Mar 19

Have you ever seen a wildlife film and wondered to yourself, who is the person behind the camera? Enter Rich and Richard Kern – the dynamic wildlife filmmaking father/son duo who capture incredible imagery of Florida’s magnificent wildlife and ecosystems and share it with over 1.5 million students! They are a more-than-worthy team to conclude Arkive’s Conservation Heroes series.

Rich (left) and Richard Kern out in the field.

Rich (left) and Richard Kern out in the field.

If you find Rich and Richard’s story inspiring, then click on the blue button below or at the end of the interview to see Rich and Richard’s “Wish List” of actions that would help them continue sharing their films with the world. Working together, we can support and promote conservation.

Kern wish list button

Can you share the story behind the beginning of Odyssey Earth and how the pieces came together?

Rich: I began as a filmmaker and I showed the films that I produced to travel adventure audiences all over the United States and Canada. In 1977, my wife and I started the non-profit Encounters in Excellence to teach students in the Miami-Dade area about Florida wildlife and ecosystems. This soon became a large series to over 50 schools per year.

Rich Kern and his wife, Judy, founders of Encounters in Excellence

Rich Kern and his wife, Judy, founders of Encounters in Excellence

However, I also wanted to find a way that students could have access to this type of educational material year round. My son, Richard came up with the idea of creating a website for the films he and I had produced. Teachers and students could now navigate this site and explore and discover the different resources available to them for lesson plans which became Odyssey Earth.

Richard: Our typical film presentation series runs from the Fall through early Winter. This past year my dad visited 25 schools and I visited 50 schools. We give 2-3 presentations for each school totaling about 130 presentations each year. We create different presentations for elementary school and then middle school and high school students reaching about 40,000 students each year.

Can you share a filmmaking moment that stands out to you whether it was a connection you made with a species you were filming or a moment of enlightenment about nature?

Rich: I was in Silver Springs, FL filming fish and I was quite focused. I didn’t realize that there was an alligator swimming behind me. I didn’t see it until it was practically in my lap. Once I understood that the alligator was more afraid of me than I was of it then I started following it and filming.

American alligators abound in Florida, USA

Richard: When my dad got home, he started going through the film, and my mother promptly told him that he should buy life insurance.

Have there been ways that you can measure the impact that your work has on students both in Florida and around the world?

Richard: One way that we measure our impact is through questionnaires and evaluations that we hand out to teachers and students.

Rich: The average rating we receive from teachers is a 95% “excellent” for our presentations. I think it also significant that we fill our quotas for teachers and schools that want us to present. We recently made some films that dealt with the food web as well as more specific issues like the rise of sea levels.

Creek snorkling low res

Richard Kern snorkeling and filmmaking in creek

Can you share your typical kit (equipment) list?

Rich: Back in the day, you needed 16mm film equipment and changed your film every 3 minutes.

Richard: With new technology, however it’s changed what you pack. First off you need a backpack to carry all your supplies. Usually we take a fluid head tripod, a small hi-def Canon camcorder, and a digital single lens reflex camera. Getting into specifics though, I always pack a light shotgun microphone, lenses, and an external digital sound recorder. As for essentials in Florida, water to stay hydrated, sunscreen, and mosquito repellent is a must.

Sometimes, a filmmakers kit can be just as interesting to the subject as it is to the filmmakers themselves!

Can you also share your equipment tip list for amateur filmmakers?

Richard: If you already have a handheld camera, then that is a good place to start. I would recommend a fluid head tripod.

Rich: It makes your shot smoother, which makes the film less distracting for the viewer. You can also get a pan-tilt cradle where you can place your camera to get wide angle shots. You also should get a camera with a wi-fi capability which allows you to use it remotely.

What would you advise someone who is starting to look at how to get into wildlife filmmaking?

Rich: Go to college and study biology. Filmmaking you can pick up as you go. As a filmmaker, you have to learn to craft a story. You want to make sure that you get the science right and that you engage your audience. You should also take a journalism course or English course in college, it helps you to effectively create the narrative.

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Rich Kern filming seals early in his career

In your opinion, what is the advantage of visual media compared to other ways of storytelling?

Richard: The written word comes in many different languages that cannot be understood by everyone. Meanwhile, the visual is universal. It’s a universal language. Visual media can be easily digested and seen by everyone.

Finally, what do you find most rewarding in your field of wildlife filmmaking?

Rich: I love it when I capture a rare species behavior. To get it on the screen and get it right the first time is worth a lot of excitement.

Richard: You can look at flora and fauna as puzzle pieces. Seeing how those puzzle pieces work together, finding the relationships is amazing.

 

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The Kerns have been fortunate enough to film a variety of species in incredible global locations

From reading about Heroes to becoming one yourself 

Inspired by Rich and Richard’s story to take action? Please click on the button below to make a pledge today to take an action like sharing their story socially, helping to spread the word further, to donating to their work to educate others about Florida wildlife and ecosystems! Whichever you choose, your pledge to take action matters to the Kerns, to Arkive, and to the incredible species and habitats of Florida.

Take Action!

Kern wish list button

Feb 23

What makes for successful conservation? Sometimes, it takes a Hero.

For the past 11 years, Arkive has strived to build an unparalleled collection of the world’s best images and films of wildlife and habitats around the globe. Currently, Arkive shares the story of over 16,000 species with over 100,000 stunning photographs and film clips from our generous media contributors such as the BBC, Disney, Smithsonian Institute and over 6,000 enormously talented independent filmmakers and photographers. But there is another side of conservation that has yet to have its story told on Arkive. Our team is privileged to work with inspiring scientists, researchers, educators, and conservationists around the globe who have dedicated their lives to the conservation of nature both on a local and global scale. From creative and powerful cheetah conservation practices to independent filmmakers who trudge the Everglades on the weekends to capture rare and powerful footage, there are hundreds (maybe even thousands!) of conservation stories to share from the Heroes at the frontlines who are accomplishing measurable advances for conservation.

From reading about Heroes to becoming one yourself

Arkive is proud to present the official launch of the Arkive Conservation Heroes series. Over the next four weeks, we will feature four Heroes making incredible strides for species and habitats in their part of the world. Even more, each story in the Arkive Conservation Heroes series ends with a “wish list” of actual actions you, yes you, can take or pledge to take to support each Hero. We are asking each reader to pledge to at least one wish list action which range from sharing a Heroes story socially to help spread the word further to donating or even planning to volunteer time with the hero him or herself! The first Arkive Conservation Heroes series will launch this week with the following incredible line-up:

Dr. Laurie Marker

Dr. Laurie Marker and CCF Resident Cheetahs Resize

 (Photo courtesy of CCF)

Dr. Laurie Marker is the founder and executive director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF) dedicated to saving the cheetah in the wild. Dr. Marker helped to develop the US and international captive cheetah breeding program. Her past work includes collaborating with the National Zoo and National Cancer Institute, to help identify the cheetah’s lack of genetic variation : Published February 26, 2015

Dr. Alessandro Catenazzi

Ale 4

Dr. Alessandro Catenazzi is an assistant professor at the University of Southern Illinois-Carbondale in the zoology department who, along with his team, recently discovered a new species of water frog, Telmatobius ventriflavum, in central Peru! His current research focuses on the systematics and conservation of Neotropical amphibians and reptiles, and the ecological dimensions of biodiversity: Published March 5, 2015

Subir Chowfin

subir chowfin (1) Subir Chowfin , is a wildlife researcher and a local hero for the region of Uttarakhand. He and his mother Christine Margaret Chowfin worked to forever protect 450 hectares of local forest land on the Gadoli and Manda Khal Fee Simple Estates in India that is home to as many as 78 species of flowering plants, birds, and mammals including leopards. The next step for Subir and his mother is to set up a Field Centre for Ecology and Habitat Restoration on these estates: Published March 12, 2015

Rich & Richard Kern

Kerns promo portrait Resize

Dynamic father/son duo, Rich & Richard Kern, are co-founders of Odyssey Earth producing stunning films of Florida wildlife and ecosystems. Their goal? To bring the wild of the Florida wilderness to school children to hopefully inspire the next generation of conservationists in the sunshine state: Published March 19, 2015

The Arkive Team is incredibly excited to bring these stories to you and even more excited to see how our incredible community of over 1 million monthly Arkive visitors can come together to take real action in support of these Heroes. To start, help  support these amazing individuals by sharing this blog via Facebook or Twitter and follow #ArkConservationHeroes to stay up-to-date!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA  

Oct 26
Photo of Florida perforate reindeer lichen on sand

Florida perforate reindeer lichen (Cladonia perforata)

Species: Florida perforate reindeer lichen (Cladonia perforata)

Status: Endangered (EN)

Interesting Fact: The Florida perforate reindeer lichen is not known to reproduce sexually, instead spreading vegetatively when broken-off pieces of the lichen re-grow.

More information:

As its name suggests, the Florida perforate reindeer lichen is found only in Florida in the United States, where it occurs in three separate regions, each with a number of highly fragmented populations. Like other lichens, this species consists of two different organisms, a fungus and an alga, living in a close symbiotic relationship. The Florida perforate reindeer lichen grows in a complex branching pattern, with each branch measuring around four to six centimetres in length. The branches are smooth and yellowish- or greyish-green, and have conspicuous holes at the base. This species grows slowly, only branching once a year. The Florida perforate reindeer lichen grows on high sand dune ridges among Florida rosemary scrub, where it typically occurs in open patches of sand between the shrubs.

One of the main threats to the Florida perforate reindeer lichen is habitat loss due to development and land conversion. This species is also vulnerable to disturbances caused by fires and hurricanes, and can be trampled by people and by vehicles using sand dunes for recreation. In 1993, the Florida perforate reindeer lichen became the first lichen species to be placed on the U.S. Endangered Species List, meaning that all federal landowners with populations of this species are responsible for protecting and conserving it. In addition, Florida has an active conservation programme which monitors and conserves species such as this by acquiring and managing land. Several of this lichen’s populations are protected, and the species has been reintroduced to some locations. Further measures are needed to ensure that the Florida perforate reindeer lichen and its habitat are protected from trampling and unsuitable fire regimes.

 

Find out more about conservation in Florida at The Nature Conservancy – Florida and the Conservation Trust for Florida.

See more images of the Florida perforate reindeer lichen on ARKive.

Liz Shaw, ARKive Text Author

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