Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Sea turtles have been roaming the Earth for 110 million years, once sharing the planet with T-Rex and other dinosaurs!

2) Sea turtles migrate thousands of kilometres in their lifetime through the oceans and high seas. One female leatherback turtle travelled more than 19,000km across the Pacific Ocean, from Indonesia to the USA and back!

3) A baby turtle’s sex is determined mostly by the temperatures of the sand they’re buried in, below 30˚C is usually male; and above 30˚C is usually female.

4) Green sea turtles can hold their breath for up to five hours, but their feeding dives usually only last five minutes or less, before they come back to the surface for air.

5) Sea turtles can detect the Earth’s magnetic field and use it as a compass to navigate long distances. Who needs Google Maps when you have built-in sat-nav!

6) The Hawaiian green sea turtle, known locally as ‘Honu’, symbolises good luck, endurance and long life. Hawaiians believe turtles can show up as a person’s guardian spirit, known as Aumakua, to guide the way home.

7) Green turtles are named for the layer of green fat that lies under their shell. Scientists believe this unusual quirky-coloured fat is a result of their veggie diet.

8) Sea turtles are super-strong swimmers, they propel through the water using their strong paddle-like flippers. While these awesome animals like to cruise along at around 3km/h, they can reach speeds of 35km/h if threatened!

9) A turtle’s shell is actually part of its skeleton, which is made up of over 50 bones that include the turtle’s rib cage and spine.

10) These cold-blooded creatures become sexually mature at around 20-30 years old, but often die before they reach 50 years old due to predation and no pension scheme. They do; however, enter the property ladder quite early, with their shells forming within the first 30 days of life.

 

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) The lion’s mane jellyfish has been on Earth since before the dinosaurs – they’ve been floating around in the ocean for around 650 million years.

2) This species earned its name from its red and yellow tentacles, which it has up to 1,200 of, that are very similar to the colour and structure of a lion’s mane (see image below)!

3) It can grow to over 2m wide, with tentacles up to 60m long – that’s longer than an Olympic-sized swimming pool!

4) Jellyfish have to digest their food really fast – if they didn’t they wouldn’t be able to float and would be weighed down by their dinner!

5) In an extreme example of one-size-fits-all, a jelly’s mouth is also its jet propulsion unit (cool!) and eh.. also its bum (gross!).

6) Like all jellies, the lion’s mane jellyfish has no brain, blood, or nervous system. Hold on, does that make it a zombie?!

 

 

7) As if having some of the same characteristics as a zombie wasn’t freaky enough, jellyfish can also clone themselves! Being asexual, they are able to create both eggs and sperm so they don’t need a mate to create any offspring.

8) The lion’s mane jellyfish is bioluminescent, meaning it has the ability to create its own light and glow in the dark.

9) Every animal needs a nemesis, and the lion’s mane jellyfish has a mortal enemy in the leatherback turtle that feeds almost exclusively on jellyfish.

10) This may surprise you, but you can actually eat jellyfish, and it’s been on the menu of Chinese, Korean and Japanese restaurants for some time! With jellyfish thriving in overfished areas, you might see it slipping onto your plate more frequently in the not-too-distant future!

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Blue whales are the largest animals ever known to have lived on Earth, growing to lengths of up to nearly 30m – that’s the length of two double decker buses!

2) Everything about this whale is huge apart from its diet of tiny krill, which it eats up to 40 million of every day.

3) A blue whale’s tongue alone can weigh as much as an elephant – the world’s largest land mammal

4) A blue whale’s heart is so huge, around the size of a car, its beat can be detected from over three kilometres away.

5) The blood vessels of blue whales are so wide you could swim through them, but we don’t recommend trying it.

6) Even the babies are massive, being born at lengths of up to 6m and weighing nearly 4,000kg!

7) Baby blue whales put any bodybuilder to shame, gaining up to 90kg a day until they reach a pretty sizeable 15m in length. Their growth rate is one of the fastest in the animal world. #Hulk

8) Blue whales belong to the ‘baleen’ whale family, meaning instead of teeth they have baleen, a fibrous material that looks a bit like the head of a sweeping brush, used to filter their food as they swim.

9) To communicate with each other, blue whales make a series of super-loud vocal sounds. Their calls are one of the loudest of any creature on the planet, audible to other blue whales up to 500 miles away!

10) Despite being hunted to near extinction, with only 1% of their population remaining, blue whales have started to make a comeback and numbers are the highest they’ve been in decades.

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) A crab’s shell acts similarly to our skeleton is but located on the outside of its body, acting as a suit of armour to protect it from predators.

2) Most crabs have evolved flat bodies, helping them to squeeze into very narrow crevices.


3) The largest crab in the world is the giant Japanese spider crab, which can measure up to 4m across! That’s one mighty big Krabby Patty!

4) Pea crabs are the smallest of all crabs, and guess what?! They are about the size of a pea.

5) The boxer crab of Hawaii carries a pair of stinging anemones in its claws as protection – feisty! Although they actually look more like a cheerleader than a boxer.

6) Crabs live in more different habitats than any other sea animal, found almost everywhere in the ocean from smoking volcanic vents thousands of feet under the sea, to underneath the freezing ice of Antarctica.


7) A crab may lose a claw or leg in a fight, but in time, the claw or leg grows back. That’s ‘handy’!

8) A crab’s shell does not grow or stretch. So when it gets bigger, a crack forms along the shell and then the crab backs out of it. The crab then has to wait for its new, exposed outer surface to harden.

9) Bromeliad crab mothers are so caring, they place old snail shells in the water around their babies to boost their calcium uptake so that they develop super strong shells!

10) If a male Australian fiddler crab’s burrow is being invaded by an intruder, his neighbour will leave his own burrow to help fight off the intruder. Everybody needs good neighbours!

 

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species, sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Outside of its natural range, the lionfish is a very invasive species with none or very few natural predators.

2) The lionfish has an array of up to 18 needle-like dorsal fins filled with venom, used to ward off would-be predators.

3) It is an ambush hunter and relies on camouflage and lightning-fast reflexes to capture its prey, which are mainly fish and shrimp.

4) Lionfish will occasionally spread out their fins and herd small prey fish into confined spaces, almost like a sheepdog herding sheep, which makes it much easier to catch them.

5) As they are so invasive in non-native areas and a plague coral reefs, SCUBA divers and chefs are introducing lionfish to restaurant menus across the Americas, in the hope we can eat our way to conservation! Apparently they’re delicious, but mind the spines!

6) A single female can release 30,000 eggs every 4 days in the right conditions -that’s 2 million eggs per year!

7) On heavily invaded sites, lionfish have reduced native fish populations by up to 90%.

8) A lionfish’s stomach can expand up to 30 times its normal volume. An expensive dinner guest!

9) The largest recorded lionfish to date measured nearly 50cm in length.

10) Lionfish have been visually confirmed at a depth of 305m (1000ft), showing that they’re not too fussy where they live so long as there’s a meal to be had!

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