Feb 8

Today marks the start of Chinese New Year, with millions of people around the world taking part in colourful celebrations. Each Chinese New Year is characterised by one of 12 animals which appear in the Chinese Zodiac. This year it’s the Year of the Monkey, the 9th of the 12 animals in the Zodiac.

As well as sharing the monkey sign with celebrity environmentalists Tom Hanks, Bo Derek and Gisele Bündchen, people born under the monkey sign are said to share certain character traits. To mark the start of the New Year, we’ve swung around the Arkive collection to reveal the personality traits people born in the Year of the Monkey share with their wild relatives.

Witty

People born in the Year of the Monkey are thought to have a good sense of humour, like this guy…

Golden langur sticking tongue out

…they’re also partial to monkeying around like this pair having a snowball fight…

Japanese macaques play fighting in snow

Japanese macaques play fighting in snow

and they’re not afraid of taking risks…

Barbary macaques playing dangerously near a cliff edge

Barbary macaques playing dangerously near a cliff edge

Intelligent

With expressive faces monkeys are really charismatic but they aren’t just interesting to look at, they are also very intelligent. They are particularly bright when it comes to finding food.

From swimming to find the best food…

Assam macaque swimming

Assam macaque swimming

…to washing it before eating it…

Japanese macaque running to sea to clean a sweet potato

Japanese macaque running to sea to clean a sweet potato

…many monkey species know how to feed their appetites. But they also know to make sure they get their vitamins and minerals. Take these gray langurs licking rocks to obtain salt…

Group of gray langurs at natural salt lick

Group of gray langurs at natural salt lick

…and this dusky leaf monkey whose found water on tap…

Dusky leaf monkey drinking from tap

Dusky leaf monkey drinking from tap

Mischievous

The Endangered Barbary macaque is the only native species of primate to occur in Europe. But like its relatives, this monkey has a rather mischievous side. Like all macaques, they have cheek pouches beside the lower teeth that are used to store food when foraging and can hold as much food as the stomach. But why forage when you can just steal? Watch this cheeky monkey steel food from another’s cheek pouch.

Click image to watch video of Barbary macaque stealing food from another's mouth

Click image to watch video of Barbary macaque stealing food from another’s mouth

Ultimately, monkeys they know how to have a good time…

Click image to watch video

Click image to watch video

 
Happy New Year

新年好

新年好

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: White-backed vulture

Nominated by: Colchester Zoo – Action for the Wild

Conservation status: Critically Endangered

Why do you love it? Vultures are so important to our ecosystem as they represent natures ‘dustman’, removing carcases that may spread disease to humans and other wildlife. They are not just scavengers, they are actually relatively successful hunters. Seeing them fly together circling in the skies is a breath taking sight as they fly with grace with such a large wing span. Overall they are very smart birds with great individual characters, we need vultures!

What are the threats to the white-backed vulture? The most threatened group of birds in the world, there has been a massive population decline in recent years especially in West Africa. Threats to the species consist of poisoning and hunting, along with habitat loss which results in lack of food availability.

What are you doing to save it? Colchester Zoo supports a number of vulture conservation projects through their charity Action for the Wild these include Gyps Vulture Restoration Project and VulPro. One of Colchester Zoo’s keepers has been out to Africa and volunteered at VulPro and went on to help at the Vulture Conservation Project Seminar, you can find out more about the projects and keeper, Kat’s, experience on our website.

Find out more about Colchester Zoo’s Action for Wildlife project

Discover more hawk, eagle, kite and harrier species on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

Jan 21

Can you think of a species that you think is often overlooked and underappreciated? We asked this question to conservation organisations around the world for our Valentine’s Day #LoveSpecies campaign and have collated a list of almost 100 species. These species will be entered into a poll and you can vote for your favourite from  February 1st.

These species may not be the cutest…

…cuddliest…

…most charismatic…

…handsome…

Proboscis monkey

… or well-known…

Sunset frog

…but they deserve our love too!

Starting February 1st, each species will be featured on our blog, with a plea from the conservation organisation that nominated it for why it should get your vote. Voting will also open on February 1st and you’ll be able to choose your favourite until February 14th so you’ve got plenty of time to read the blogs and decide which species deserves its moment in the limelight.

WATCH THIS SPACE!

Jan 5

2015 saw Arkive go truly global. Over the year, we had visitors from over 240 countries and territories, with visits from over 80 different countries every day! We also went on the move, with around a quarter of all visitors viewing Arkive via mobile.

But what content did you love the most in 2015? Find out below…

1. Most watched video

Diving into the top spot as the most watched video on Arkive for the FIFTH year in a row is this osprey fishing. You can’t seem to get enough of its fishing prowess!

Osprey fishing video

The second most watched video of 2015 was this king cobra predating upon an Indian cobra.

2. Most popular species

Sliding its way to the top spot in 2015 is the extremely colourful Common garter snake from North America.

Common garter snake species profile

3. Most read blog

Everybody loves a hero and this year, you loved our conservation heroes. 2015 saw the introduction of our new Conservation Heroes blog series featuring amazing individuals and groups from across the globe who dedicate their lives to the conservation of the natural world.

Dr. Laurie Marker, Cheetah Conservation Fund photo

Dr. Laurie Marker, Cheetah Conservation Fund

4. Most popular topic page

In a year in which Cecil the lion featured in news headlines around the world and Discovery premiered the film Racing Extinction in more than 220 countries and territories on the same day, endangered species and their plight captured the hearts and minds of millions of people globally.  Endangered species was also the most popular topic page on Arkive.

Golden-crowned sifaka photo

5. Most downloaded education resource

Our education resources reached over 8.5 million students around the world in 2015. Once again it was the topic of endangered species that seemed to capture the attention the most with our What is an Endangered Species? education resource for 7-11 year olds being the most downloaded resource of 2015.

Photo of ARKive School Museum masks

Aug 17

The Wildscreen Exchange is a dynamic new conservation initiative by the creators of Arkive. Using some of the best filmmakers and photographers on Earth, Wildscreen are creating films and photos that tell the stories of some the natural world’s most overlooked yet beautifully unique species and the amazing people who have dedicated their lives to help them. Please help us tell their stories while we can still do it in the present tense.

You can vote once a day, every day (if you’d like to!) by writing ‘I #vote for @WildscreenEx #UpgradeYourWorld’ on Twitter or Instagram. Or you can vote on Facebook by tagging the Wildscreen Exchange Facebook page and writing the same phrase as above. Voting closes on August 23rd.
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You can see some of the images created by Exchange photographers, alongside thousands of other images that have been kindly donated by some of the world’s best wildlife photographers, on our website. These images are freely available to conservation organisations to use in their non-commercial communications, saving vital resources, budget and time.

Watch the Exchange promotional video featuring Sir David Attenborough here.

Thanks in advance!

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