Apr 24

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Apr 17, 2015

Your name here: auctioning the naming rights to new species to fund conservation

Titan-beetle-climbing-branch

Titan beetle climbing branch

Ecologist, Mary Lowman was on a mission to save Ethiopia’s church forests so she needed an innovative way to fundraise. Thus began the process of auctioning off new species’ naming rights which includes several different new species of beetle.

View original article

Article originally published on Saturday, Apr 18, 2015

Approving a hunt is a misguided solution to bear problem

American-black-bear-cinnamon-morph-female-with-cinnamon-and-black-cubs

American black bear and cinnamon morph black bears

On Wednesday (Apr 15), the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved a plan to legalize bear hunts in Florida, specifically targeting the black bear. The rationale is that their population has rebounded and that there has been an increase in human-bear encounters.

View original article

Article originally published on Sunday, Apr 19, 2015

Sea lion pup taken from Dockweiler Beach parking lot, witness says

Young-California-sea-lion

Young California sea lion

A witness  saw four people harassing two sea lion pups; the pups were not injured. The suspects then took one of the pups and put it in their car and drove away. The whereabouts of the pup are unknown at this time.

View original article

Article originally published on Monday, Apr 20, 2015

Kemp’s ridley sea turtles are mysteriously vanishing

Kemps-ridley-turtle-hatchlings

Kemp’s ridley turtle hatchlings

In 2010, nest numbers for Kemp’s ridley turtle fell by 35 percent at primary nesting beaches with slight increases in 2011 and 2012. 1n 2014, however the nest total was the lowest in eight years. While the BP oil spill may be a factor, other researchers suggest that colder water temperatures might have affected their populations

View original article

Article originally published on Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015

Judge recognizes two chimpanzees as legal persons: a first

Eastern-chimpanzee-subordinate-pant-in-response-to-dominant-grunt

Eastern chimpanzee

Hercules and Leo, the chimpanzees have been determined to be people in New York courts. Both chimpanzees were being used for biomedical experiments. Now, they will spend the rest of their lives at an animal sanctuary.

View original article

Article originally published on Wednesday Apr 22, 2015

Elephant contraception? How a vaccine is replacing sharpshooters

African-elephant-family

African elephant family

Elephants used to be killed by the hundreds in South Africa to keep their numbers below a certain threshold. At Greater Makalali, however, the vaccine PZP has cut the rate of increase of the population by half, its success has led to its adoption in other South African wildlife reserves.

View original article

Article originally published on Thursday, Apr 23, 2015

Could Bees Be Addicted to Pesticides?

Honey-bee-asleep-during-cold-weather

Honey bee asleep during cold weather

It appears that bees prefer to eat pesticide –contaminated plants. Neonicotinoids may act like drugs to make “foods” containing these substances more rewarding. Previous research has shown that neonicotinoids scramble the memory and navigation function in bees.

View original article

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

Apr 17

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Apr 10, 2015

Elephant mother and calf reunite after 3 years apart

Indian-elephant-cow-and-calf

Indian elephant cow and calf

MeBai, a female Asian elephant, was just three years old when she was separated from her mother to enter the tourism industry. Three years later, however, MeBai has been reunited with her mother Mae Yui, with plans to rehabilitate and release them into the wild.

View original article

Article originally published on Saturday, Apr 11, 2015

Cat-eating Nile lizards targeted in Florida

Nile-monitor-head-detail

Nile monitor

Florida state wildlife officials have said that Nile monitors can be dangerous to pets and people. Officials are asking residents to report any sightings. Nile monitors join the Burmese python and lionfish as invasive species residing in Florida.

View original article

burmese-python

Burmese python

Article originally published on Sunday, Apr 12, 2015

The last male northern white rhino must now be kept under armed guard 24/7

Male-northern-white-rhinoceros

Male northern white rhinoceros

Sudan, the last remaining male northern white rhino, is being cared for at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya along with two females. Including two other females in captivity, there now remains only 5 individuals of this white rhinoceros subspecies.

View original article

Article originally published on Monday, Apr 13, 2015

Hope for world’s zaniest fish

Smalltooth-sawfish-in-shallow-water

Smalltooth sawfish in shallow water

Researchers discovered that smalltooth sawfish spend most of their time in a subtropical Florida bay near the coast. The next step involves understanding the behavior the sawfish exhibit in this environment.

View original article

Article originally published on Tuesday, Apr 14, 2015

Rare Omura’s whale washes up in Australia

Fin-whale

Fin whale

This is only the second sighting of an Omura’s whale in Australia, and one of the few sightings globally. There is no population estimate for this species and little is known about its ecology or reproductive biology. This species is often incorrectly identified as a fin whale.

View original article

Article originally published on Wednesday, Apr 15, 2015

Iowa State anthropologist finds female chimps more likely to use tools when hunting

Female-chimpanzee-with-infants

Female chimpanzee with infants

At a research site in Fongoli, Senegal it appears that female chimpanzees are more likely to use tools to hunt, but only at this site. The underlying reason seems to be that dominant males allow females and low-ranking males to keep their prey as opposed to taking it from them as is observed in other sites.

View original article

Article originally published on Thursday, Apr 16, 2015

100 volunteers fail to rescue a beached whale shark after hours of struggling

Whale-shark-filter-feeding-surrounded-by-other-smaller-fish

Whale shark filter feeding

On Monday, a whale shark washed up on a beach in Ecuador. Volunteers attempted to return the whale to the water, but were unsuccessful. Whale sharks are currently listed as vulnerable and are known for being quite docile.

View original article

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

 

Jan 30

Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week. Enjoy!

 

The following articles were originally published on Monday, January 26, 2015

Palm oil may be single most immediate threat to the greatest number of species

Bornean orangutan photo

Bornean orangutan infant hanging from tree

Palm oil production drives the conversion of ecosystems such as rainforest and peatlands into plantations which reduces biological diversity. Many species in South East Asia are affected by palm oil production such as the charismatic orangutan.

View original article

 

Giant pandas don’t know their own faces

Infant giant panda, portrait

Apparently, giant pandas do not recognize themselves in a mirror. When confronted with their own image they reacted by showing defensive behavior.

View original article

 

The following articles were originally published on Tuesday, January 27, 2015.

How Ebola is killing the world’s ape population and what we can do to stop it

Juvenile eastern chimpanzee in tree

Western lowland gorilla silverback

 

The Ebola virus affects not only humans, but chimpanzees and gorillas as well. There appears to be a legitimate link between the increase of deforestation and the frequency of outbreaks.

View original article

 

 

 

 

 

President Obama Protects Untouched Marine Wilderness in Alaska

Portrait of bearded seal, head coloured by sediment

Bowhead whale surfacing

Atlantic walrus portrait

President Obama has declared 9.8 million acres in the wateroff of Alaska’s coast as off-limits to consideration for future oil and gas leasing. These waters are home to  bowhead whales walruses, and bearded seals.

View original article

 

The following articles were originally published on Wednesday, January 28.

Rare Sierra Nevada Red Fox Sighted In Yosemite National Park

Red fox in snow, side profile

Yosemite National park officials spotted a Sierra Nevada red fox in the park for the first time in almost 100 years. This subspecies of the red fox is extremely rare with less than 50 individuals believed to be in existence.

View original article

 

With local help, hawksbill sea turtles make a comeback in Nicaragua

Front on view of a hawksbill turtle

Hawksbill turtles have shown a 200 percent increase from 154 nests to 468 nests in the last 14 years. Poaching rates in Nicaragua’s Pearl Cays have decreased by more than 80 percent.

View original article

 

The following articles were originally published on  Thursday, January 29 .

Scientists discover that fish larvae make sounds

Five-lined snapper shoal

Researchers found that the larvae of grey snapper produce sound though at this time it is unclear as to the purpose of these sounds. Snapper are a large diverse group that includes the vibrantly colored five-lined snapper.

View original article

Mysterious megamouth shark washes ashore in the Philippines

Megamouth shark

A 15 foot adult male megamouth shark washed up on the shores of Barangay Marigondon in the Philippines on Wednesday. There are only 64 confirmed sightings of this mysterious and elusive shark.

View original article

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

Apr 2
Dr. Jane Goodall photo


Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE, Founder, the Jane Goodall Institute &, UN Messenger of Peace © Stuart Clarke

Few people have inspired the world to treasure and protect nature and all living things like Dr. Jane Goodall. Sometimes affectionately referred to as “the chimp lady”, Jane has dedicated her life to inspiring people to take action in support of conservation with an emphasis, of course, on chimpanzees.

Dr. Jane has always been a tireless supporter of Wildscreen and ARKive. As recently as the last Wildscreen Festival – the world’s largest and most influential wildlife filmmaking festival – Jane spoke to a packed house about her conservation journey that started back in 1960 when she first began studying chimpanzees.

Fifty-four years later, Jane is still spreading her message of hope for animals around the world, and now there is an opportunity for the world to share a message of appreciation for Jane right back!

Jane turns 80 on April 3, 2014, and her wish is to share her birthday celebration with the world via a Google Hangout that day at 11 a.m. PDT / 2 p.m. EDT / 6 p.m. UTC. Joining Dr. Jane will be a number of young people sharing projects they are dedicating to her for her birthday. If you can’t make the virtual party, no worries! You can sign Dr. Jane’s birthday card with your sentiments and well wishes.

Dr. Jane and Freud photo

Dr. Jane Goodall with Gombe chimpanzee Freud © Michael Neugebauer

To celebrate in our own ARKive way, we’ve organized a MyARKive Scrapbook of our favourite chimpanzee images and videos on ARKive including this sweet face and this family of playful youngsters. We hope you enjoy it!

From all of us at Wildscreen & ARKive, Happy Birthday Dr. Jane!

Liana Vitali, Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

Apr 30

Disneynature’s latest film Chimpanzee,  which was exclusively previewed on the opening night of Wildscreen Festival 2012, is coming to cinemas across the UK on May 3rd.  Chimpanzee follows the remarkable story of Oscar, a baby chimp whose life takes a surprising turn after he is left all alone following a confrontation with a rival band of chimps. Here at the ARKive office to celebrate the release of this film we thought we would take a closer look at chimpanzees, our closest living relative.

A young chimpanzee

Along with the pygmy chimp and bonobo, the chimpanzee is the closest living relative to humans, and is estimated to share 98 percent of our genes. Chimpanzees are very social animals living in stable communities which range in size from 15 to 150 members. Male chimpanzees stay in the same community for their entire lives where a strict linear hierarchy is employed. 

Group of sleeping chimpanzees

Chimpanzees feed mainly on fruit, but when this is scarce they supplement their diet with leaves, seeds and insects. Another favourite food of chimpanzees is meat, with groups cooperating together to hunt and kill monkeys. Chimpanzees are highly intelligent animals and are one of few species known to use tools. They use sticks to remove ants or termites from their nests and stones to crack open nuts. Chimpanzees are also known to use leaves as sponges to absorb drinking water.

Chimpanzee using a rock to crack a palm nut

Female chimpanzees normally give birth to one infant which develops slowly. Young chimpanzees ride on their mothers back, gripping on to her fur, until the age of two and are not weaned until around four years old, although they retain strong ties with their mother after this. 

Female chimpanzee with her baby

Chimpanzees will often spend hours grooming each other, removing dirt, insects and seeds from each others fur. This not only keeps individuals dirt free and healthy, but it also helps to strengthen and maintain bonds between group members.

Chimpanzees grooming each other

To find out more visit ARKive’s chimpanzee species profile. 

Jemma Pealing
Media Researcher

About

RSS feedArkive.org is the place for films, photos and facts about endangered species. Subscribe to our blog today to keep up to date!

Email updates

Sign up to receive a regular email digest of Arkive blog posts.
Preferred frequency:

Arkive twitter

Twitter: ARKive