Apr 14

ARKive and the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) have partnered to celebrate this year’s Environmental Education (EE) Week.  The largest celebration of environmental education in America, EE Week strives to connect people to nature through a new theme each year. This year’s theme is ‘Taking Technology Outdoors’ and we’ve organized a fantastic list of guest bloggers who are using ARKive outside to connect their students and children to nature. Be sure to visit the ARKive blog every day this week for a new guest blogger with an inspirational story.

Here to share a little more background on EE Week and more ways to get involved this week is Sarah, the Education Program Coordinator at NEEF:

EE Week logo

It’s spring, and as the weather begins to warm, thoughts turn to outdoor activities. In today’s era of tech gadgets and global connectivity, there are new and exciting ways to connect young people with the wildlife in their communities.

Join National Environmental Education Week (EE Week) for Greening STEM: Taking Technology Outdoors, April 14-20, 2013 and explore how technology can enhance environmental learning both inside and outside the classroom.

Hosted by the National Environmental Education Foundation, EE Week is the largest celebration of environmental education in the United States held each year the week before Earth Day and inspires environmental learning and stewardship.

In 2012, EE Week kicked off a multi-year Greening STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) initiative on the important role the environment plays in engaging students in STEM learning and helping them solve 21st century challenges.

The environment provides a gateway to STEM learning through hands-on, real-world projects on topics like energy efficiency and resource conservation that incorporate all four pillars of STEM.

Research indicates that 77% of teachers in the US believe using technology in the classroom increases student motivation to learn, while 75% of 1,900 surveyed educators in the US said students who spend regular time outdoors tend to be more creative and better problem-solvers.

View and share NEEF’s new infographic ‘Tech & Our Planet’ inspired by this year’s EE Week theme:

NEEF/EE Week Infograph

Providing students with opportunities to connect with and learn about nature through technology can also mean improved workforce readiness: in the US, STEM jobs are expected to increase by 20.6% between 2008 and 2018, compared to 10.1% for all other jobs, and 71% of STEM jobs will be within the technology field.

Connect with EE Week on Facebook and Twitter to learn more, and join us for a Tweet Chat on Greening STEM starting on April 15 at 1 PM ET, using the hashtag #EEWeek. And be sure to visit the ARKive blog each day for a new inspirational story on how teachers and parents are ‘Taking Technology Outdoors’ with ARKive!

Sarah Kozicki, Education Program Coordinator, National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF)

Apr 9

ARKive is proud to partner with the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF), an organization dedicated to connecting kids and adults alike with environmental knowledge that can improve the quality of their lives and the health of the planet. Every year, NEEF spearheads Environmental Education (EE) Week – the largest celebration of environmental education in the US. This year’s theme is ‘Taking Technology Outdoors’ which is a perfect opportunity to explore all the ways that the ARKive collection can be used to inspire and enhance connections with the natural world.

The ARKive team has come up with a few fun, extension activities to our free classroom lessons for any adult to use to lead kids on outdoor explorations in their own backyards or local green spaces. The activities can be done with or without the accompanying lesson.

Web of Wildlife (7-11 year olds)

ARKive's web of wildlifePhotograph your local food chain. In this activity, kids spend time outdoors trying to locate different types of food sources. They take a picture of each food item they find including grass, acorns and even small critters that are food for birds and other animals. Kids then create a poster using print-outs of the food source pictures and drawings of other species that rely on those food sources. Using lessons learned in the Web of Wildlife activity and using ARKive as a resource, kids can draw lines between food sources and species to illustrate the local food web.

Biodiversity Hospital (11-14 year olds)

ARKive's Biodiversity Hospital lessonBe a conservation photographer. A conservation photographer has the ability to capture an environmental story in a single image. In this activity, kids play the role of conservation photographers and try to capture, in one image, any conservation threats in their hometown. The photograph should speak for itself and taking on the role of a ‘doctor’, the kids should try to prescribe a solution to the problem. They then take turns showing their picture to friends and family who try to identify the conservation threat and potential remedies.

Species Discovery (7-11 & 11-14 year olds)

Species Discovery

Catch new-to-you species on film. Using a smartphone with a video recording feature, trek outdoors and help kids to capture any species that are new to them on camera. From city-dwelling birds to local flower species they may have never noticed before, kids log their findings on camera and then explore the ARKive site to find a species that closely matches their discoveries. Kids should try to identify the features that are similar whether its color, beak shape, etc. Choosing one of the species they caught on camera, kids can get creative by thinking of their own scientific name for it.

NEEF guest bloggers

We also have an exciting line-up of guest bloggers who will be appearing on the ARKive blog during EE Week to share their adventures with the activities above and other ways they’ve used ARKive and technology to get kids outside. Our friends from NEEF will be kicking things off for us next Monday!

If you are interested in joining in the ARKive/EE Week celebrations by doing one of the above activities, feel free to share a short paragraph on your experience and a picture with us at education@wildscreenusa.org. We’ll in turn publish your story in an ARKive blog at the end of EE Week sharing it with thousands of readers in the US and beyond.

Happy Outdoor Exploration!

Liana Vitali, ARKive Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

Apr 3

Hello my fine feathered ARKiver’s. My name is George Rowe and I am a Producer at Thought Den, a digital design agency based in Bristol, UK. We’ve been lucky enough to work with ARKive on a couple of exciting projects, including ‘Survival’ their endangered species gaming app, and I wanted to tell you a little about our most recent: Team WILD.

Why did ARKive choose us? We’re a specialist digital studio and our working philosophy is that of ‘playful learning’. People engage more deeply, learn better, and are generally more involved with content if they can experience it through play.

Games are rewarding because we are evolutionarily hardwired to enjoy learning patterns. And games that reflect real challenges have even more appeal. If the content of these challenges is also educational then so much the better!

Original logos for Team WILD

The IDEA

Team WILD began life as an idea called ‘The Wildlife Apprentice’, an online game that would get kids to engage with scientific careers.

In the early meetings it was clear there were two different routes we could take with this game. We could either try and TEACH in the game, actively having people complete puzzles based on curricula learning outcomes (a la Manga High), or we could REINFORCE classroom learning with a game that would let kids explore the concepts in a playful way. Naturally, our preference was for the latter.

Science IS cool, but our challenge here was to find a way of showing the amazing things scientists do in an engaging and plausible wrapper. ‘The Wildlife Apprentice’ was a nice simple hook to hang it on, but it was quickly shelved due to potential copyright issues. What other hooks could we use to frame our game? Some ideas from our original proposal:

  • Science Armageddon: all the scientists have vanished. You must now do all the science!
  • Alien Scientist: you have infiltrated ARKive’s science department. You must now do science well enough so you are not discovered!
  • Science Superheroes: A team of science superheroes need your help to do science! You must travel the world doing science!

The question we ended up asking ourselves was: who wouldn’t want to be a science superhero?

The team at ARKive spoke with some tame scientists to learn more about the tasks they performed. Once we had our mega list of science, we sat down with the Key Stage 3 UK National Curriculum and our own list of game types and mechanics and explored different ways to turn these activities into individual mini-games.

Team WILD wireframes

Team WILD wireframes

Scientists survey predator and prey on the savannah to work out the dynamics between them. What if you were running along the savannah, pressing keys to count predator and prey? An idea was born. And scientists collect uninfected frogs in the jungles of Montserrat to breed them? This thing is designing itself!

Reward is also a key mechanic in games; it gives an extra little nudge for players to try again, to try and do BETTER. Along with the classic highscore table, by scoring enough points in Team WILD you can also join the team and unlock super cool treats.

Original character sketches for Team WILD

Original character sketches for Team WILD

The LOOK

From the outset we thought a comic/graphic novelesque style had the balance of fun with a slightly more adult edge. Once the concepts were finalised we brought in specialist games illustrator Nat Al-Tahhan to create our science superhero characters. Wanting to get away from the whole ‘scientists wear white coats’ stigma, we decided to give our heroes lab CAPES instead.

Parallax scrolling, where different layers move at different speeds to give an illusion of depth, was used for this exact purpose. Our wonder-intern Ellen created the beautiful layers for these (as well as the Team WILD logo), under the tutelage of Creative Director Ben T and Senior Designer Ben W. Ben W then tied everything together with a lovely user interface and some spit and polish.

The BUILD

An important part of any game project these days is deciding what platform you are going to produce for. We decided to go with a faithful Flash game for a number of reasons: it’s a proven platform, nearly every school computer can run it, and it delivers the most bang for buck.

Our Senior Developer Corin nailed the game mechanics, parallax scrolling backgrounds and interface screens, while developer Ben M (we have a lot of Ben’s) whipped up the backend for the highscore tables.

We took a beta version of Team WILD into a couple of local schools in Bristol for some essential user testing. The kids liked the games, and though some understood the science content it wasn’t quite clear enough, so we took the decision to add in some more feedback information after each play.

Screenshot of African savannah level on Team WILD

The GAME

So, after another couple of weeks of refinement, play testing and level design we had a game!

Play Team WILD

Team WILD has had around 80,000 plays so far and an average play time of six and a half minutes, which is really great for an online science-based game.

We really admire the work that ARKive do, and the chance to work with them again was really fantastic. Hopefully Team WILD will help inspire some conservationists of the future.

George Rowe, Thought Den Producer & Studio Manager

Mar 22

Last week saw the ExCel centre in London host the 5th annual Big Bang Fair, the largest celebration of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) for young people in the UK. The aim of the fair is to introduce young people to the wide range of career opportunities available in STEM subjects and quite simply show them how awesome STEM can be. Once again, the ARKive team were delighted to attend, and spent four fun-filled days engaging with the next generation of scientists.

Claire at stand

Over the course of the event, 65,000 visitors descended upon the show floor to take part in all that the Big Bang has to offer, including 60 interactive activity stands and 88 workshop sessions from 180 different organisations. Along with the hordes of children, parents and teachers, the Big Bang Fair also welcomed a famous face or two, including David Cameron, Professor Brian Cox, TV Presenter Liz Bonnin and Business Secretary Vince Cable who opened the fair on Thursday morning. Of course, the two most exciting VIPs in attendance were our very own science superheroes Root and Flora, members of Team WILD’s elite conservation task force.

Brownies

Picnic area at lunch

Root and Flora’s mission at the fair was to help the rest of the ARKive team recruit new members for Team WILD, an exciting new online game which aims to introduce young people to both environmental issues and potential job opportunities in conservation. Through the power of stickers (number distributed: 1,661), word quickly spread around the fair and the number of Team WILD recruits rose rapidly. The new team members soon proved themselves to be of a high calibre, achieving some very impressive high scores. Due to these incredible scores, Team WILD decided to award one special commendation to the top scorer in each of the four mini-games. These prestigious awards go to the following rookie recruits:

Root FloraJungle
Daniel Nichols: 1,237

Aquatic
George Murray: 2,278

Deforested
Elliott: 2,297

Savannah
James: 2,319

 

Massive congratulations to everybody at the fair who came along to take the Team WILD challenge. For those of you who didn’t get a chance to play on the day, or for those of you who want to try and smash your current high scores, why not head over to our Team WILD page and give it a go! If you need any convincing, Team WILD was described by one young fan as being ‘like Super Mario, but with animals’…what could be better?!

Superman

Missed out on The Big Bang Fair this year? Keep an eye on the official website for information about next year’s fair and for details on other similar events near you. See you all next year!

The ARKive STEM Team

Mar 19

Education Resources Awards 2013 Winners of Education Resources Awards 2013 were announced on Friday with ARKive being awarded Best Primary Resource or Equipment – involving ICT. 

The Education Resources Awards honour the quality and diversity of educational products and resources, educational establishments and the most dedicated members of the industry. In their fifteenth successful year, the Education Resources Awards are organised by BESA, the trade association representing educational suppliers in the UK sector, and Brilliant Marketing.

The judges, an independent panel of experienced educational professionals, most of whom are classroom teachers, felt that the team at Wildscreen were passionate about connecting people with the natural world and ensuring that more people experience and are inspired by nature.

Caroline Wright, Director, BESA comments: “What makes these Awards different is that they focus on the resources, services and the people that really make an impact on learning and the day-to-day work of the teachers in the classroom. We would like to congratulate Wildscreen for the quality of ARKive.”

Richard Edwards, Chief Executive of Wildscreen said, “Wildscreen’s mission is to use the power of wildlife imagery to inspire greater awareness, understanding and appreciation of the natural world. We are always exploring new and innovative ways of reaching greater audiences, and through ARKive, our leading public engagement and education initiative, we’re looking to reach the younger generation and inspire the conservationists and environmental stewards of tomorrow. We are delighted to win such an important award which recognises our educational work.”

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