Feb 15
Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Collared laughingthrush' on Delicious Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Collared laughingthrush' on Digg Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Collared laughingthrush' on Facebook Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Collared laughingthrush' on reddit Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Collared laughingthrush' on StumbleUpon Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Collared laughingthrush' on Email Share 'Endangered Species of the Week: Collared laughingthrush' on Print Friendly

Endangered Species of the Week: Collared laughingthrush

Collared laughingthrush (Garrulax yersini)

Collared laughingthrush (Garrulax yersini)

Species: Collared laughingthrush (Garrulax yersini)

Status: Endangered (EN)

Interesting Fact: The collared laughingthrush spends much of its time skulking among dense vegetation, only betraying its presence with its loud song.

More information:

Found only in the Da Lat plateau in Vietnam, the collared laughingthrush is a colourful, ground-dwelling bird. A striking species with soft, fluffy plumage, the collared laughingthrush has a black hood that contrasts sharply with silver ear patches and a predominantly orange-brown body. Like other laughingthrushes, it is a robust, thrush-like bird of the forest floor and understory, with very strong legs and short, rounded wings.

Very little is known about the specific biology and behaviour of the rare and secretive collared laughingthrush. However, it is a social species, occurring in flocks of four to eight individuals. The collared laughingthrush is generally found in the forest understory where it occupies the dense vegetation of the undergrowth.

The collared laughingthrush has a very small and highly fragmented range, meaning it is extremely vulnerable to further habitat loss. Logging, agriculture, fuel-wood collection and charcoal production are all putting pressure on the collared laughingthrush’s habitat, while a government resettlement programme has greatly increased the number of people on the Da Lat plateau exploiting forest resources. On Mount Lang Bian, all land below 1,500 metres is now logged or under cultivation.

This species is afforded some protection as a result of its presence in the Chu Yang Sin Nature Reserve, although presently few protection measures exist for the reserve. There is the potential for eco-tourism to be developed at various sites, as well as the sustainable production of charcoal, which would lessen the impacts of this manufacturing process on natural habitats.

 

Find out more about the collared laughingthrush at BirdLife International.

See images of the collared laughingthrush on ARKive.

Phoebe Shaw Stewart, ARKive Text Author

About

RSS feedARKive.org is the place for films, photos and facts about endangered species. Subscribe to our blog today to keep up to date!

Email updates

Sign up to receive a regular email digest of ARKive blog posts.
Preferred frequency:

ARKive twitter

Twitter: ARKive