Jun 8

This year the Society of Biology’s amateur photography competition is inviting budding photographers to think creatively about forests, grasslands, deserts and watery environments, fitting in with the theme ‘Home, Habitat & Shelter’.

Entries can focus on any of the world’s amazing ecosystems, although as today is World Ocean’s Day we thought we would give potential entrants some inspiration from one of nature’s most mysterious and varied environments. Occupying approximately two thirds of the Earth’s surface and containing around 95 percent of the Earth’s water, the world’s oceans provide numerous habitats for a wide range of species. The oceans are divided into five distinct areas: the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern (Antarctic) and Arctic.

Oceans are divided into five layers, and each layer is designated depending on its depth, physical characteristics and biological conditions, and the richness of life within each zone can vary considerably. Oceanographers categorise the open ocean as the pelagic zone, while the far depths, including the oceanic trenches, are described as hedalpelagic. At depths between 6,000 and 11,000 metres, there is a very low density of marine-life due to the harsh physical and chemical conditions.

But even at great depths and with no direct access to sunlight, creatures have evolved to survive and thrive. The giant tube worm lives around strong flowing hydrothermal vents, which are cracks on the ocean floor from which very hot, mineral-rich water flows into the surrounding ocean water. These vents are usually found near volcanically active places and the surrounding water is heated by the magma beneath the Earth’s surface.

Giant tube worm plume – a deep-sea species

The giant tube worm lives inside thin, tube-like structures made from chitin (a hard, protective material found in the outer skeleton of some invertebrates) and can grow up to two metres long. It has an impressive, haemoglobin-rich, red plume which is extended when it is undisturbed. The highly specialised body is divided into four sections, each of which plays a role in gas exchange, structure and support, and absorption of nutrients. Like other worms, it does not have a digestive tract and relies on a symbiotic relationship with bacteria in its body tissue. The bacteria perform chemosynthesis, a process by which organic molecules are produced for the worm to feed on.

Giant tube worm specimen

The remoteness of the hydrothermal vents prevents scientists from studying the ecology and biology of this species and others that live in these deep-sea areas. So although it is clear to see they have adapted to thrive in harsh oceanic environments, other biological features such as reproduction and feeding habits are relatively unknown.

If you have been inspired to think about a creature that has developed to flourish in a unique environment or you have simply been struck by the beauty of a creature in its natural habitat, why not enter the Society of Biology amateur photography competition. Photographs could focus on biological research which helps to answer the complex question of why and how different organisms survive in diverse environments; or, could simply capture the beauty of an animal in its natural habitat.

Further details on entering the photography competition are available on the Society of Biology website

Jun 25

ARKive is working with the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) to help highlight the plight of the world’s invertebrates. Through our joint Invertebrate Photography Competition, we hope to increase the availablility of invertebrate imagery for conservation purposes.

We’re looking for images of the world’s invertebrates – from snails to spiders, beetles to butterflies or corals to crabs. Show us your best photos to help promote invertebrate conservation and to be in with a chance of winning some brilliant prizes!

Win

The winning entry will receive a two-day ticket to WildPhotos 2012!

Presented by Mark Carwardine and Chris Packham, the annual two-day event is packed full of inspirational talks from the world’s top wildlife and conservation photographers where you can learn from industry experts, hear the stories behind the spectacular images, find out about the latest technologies and join the debate on the hottest topical issues.

Other prizes to be won

  • The best images will be displayed at a special exhibition at ZSL London Zoo in August 2012. Photographers whose images are selected will receive a pair of tickets to London Zoo to attend the photographic exhibition.
  • The winner and runners up will also receive a copy of ZSL’s report on the status and trends of invertebrates.

If you’re in need of some inspiration, explore the amazing variety of invertebrates on ARKive as well as some of the fabulous entries we’ve received so far. ..

© Adrian Gonzales-Guillen, Polymita picta form iolimbata

© Adrian Gonzales-Guillen

© Madjid Momeni Moghaddam

© Madjid Momeni Moghaddam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
© P. Jeganathan, weaver Ant

© P. Jeganathan

 
© James Reardon

© James Reardon

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
© Heather Hillard, red pencil urchin

© Heather Hillard

© Elyssa Kellerman, Giraffe-necked weevil

© Elyssa Kellerman

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Please submit your entries directly to ARKive at the following email address: invertphotocomp@wildscreen.org.uk
 
The deadline to enter the competition is 20th July 2012. Entries received after this date may still be used by ARKive, ZSL and IUCN (please see further information below).
 

We look forward to receiving your images of the world’s invertebrates. Good luck!

 

Terms and conditions for use of imagery by ARKive, IUCN and ZSL

  • All submitted images will be held in the repositories at ARKive, where they are being preserved and maintained for the benefit of future generations, and made available for non-commercial awareness-raising and educational purposes via the ARKive website. ARKive does not sell photographs, but rather the ARKive website acts as a showcase for image providers, displaying copyright and contact details with every image, as well as links to each media donor’s own web activities. See ARKive’s full terms and conditions.
  • The electronic copies of the images provided to ARKive may be made available to IUCN for electronic publishing on the IUCN Red List and the Amazing Species websites.
  • IUCN and ZSL may use images in electronic press-releases and resulting news stories promoting, for example, the IUCN Red List and the ZSL report on invertebrate status and trends.
  • ZSL may use the images in its report on invertebrate status and trends to be launched at Jeju, and related exhibitions, as specified in the letter above IUCN may also use the images in, for example, reports on the IUCN Red List. Copyright holders will be contacted prior to these activities.
  • Copyright holders will be acknowledged in any use of their images.
  • The images on the IUCN Red List websites and in associated IUCN and ZSL electronic products, as listed above, will be low-resolution (no larger than roughly 480×320) and will be clearly marked with a copyright notice. In addition, the Red List website ‘Terms of Use’ will include a restriction that those wishing to republish or otherwise use the images found on the Red List website or in Red List products should contact the copyright holders directly for approval for such use. ZSL terms and conditions for website use can be viewed at http://www.zsl.org/info/legal/content/general-terms,208,AR.html

 

Apr 25

Creative climate Change Challenge imageARKive’s Creative Climate Change Challenge was launched during Climate Week back in March. We asked you to get creative and through an exciting and engaging way, raise awareness about a species affected by climate change.

The creativity was outstanding – we received everything from papier mache penguins to clownfish cookies. The ARKive judges were taken on an emotional roller coaster – from the tear jerking tale of the table mountain ghost frog to the awe-inspiring sounds of a karaoke koala!

The judges were looking for entries which evoked an emotional response that would inspire people to do something to help combat climate change. The results are in and there were 3 entries that, in the judges’ minds, stood out above the rest. So, drum roll please……..

Winner of the 16-18 category

I bet your drum roll’s not as good as the drumming skills of these very worthy winners - the Antsiranana Boy Scouts group! The scouts wrote and performed a song about climate change and its effects on the hawksbill turtle, which nests on the beaches of Northern Madagascar where the boys live. The scouts conduct all their awareness raising activities in collaboration with Community Centred Conservation (C3).

The Antsiranana Boy Scouts say, “We will be performing this song in local rural communities, but hope that people all over the world will watch online and learn more about the effects of climate change on the fano hara (hawksbill turtle in Malagasy) and what can be done to help.”

Winner of the 12-15 category

The polar bear is the star of the show in this poetic piece of song-writing by 14 year–old Emmy, from the US. Download the polar bear song.

Photo of polar bear swimming

Winner of the under 11 category

And finally, the prize for the under 11 category goes to Marcus and Kalina from the the UK. Top marks for entertainment. Flying fish anyone?

 

Marcus and Kalina’s teacher, Tasha Waldman, believes that educating children about climate change helps to raise awareness of our planet, giving understanding and hope to future generations. Marcus comments “Global warming is important because it is changing our planet and we need to help animals who can’t change with it“. Kalina agrees saying, “Lots of animals are dying and it’s our fault. It’s not just minor, it’s a MAJOR problem“. Wise words from some of our youngest contestants.

Get involved

Why not share one of the Creative Climate Change Challenge winning entries, helping our worthy winners to get their voice and message about climate change heard around the globe.

You can also let us know what you’re doing to help combat climate change by entering your comments below or joining in the conversation on Facebook, Twitter or Google+.

Congratulations to all our winners and a big thank you to all who took part in ARKive’s Creative Climate Change Challenge.

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