Apr 14

This week Arkive has been celebrating the US premiere of the environmental documentary Tomorrow, (Demain le Film). We’ve been featuring a guest blogs throughout the week, with documentary contributors discussing the global issues featured in Tomorrow.

Tomorrow’s US premier is in San Francisco TODAY! 14th April 2017. Find the Tomorrow Facebook or visit the website for a full run-down and trailer.

“Without question, this is absolutely the best and most creative film on the future of humanity and the environment.” – Paul Hawken, leading environmentalist

Tomorrow trailer

Tomorrow trailer

Who are you?

Cyril Dion. Almost 39. French. Married with two kids. I’m a filmmaker, writer, poet and ecological activist.

I also wrote and co-directed Tomorrow, it is my baby! It took me five years to make this project a reality, and I never thought it would take me to 17 countries and more than 120 cities.

I have always tried to find ways to express myself artistically and to be as useful as possible to people and the planet. First, I was an actor, then I studied and practiced natural medicine. I organised Israeli-Palestinian congresses including the very first two world congress of Imams and Rabbis for peace. I co-founded and directed an ecological NGO for seven years, created and ran a magazine, wrote three books, and now directed a movie.

Problems facing your field of expertise from an environmental/sustainability perspective?

Basically, a part of humanity could disappear by the end of the century if we keep on living as we do, especially in the western world. A few years ago, a study conducted by one of NASA’s lab showed that civilisations usually collapse when two factors combine: when we destroy natural resources faster than they can restore themselves, and when social inequality become unbearable.

We currently experience both problems. Unfortunately, this study is not the only one. Hundreds of them have been published all around the world warning us of the dangers of climate change, mass extinction of species, pollution, exploitation of people and nature.

Climate change effects include sea levels getting higher, ice melting at the poles, and extreme weather events like hurricanes and droughts becoming more common. Many animals are also struggling to survive as their habitats change.

If the current rate of deforestation continues, it is thought that the world’s forests will be gone in just 100 years.

Do you have any suggested solutions to the problems Tomorrow confronts?

I can build on what I have learned while travelling the world for the film. We need to shift from a material-oriented society where making money, buying stuff and creating economic growth is the main goal, to a world where we are living meaningful lives; being in harmony with nature and with each other is our priority. The good news, is that we have the know-how to gather everything we need: food, shelter, healthcare, money, great job, and community we can rely on.

One particularly interesting way could be to replicate what nature does and adapt it to our human organisations: circular processes, efficiency in networks, creating no waste, restoration abilities, nurture a very high level of diversity. Diversity is the key, if you have a forest with only one type of tree, when disease strikes, the whole forest is gone. But if you have different type of trees, some variety will resist more than others and the ecosystem has much better chances of surviving. It is what we call resilience.

Concretely, this means that we must not encourage monocultures, whether it is in agriculture (growing only one kind of crop on huge fields), in economy (having just a few big businesses trusting the all world with their food, clothes, furniture and so on), in energy (relying on fossil fuels), etc. It is too fragile.

We need to develop greater autonomy and diversity everywhere: organic food systems, local renewable energy, strong local economies with a lot of diverse independent businesses and to link all these territories to each other to have millions of local, ecological, economies interconnected.

Cyril has presented Tomorrow across the globe, including screenings at screened at the UN in NYC and at the European Parliament, during the COP21 in Paris.

Please describe your personal feelings on the importance of conveying Tomorrows message, and what impact you hope for it to have upon its audience?

We may face the biggest challenge human race has ever experienced. So, to me, nothing could be more important than empowering people to fix our ecological, social and economic problems! To do so, we tried to do something different from scary, depressing, and catastrophic documentaries pointing fingers at culprits.

I think Tomorrow is the first 100% solution-oriented documentary about ecology, economy, education, democracy… It carries another vision for the future. It is also trying to tell a story, our story: young parents preoccupied by the future of their children, trying to find new ways to make the world a better place. We wanted the movie to be pedagogical but as the same time moving and pleasant to watch with a lot of music, nice photography.

It has been released in more than 20 countries already and had a lot of impact in France, Belgium, Switzerland, and Canada where it has been seen by almost two million people… It’s been screened at the UN in NYC, at the European Parliament, during the COP21 in Paris.

We continuously receive hundreds of messages of women and men telling us what they’ve been doing after seeing the movie. We even opened a section on the French website called « the day after tomorrow » to collect these stories and actions. People start permaculture gardens, change their electricity supplier, move their money to local or ethical banks, start new jobs to be useful to their community or to the planet, some businesses are being launched, some local governments are taking actions… It would take a book to tell everything! So I hope it will happen in the US also.

 Final words to convey to the audience?

Just that we have the power to change the world if we want to.

You can follow Cyril and his work on Twitter, Facebook or on his website. All that’s left now is to say thank you to Cyril and the many other who worked tirelessly on Tomorrow to share with us a message which many would consider the most urgent problems facing our planet to date. We hope you all go out and watch it!

Apr 13

This week Arkive is celebrating the US premiere of the environmental documentary Tomorrow, (Demain le Film). We’ll be featuring a guest blog each day this week, with documentary contributors discussing the global issues featured in Tomorrow.

Tomorrow’s US premiere is in San Francisco this Friday, 14th April 2017. Find the Tomorrow Facebook or visit the website for a full run-down and trailer.

“Without question, this is absolutely the best and most creative film on the future of humanity and the environment.” – Paul Hawken, leading environmentalist

Tomorrow trailer

Tomorrow trailer

Who are you?

My name is Robert Reed. I am a spokesman for Recology, San Francisco’s recycling and kerb side composting collection company. I am a writer and an advocate for zero waste, and former journalist. I am very enthusiastic about recycling and particularly about urban compost collection programs.

What is your field of research?

I do a lot of research. Much of my focus centres on urban compost collection programmes. That means collecting food scraps and plant cuttings separately from other trash, turning this organic matter into finished compost, and using it to feed microbial colonies in topsoil to grow cover crops that fix carbon and nitrogen in the soil. I believe this is our best chance to slow down climate change.

Robert and part of his team at Recology

Please could you describe your connection with Tomorrow?

The filmmakers contacted me and asked me to tour them through our recycling and compost programs. They decided to feature me as one of the citizens in the film who are engaged in programmes that help achieve environmental/social benefits.

The film Tomorrow is a great achievement because, unlike other documentaries, it focuses almost exclusively on solutions. The world is hungry for positive narratives and this film is central to a new movement to highlight solutions. For these reasons and more I am very enthusiastic about Tomorrow.

Problems facing your field of expertise from a sustainability perspective?

First problem: More than half of the trash in the world is incinerated. Another big portion is buried in landfills. This destroys resources. The U.S. is home to 3,000 active landfills, but less than 300 facilities that are permitted to compost food scraps. So we have in infrastructure problem. Many cities and universities want to replicate San Francisco’s urban compost collection programme but they can’t because we don’t have enough compost facilities.

Many wildlife species are forced to move from their habitats due to the increase of human impact, many try to adjust to but often die in the process, where it is more and more common for birds to be found having ingested plastic bags, bottle caps, synthetic clothing fibres.

Second problem: We need collectively to shine a bright light on the compost solution – cities sending food scraps to farms in the form of compost and farms using that compost to grow cover crops. This combination turns farms into carbon sinks. I believe doing so is our best chance to try to slow down climate change. I have very experienced and skilled friends and acquaintances who believe this solution is so effective that if implemented widely it could reverse climate change.

Do you have any suggested solutions to the problems Tomorrow confronts?

I try to live by example. When Trump was elected I made a personal commitment to do an additional 12 days a year of community service. The solutions almost never come from large governments or corporations. They are making money off they current structure and, therefore, resist change. I, and countless others support the approach of local solutions. A city makes a zero waste goal. A nearby city also makes a zero waste goal, and many others do they same. Then they form a union. They link. That is how you build a movement. That is how you achieve positive change that benefits all.

Tomorrow shows many examples of how this can happen, of how we can create a healthier world.

It is not a question of ‘can we do it?’ it’s an ‘I’m-paying-attention, eyes-wide-open’ perspective. If you are open and honest you know this – we have to do right by the planet and society. It is the only choice.

Please describe your personal feelings on the importance of conveying Tomorrow’s message, and what impact you hope for it to have upon its audience?

The larger message of this documentary – that solutions exist, that we can create a healthier world is tremendously important. Please take a friend to see this film.

The people who made this film worked extraordinarily hard. They had a small budget and impossibly tight schedule. On the morning I met them they were exhausted. But when asked to get up and do more they did exactly that. They suffered so we could have the opportunity to watch this film. Watch it!

 Thank you, Robert, for speaking to us. We’d like to heed his words and say, go watch it!

Apr 11

This week Arkive is celebrating the US premiere of the environmental documentary Tomorrow, (Demain le Film). We’ll be featuring a guest blog each day this week, with documentary contributors discussing the global issues featured in Tomorrow.

Tomorrow’s US premiere is in San Francisco this Friday, 14th April 2017. Find the Tomorrow Facebook or visit the website for a full run-down and trailer.

Without question, this is absolutely the best and most creative film on the future of humanity and the environment.” – Paul Hawken, leading environmentalist

Tomorrow trailer

Tomorrow trailer

 Who are you?

Anthony D. Barnosky – Executive Director at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford University and Professor at the Department of Integrative Biology, University of California-Berkeley

Please could you describe your connection with Tomorrow?

Along with my wife Elizabeth Hadly and several others, I was a co-author of the scientific report “Approaching a state-shift in the biosphere” (Nature 486:52-56) which inspired Cyril and Mélanie to make the movie.

What are the problems facing your field of expertise from an environmental perspective?

Most of my work has been on climate change, the ongoing extinction crisis, and the loss of ecosystems.  We know the causes of these crises, and we know most of the science and technology needed to fix them.  The biggest obstacle to solutions are the social ones: people need to be made aware of what is at stake, what the solutions are, and they need to be motivated to cooperate to emplace the solutions.

Do you have any suggested solutions to the problems Tomorrow confronts?

The solution to climate change is rapidly transitioning the global energy system from one based on fossil fuels to carbon-neutral technologies. For the stationary energy system (largely electricity generation), this can be done by a combination of solar, wind, wave, and hydro power and increasing energy efficiency in buildings.  For the transportation system, it can be done by transitioning to electric and hydrogen-fuel vehicles, and a shift to sustainable biofuels.

For increasing food production—necessary to feed an additional 2-3 billion people that will be on the planet by 2050—the answers lie in more efficient production in agricultural lands already under production rather than taking over new lands that other species need, wasting less food, and eating less meat.

Land conversion for agriculture is believed to be the world’s biggest driver of deforestation, especially in tropical areas.

We also must stabilise world population below 10 billion people – what works for this is providing educational opportunities and access to medical care (including contraceptives for those who want them) in parts of the world where they are now lacking, especially for women.

Urbanisation is the process by which human settlements expand into the natural areas that surround them, leading to the removal of forests, wetlands, grasslands and other ecosystems.

 

What are your personal feelings on the importance of conveying Tomorrow’s message, and what impact do you hope for it to have upon the audience?

Tomorrow shows us not only what the world can be, but what it already is in various parts of the planet – a society where people take local action to solve global issues and thereby make their own lives much more pleasurable.  Sometimes world problems seem so big that people lose sight of the fact that the only effective solutions start at home, in our own communities. Tomorrow reminds us of that, shows us the path forward, and makes us realise that the future can be as bright as we decide to make it.

We’d like to thank Tony for his words and speaking to us. If you’d like to know more about Rob’s work you can visit his blog, website or find him on Twitter.

 

Apr 10

This week Arkive is celebrating the US premiere of the environmental documentary Tomorrow, (Demain le Film). We’ll be featuring a guest blog each day this week, with documentary contributors discussing the global issues featured in Tomorrow.

Tomorrow’s US premier is in San Francisco this Friday, 14th April 2017. Visit the website for a full run-down and trailer.

“Without question, this is absolutely the best and most creative film on the future of humanity and the environment.” – Paul Hawken, leading environmentalist

 

Tomorrow trailer

Tomorrow trailer

Who are you?

My name is Rob Hopkins. I am a blogger, writer and public speaker, and the founder of Transition Movement. I started the first Transition initiative here in Totnes, Devon, UK, and also Transition Network, which supports the people in over 50 countries who are now doing Transition. I have won several awards for my work, including 2 honorary PhDs. I am also a father to four sons, a gardener, the director of New Lion Brewery, and was delighted to be one of the people featured in Tomorrow – I’m the guy with the £21 note!

What is your field of work?

I was a teacher of permaculture for years, before starting the Transition Movement in 2005. The area of my work is around communities, and the potential they have to organise and make things happen. I was struck that climate change felt like such a vast, existential crisis and that people were overwhelmed, and had given all their power over to leaders to sort it out. But I also saw that there was so much that communities could do. They could move faster, they were nimbler, they could be more ambitious. And that the projects they were doing were building connection, were bringing people together, and were reviving local economies. So for me, Transition is a movement of communities reimagining and rebuilding our world, and they are doing so at a time that desperately needs that.

Rob Hopkins

Rob Hopkins

Could you describe your connection with Tomorrow?

I had met Cyril Dion once before, but in 2014 he and Melanie came to Totnes to interview me for the film. I hadn’t heard of her before although, as her crew pointed out, in France she is very famous! So they filmed an interview and then went home, and I didn’t hear anything for about a year and a half. Then in December 2015, I was invited to the premiere in Paris, and it blew me away. I thought it was amazing – it made me cry at least six times. It was such an honour to see myself in it alongside other such amazing people. Its rise and impact in France, Belgium and elsewhere has been stunning to see. In France, in particular, it has been a phenomenon. When I go there now, teenagers ask me for selfies on the Metro in Paris!

Being part of it has changed my life, but more importantly, it has changed the lives of so many of those who have seen it. I went to several screenings in Paris in December 2015 and was amazed at how many young people there were. I asked them “why do you like it so much?” They told me that after the terror attacks in Paris the month before, “we don’t know what our story is anymore. Now we have our story”. That’s very powerful.

Mass coral bleaching events are happening around the world due to climate change

Mass coral bleaching events are happening around the world due to climate change

What are the problems facing your field of work, from an environmental perspective?

We are in a race against time, a race that we are losing. We are now seeing a concerted war on climate science, a rolling back of climate action and the deletion of large sections of the evidence base. At the same time we are seeing warming accelerate, Arctic ice in its death throes, all the impacts scientists predicted coming to pass. We also see our communities becoming more isolated from each other, an “epidemic of loneliness”, and communities economically left behind. Tomorrow is a film that says “it doesn’t have to be like that. We can do better than that”. I can’t think of any film that has more to say about what’s happening in the US right now, and more potential to inspire people with a new, more inspiring and appropriate story.

Do you have any suggested solutions to the problems Tomorrow confronts?

This film is full of solutions. One of the things that is radical about this film is that it turns what I call the ‘happy chapter’ convention on its head. That’s the convention where films about green issues are relentlessly miserable until the last 5 minutes when they say “ah, but we could do this”. Tomorrow gets the problems out of the way in the first 2 minutes, then they give you 3 minutes to let that settle, and then they head off to find solutions. No-one really did that before, and I notice that quite a few people are doing so since.

For me, the future needs to be more local. Climate change makes a nonsense of moving goods around the world in order to boost economic growth figures. The UK exports to Germany every year the same amount of potatoes as it imports from Germany. Let’s just email each other the recipes and make our local economies more resilient. Our local economies need to move away from their current move towards monoculture, fewer and fewer more and more powerful businesses, to a complex ecosystem of businesses, rooted in place and in the community. That’s a solution that’s better for public health, community cohesion and for economic resilience, and it is growing now, in many places.

What are your personal feelings on the importance of conveying Tomorrow’s message, and what impact do you hope for it to have upon the audience?

I have seen, time and again, the impact this film has on people. It gives them hope. It gives them workable, tried-and-tested solutions they can draw on. It’s a film about climate change they leave feeling great. It touches people deeply. The music is great. It’s funny. I think everyone should see it. Increasingly in the media, it seems like there is a general consensus that the future is going to be awful. This film confronts that head-on, asking the questions, ‘why?’ and ‘who says?’. The future could still be amazing, but we need ideas, imagination and inspiration – all of which Tomorrow provides in huge doses.

What has been most powerful about Tomorrow in France and Belgium is how it has reached a whole new audience, beyond ‘the usual suspects’ and into mainstream society. No ‘green’ film ever did that before in the same way. I hope people who see it feel fired with possibilities. Anything could happen from here. In creating this film, Cyril and Melanie have created something extraordinary, something really powerful. In the US now, people are being told that addressing climate change means fewer jobs, so we have to not address it. This film powerfully and beautifully reveals that as the nonsense it is, arguing for more holistic approach. It shows that you can’t tackle the food system without also taking on the economic system, and you can’t do that without also looking at energy and transport, and all of that is going to struggle unless we also look afresh at how we educate our kids. It’s common sense. That joined-up, holistic approach is one that people understand even if politicians don’t. There can be no more important movie being release in the US right now.

Final words…

Just that I am so pleased that Under the Milky Way have decided to distribute this film. I hope it continues to have a huge impact around the world. I think people will love it.

We’d like to thank Rob for his words and speaking to us. If you’d like to know more about Rob’s work you can visit his blog, the Transition Network website or find him on Twitter.

Jan 23

Patrick Rouxel is an environmental filmmaker and conservationist whose films include the multi award-winning Green and Alma. Patrick’s most recent film, Life Is One, was nominated for a 2016 Wildscreen Panda Award in the Creative Innovation category and has recently won the Best Wildlife Film Award at the New York Wild Film Festival.  It is the story of a return to life in the wild for three sun bear cubs in Indonesia. Patrick’s encounter with these three cubs has changed his life and he now focuses on improving the welfare of captive sun bears in Indonesia and raising awareness on their plight through his charity Sun Bear Outreach. This is his story.

Patrick Rouxel

I’ve been making films on conservation and animal welfare since 2014, specializing on the Indonesian rainforest, the Congo Basin and the Amazon. In my travels I would often come across animals kept in very bad conditions, I would usually film them and then move on. With the footage I helped raise awareness about animal suffering, but this did not change anything for those animals I had filmed. I had not altered their misery in any way.

In 2010, as I was making fundraising films for a small orangutan rescue centre based in Borneo, Indonesia, we received a small sun bear cub in a wooden box that villagers had brought in from their village. The mother bear must have been shot, but luckily the cub was brought to the rescue centre rather than sold as a pet to some private owner. She was a female that I named Bunbun and I took care of her for the several weeks. I grew very fond of her and I didn’t want her to spend the rest of her life in a cage, so this time, rather than move on, I decided to stay and give her back her freedom.

Sun bear in small cage

It took about nine months before I was actually able to bring Bunbun to the forest. The reintroduction took place in a national park with a remote camp serving as base. It was a progressive adaptation to life in the wild. I was going to stay in the forest with Bunbun until she grew fully independent. Every morning at dawn, I would let her out of her night cage and we would spend the whole day in the forest to play, explore and search for food. But she couldn’t find enough food to satisfy her appetite, and in the late afternoon, she would gladly go back to her night cage close to camp where food awaited her. She made no fuss at being locked in for the night as she knew that she would spend the whole next day in the forest again.

Bunbun

Unfortunately, after just 3 months in the forest, Bunbun disappeared, never to be seen again. She was not yet fully autonomous, so I fear for the worse. I then encountered another 2 sun bear cubs, Bernie and Wawang, in another rescue centre and decided to try another reintroduction with them. This time I had the cubs equipped with implant emitters to be able to track them down. All went very well at first and the cubs learnt a lot from one another, but after just 6 weeks, the male cub, Wawang, was killed in a fight with another wild bear. Luckily, Bernie had been spared. Wawang’s death was a blow but Bernie and I had no choice but to overcome his loss and pursued together her path to adulthood. We spent about a year together in the forest before Bernie was able to find enough food to sustain herself and gradually went off into the forest for longer and longer periods before not coming back to camp anymore.

Bernie and Wawang in the forest

From having spent so much time in the forest with the bears, I have learnt to appreciate how they belong to the tropical rainforest, how energetic and inquisitive they are and how they love to play. There was never a dull moment with the bears in the forest, they were active and on the move from dawn to dusk, and their favourite activity besides eating was playing. Besides a few dogs I know who are always happy, I had never seen an animal express so much joy at the simple fact of being alive. Through Bunbun, Bernie and Wawang, I discovered a magnificent expression of life on earth.

Bernie climbing a tree

There is something wrong about depriving any living creature of its freedom, but keeping a sun bear in a cage is something particularly cruel. I am sure that the degree of joy a sun bear feels when living a free life in the forest matches the extent of pain he feels when locked in a cage. Sun bears hate to be locked up, they’ll go crazy from not being able to express their energy. And in Indonesia there are many sun bears locked in cages. These bears have lost their mothers, their freedom and their habitat. They’ve been so deprived of everything that they wouldn’t even be able to survive in the wild if they were given the opportunity.

Bernie with her friend Bagor, a Bornean orangutan

Strangely, sun bears are mostly unheard of by the international public and there is not a single local or international organisation in Indonesia dedicated to rescuing sun bears and caring for them. So I founded my own charity called Sun Bear Outreach, and through this charity I raise funds that I use to improve the welfare of the bears I encounter, individual by individual. I go to the places where sun bears are kept in poor conditions and I construct bigger cages and large forest enclosures, so that the bears can at least feel the earth under their paws, dig, run and climb trees.

The Life is One film documents these early reintroductions and the trials and tribulations that Patrick endures to save these endangered bears.

Find out more about Patrick Rouxel and watch his films on his website.

Explore the Arkive sun bear species profile and learn more about these beautiful animals.

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