the world. Typically, a supper is held on or around January 25th, which includes a traditional Scottish meal, Scotch whisky, music, speeches and recitation of Robert Burns’ work. In memory of Robert Burns, we thought we’d delve into the ARKive collection and celebrate all things Scottish!

Spear thistle

Spear thistle image

Spear thistle in flower

Legend has it the Scottish army were alerted to the onset of Viking intruders after one of them stood on a thistle barefooted and cried out in pain. The thistle has been the national emblem of Scotland for centuries, and the earliest record of it being used as a royal symbol is on coins issued by James III in 1470. Although the actual species of thistle is disputed, some believe that the spear thistle is most likely to be the true ‘Scotch thistle’, as it is abundant and native to Scotland.

Red deer

Red deer image

Red deer stag roaring during rut

Britain’s largest land mammal, the red deer is widespread throughout Scotland, with an estimated population of 300,000. In winter, the red deer tend to move from the hills and remote glens to lower areas with shelter and a more abundant food supply. In winter the coat is brown or grey, but it changes to a reddish-brown in the summer.

Puffin

Puffin image

Puffin

In April, puffins begin arriving around the Scottish coast to breed. Almost one million puffins choose to breed in Scotland, and most are concentrated in just a few colonies in the north and west. Puffins nest in burrows or in rocky crevices, and normally lay a single egg in May. The best time to see puffins in Scotland is in mid-July, when the adults are busy collecting sand eels to feed the pufflings.

Scottish wildcat

Scottish wildcat image

Scottish wildcat resting in woodland

It is thought that fewer than 400 ‘genetically pure’ wildcats remain in Scotland today. This is because wildcats breed with domestic cats, creating hybrids which are diluting the population. The wildcat is solitary and usually hunts at night. It catches rabbits, hares, voles and mice, but it may also feed on small birds, frogs and even insects.

Osprey

Osprey image

Osprey carrying a fish

Ospreys arrive in Scotland to breed in late April to early May after an amazing journey from western Africa, which takes about 20 flying days. There are around 200 breeding osprey pairs in Scotland, and the best places to see them include Loch Garten and Loch of the Lowes. Ospreys return to their wintering grounds in West Africa in late August to mid-September. If you can’t make it to Scotland this summer, why not watch this fantastic osprey video – it’s the most popular one on ARKive!

Scots pine

Scots pine image

Scots pine forest

The Scots pine is native to Scotland and is a dominant tree in the Caledonian Forest, which is also made up of birch, aspen, rowan, oak and juniper. Although pinewood forests were once spread over most of the Highlands, only 1% of the original forest remains, split into smaller, fragmented pockets. The oldest scientifically dated Scots pine in Scotland is Glen Loyne, which was estimated to be 550 years old in the late 1990s.

Bottlenose dolphin

Bottlenose dolphin image

Bottlenose dolphins breaching

Bottlenose dolphins inhabit the waters around the Scottish coast throughout the year, but they are easiest to spot during the spring and summer. The Moray Firth is home to the most northerly resident bottlenose dolphin population in the world, and is one of the best places to watch dolphins in Scotland. Compared to bottlenose dolphins in warmer climates, such as Florida, the Moray Firth dolphins are larger and fatter to insulate them from the colder water.

Eurasian beaver

Eurasian beaver image

Eurasian beaver feeding

Between May 2009 and September 2010, 16 Eurasian beavers were released into the wild in Knapdale Forest, Mid-Argyll, as part of a monitored trial. The first beaver kit (named Barney) was born in spring 2010, making him the first to be born in the wild in Scotland for over 400 years! At the end of the trial, decisions will be made about the future of beavers in Knapdale Forest and other possible reintroduction sites in Scotland. You can see some videos of the introduced beavers on the Scottish Beaver Trial blog.

Let us know if your favourite Scottish species is missing from our blog! How are you planning to celebrate Burns Night?

Nov 26

In the United States, folks are gearing up for a major meal tomorrow centered around one, iconic bird … the turkey! The theme of Thanksgiving is just that, to give thanks. So we’d like to shed some light on turkey species around the globe and give a little thanks for the great diversity of species we have on Earth. Some species you know and some we bet you’ve never seen before.

Any of these turkey’s ring a bell?

Ocellated turkey

Ocellated turkey photo

Check out this beauty! The ocellated turkey is a conspicuous, vibrant-colored bird that can be easily distinguished from one of its closest turkey cousins, the larger and less colorful North American wild turkey.

Turkey-chick

Turkey-chick photo

Maybe not a turkey that you are familiar with, but a “turkey” nonetheless! The peculiarly named turkey-chick is a geophyte; a plant that can survive periods of unfavorable conditions due to an underground food-storage organ. One of these would be mighty helpful during the average Thanksgiving Day meal, wouldn’t you agree?

Turkey vulture

Turkey vulture photo

So a turkey vulture isn’t exactly the same as the typical bird that comes to mind on Thanksgiving, but at least this turkey has feathers! Did you know that flocks of tens of thousands turkey vulture migrate together from North America to South America each year? Imagine a roost of that size for Thanksgiving dinner!

Wild turkey

Wild turkey photo

A much more familiar turkey, the wild turkey, which is the wild relative of one of only two domesticated birds to have originated in North America, the wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is one of the largest and most distinctive members of the Galliformes (a group of game birds which includes grouse, pheasants and partridges.

We hope you enjoyed our mini-turkey tour and from all of us at Arkive, we wish you a Happy Thanksgiving!

Ari Pineda, Program Coordinator, Wildscreen USA

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