Apr 20

With Easter just a hop, skip and a jump away, we thought we’d crack into the ARKive coll-egg-tion and have a scramble around to eggs-tract some egg-citing eggs to eggs-hibit in our blog. Along the way, we’ve also learned about the eggs-istence of some rather eggs-centric egg-laying and guarding habits, and we hope you’re as eggs-tatic about our finds as we are!

Gooseberry fool?

Peacock butterfly egg image

Peacock butterfly eggs look a lot like gooseberries!

While you might be forgiven for being fooled into thinking that these green globules are plump and juicy gooseberries, they are, in fact, peacock butterfly eggs. The eggs of this species are laid in groups under nettles, usually in May, and hatch two weeks later.

Sunny-side up? Over-easy? Well-done?

Emu egg image

Emu eggs come in various shades of greenish-black

However you like your eggs, there’s no denying that these ones look as though they’ve been char-grilled in their shells! But fear not, these emu eggs are supposed to look like this; they come in various shades of greenish-black and are the size of a small grapefruit. The male emu is an eggs-traordinary guardian, taking sole responsibility for incubating the eggs over the course of two months while the female wanders off to potentially find another mate, and protecting the chicks against predators for several months once they’ve hatched.

100 kids and counting…

Green turtle egg image

Green turtles can lay an impressive number of eggs per nesting season

In the UK, having more than about four siblings would constitute being part of a pretty large and impressive family, but in the world of marine turtles, this is a mere drop in the ocean. Female green turtles produce between 100 and 150 ping-pong-ball-like eggs per clutch, and can lay up to nine separate clutches per breeding season. While this may seem rather a lot, marine turtles don’t guard their nests or look after their young, and with the threat of land- and ocean-dwelling predators, the survival rate of hatchlings is very low.

High-flying hunger games…

Bald eagle egg image

Bald eagle nests are some of the largest of any bird species

Bald eagle nests, made with sticks and lined with moss, grass, seaweed and other vegetation, are some of the largest of any bird species, sometimes reaching several metres in width. These enormous nests presumably provide a comfy and snug environment for the eggs during the 35-day incubation period, yet things can soon turn ugly. By being bigger and louder, the first-born chick is often afforded more parental attention and food, and will even occasionally kill its younger siblings.

Treasures of the deep

California horn shark egg image

Shark eggs, such as this California horn shark egg, are often referred to as ‘mermaid’s purses’

A mermaid’s purse might well sound like something a sea-dwelling siren would keep her money and credit cards in, but a pilfering pickpocket could get a nasty surprise if they were to try to purloin this particular purse as it is actually a shark egg-case! Mermaid’s purses vary greatly in shape, size and colour, depending on the shark species in question.

Eggs-panding eggs


Common frog egg image

Common frog eggs are coated in a jelly-like substance

Frog egg masses, often referred to as frogspawn, tend to look rather like a gruesome collection of eyeballs. The female common frog releases between 1,000 and 2,000 eggs at a time, which are covered in a jelly-like coating. This coating expands when it comes into contact with water, providing protection for the tadpoles growing within.

Egg pasta


Sea lemon egg image

Pasta del mar – sea lemons produce somewhat pasta-like egg masses

What may look like a delectable strand of abandoned tagliatelle cast into the depths of the ocean is, in actual fact, a mass of sea lemon eggs. A common sea slug around Britain’s shores, the sea lemon produces thousands of eggs at a time which form a long, coiled, ribbon-like mass. These egg masses are produced in the spring and are attached to rocks, so if you take an Easter weekend dip in the sea and find such a structure, we would advise leaving it well alone and not adding it to your carbonara!

Ha-bee Easter!


Honey bee egg image

Honey bee egg

A supplier of sugary goodness and a harbinger of spring to many, the honey bee lays its eggs from March to October. Honey bee colonies have a complex structure, formed of the queen, workers and drones, all of which serve different functions. Worker bees have a variety of roles within the colony, with some being tasked with feeding the developing larvae which emerge from the eggs around three days after they are laid.

Eggshellent parenting


King penguin egg image

King penguins incubate their egg on their feet

King penguins appear to take parenting very seriously, with each pair keeping a close eye on their precious egg. Incubation is shared by the male and female and is split into two- or three-week cycles, and parental duties remain shared once the chick has hatched. It’s a good job that king penguins don’t let their eggs out of their sight, otherwise they may not believe the chick belonged to them…the chick looks so different to the adult that they were first described as two completely different species!

Eggs-treme monotreme

Short-beaked echidna egg

A short-beaked echidna egg

While the majority of mammals give birth to live young, there are some eggs-treme mammalian species that lay eggs! These eggs-tra special critters are known as monotremes, and the short-beaked echidna is one of them. The echidna’s leathery egg is laid into a pouch on the female’s abdomen, where it is incubated for about ten days before it hatches. The young echidna, or ‘puggle’, remains there until it is 45 to 55 days old.

We hope you’ve enjoyed these eggs-amples of awesome eggs, and that you all have a wonderful Easter weekend!

Kathryn Pintus, ARKive Text Author

Apr 19

Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis)

Species: Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis)

Status: Critically Endangered (CR)

Interesting Fact: The Vancouver Island marmot is thought to be one of the rarest mammals in North America, with a wild population of fewer than 100 individuals.

More information: The endemic Vancouver Island marmot is a stocky rodent that has a chestnut-brown pelage with a cream-coloured area around its nose and mouth. As with all marmots, the Vancouver Island marmot lives in family groups that usually contain one male, two females and the juveniles and young produced that year. The families occupy complex underground burrow systems in which they hibernate between the end of September and early May, surviving by using up the fat reserves that are built up throughout the summer.

Logging activities and weather fluctuations within the habitat of the Vancouver Island marmot are thought to have caused population declines. Additionally, the local deer population has recently increased and their presence is known to increase the amount of predators in an area which may also take Vancouver Island marmots.

The Vancouver Island marmot is legally protected through its listing on the British Columbia Wildlife Act. A recovery plan was established in 1988 in an attempt to save this species from the brink of extinction, and a captive breeding programme is now in place, with reintroductions of captive-bred individuals planned for the future.

See images of the Vancouver Island marmot on ARKive

Find out more about Vancouver Island and other islands of the North Pacific

Find out more about other marmot species

Hannah Mulvany, ARKive Content and Outreach Officer

Apr 12
Doria's tree kangaroo image

Doria’s tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus dorianus)

Species: Doria’s tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus dorianus)

Status: Vulnerable (VU)

Interesting Fact: Doria’s tree kangaroo is the heaviest tree-dwelling marsupial in the world, weighing as much as 20 kilograms, and is capable of jumping down to the ground from a height of up to 18 metres without injury.

Despite its appearance and arboreal nature, Doria’s tree kangaroo is closely related to the well-known ground kangaroos that can be seen across Australian plains, and has similar strongly developed hindquarters and a long, well-furred tail. Unlike its Australian relatives, Doria’s tree kangaroo is endemic to the island of New Guinea, where it is found in the central highlands. This species has fairly long fur, which interestingly grows in a reverse direction on the back and neck. This is presumably to stop water running down its face, as this marsupial tends to sit with its head lower than its shoulders.

While Doria’s tree kangaroo is thought to still be common in some areas of its range, intense and consistent hunting pressure for its meat has led to the local extinction of many populations of this species. In the past, hunting of this prized game species by local people may have been sustainable, but advances in the development of hunting equipment, combined with a rising human population, has led to an increase in hunting. Habitat loss and degradation of forested areas as a result of exploitation for timber poses an additional threat to Doria’s tree kangaroo.

Doria’s tree kangaroo is legally protected in the Indonesian part of New Guinea. However, this is not yet the case in Papua New Guinea, and the protection of vital forest habitat in this region has been recommended to ensure the future survival of this intriguing marsupial. In addition, measures to control or restrict traditional hunting have been suggested as key factors in the conservation of this threatened species.

See images and videos of Doria’s tree kangaroo on ARKive.

Find out more about New Guinea and other South Pacific islands.

Kathryn Pintus, ARKive Content and Outreach Officer

Feb 5

The Winter Olympics are fast approaching. The anticipation and excitement are growing. The spectators, such as this Arctic ground squirrel, are ready to appreciate the spectacular scenery, but it is important to understand the different events properly in order to fully enjoy them. Read on to learn about the natural stars of the Winter Olympics.

Ski and snowboard cross are fast-paced, adrenaline-fuelled races over difficult sculpted terrain. These reindeer make it look like a piece of cake. Reindeer are highly sociable, and can form regional herds of 50,000 to 500,000 individuals!

Skeleton is an individual sport in which the competitor flies down a track of ice at speeds of up to 225 kilometres per hour! It looks as though this polar bear is in the correct position, but he won’t get very far without his sled.

Slopestyle skiing or snowboarding is a creative competition that involves lots of tricks and flips. The professionals could take some tips from this majestic humpback whale.

Alpine skiing is a thrilling test of speed, with the fastest down the hill taking the crown. This muskox is an unlikely looking speed demon, able to reach speeds of up to 60 kilometres per hour!

Cross-country skiing is a test of endurance over a long and challenging course. These macaroni penguins have a perfect technique.

Figure skating requires a high level of artistic flair, as well as impeccable balance and a deep bond with your skating partner, nicely demonstrated by these wandering albatrosses. These huge birds can live for over 50 years, and mate for life.

Bobsleigh requires a team of four highly athletic and able individuals. Look no further than these agile Adélie penguins that are able dive to depths of 175 metres for food.

We hope you are looking forward to appreciating the wild, natural beauty and the sporting achievements of the Winter Olympics.

Phoebe Shaw Stewart, ARKive Text Author

Jan 29

Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, is an important traditional Chinese holiday, packed full of flamboyant family festivities, age-old traditions and cultural charm. In China, New Year celebrations begin on the 23rd day of the 12th lunar month, with each New Year being represented by a different animal in the Chinese zodiac or ‘Shēngxiào’. On the 31st January, we enter the Year of the Horse, the seventh sign in the Chinese zodiac, and to celebrate this occasion we have delved into the ARKive vault to bring you fabulous facts about all things equine!


Asiatic wild ass image

According to Chinese astrology, each sign of the zodiac can be associated with specific personality traits. People born in the Year of the Horse love to be in a crowd, enjoying social occasions such as concerts, theatre visits and sporting matches. and it seems these Asiatic wild asses are no different! Interestingly, the social structure of this species appears to differ across its range, with some populations forming harems and others adopting territory-based social groups.

Several species with stripes…

Plains zebra image

As well as being one of the most distinctive equids, the plains zebra is also the most widespread and abundant. But did you know that there are two other species of zebra, both of which are considered to be threatened? The mountain zebra can be distinguished from its relatives by the stripes on its neck and torso which are thin and relatively close together, while Grevy’s zebra is the largest of the equids and has a conspicuous black stripe running along its back. With their fashionable stripes and funky manes, zebras are true style icons for the image-conscious folk born under the sign of the Horse.

Hot-headed horses

Przewalski's horse image

Two of the more negative personality traits associated with those born in the Year of the Horse are impatience and hot-headedness, as demonstrated here in this aggressive encounter between to Przewalski’s horse stallions. In the wild, Przewalski’s horse occurs in family groups led by a dominant stallion which physically defends its herd should a male from a bachelor group try and take over.

Equine explorers

Kiang image

People born in the Year of the Horse love to travel, as does the kiang which roams the vast open terrain of China, India, Nepal and Pakistan. This species can be found in Alpine meadows, steppes and on plains, foraging for grasses and sedges, and occurs at impressive elevations of up to 5,430 metres.

Energetic equids

African wild ass image

Those born under the sign of the Horse tend to be active, energetic and athletic, and are always on the move, much like this African wild ass. Horse-folk tend to pick up new skills quickly, and the African wild ass has a special skill of its own – it is capable of surviving water loss of up to 30% of its body weight, and of drinking enough water to replace it in under 5 minutes. Impressive!

Ass-like attributes

Kiang image

Despite sometimes being considered arrogant and selfish, people born in the Year of the Horse are also creative, positive and open-minded, as well as being witty (although this kiang appears to find himself funnier than his herd-mates do!), so befriend a Horse, embrace their free-spiritedness, and celebrate Chinese New Year in style!

Kathryn Pintus, ARKive Content and Outreach Officer


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