Apr 12
Doria's tree kangaroo image

Doria’s tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus dorianus)

Species: Doria’s tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus dorianus)

Status: Vulnerable (VU)

Interesting Fact: Doria’s tree kangaroo is the heaviest tree-dwelling marsupial in the world, weighing as much as 20 kilograms, and is capable of jumping down to the ground from a height of up to 18 metres without injury.

Despite its appearance and arboreal nature, Doria’s tree kangaroo is closely related to the well-known ground kangaroos that can be seen across Australian plains, and has similar strongly developed hindquarters and a long, well-furred tail. Unlike its Australian relatives, Doria’s tree kangaroo is endemic to the island of New Guinea, where it is found in the central highlands. This species has fairly long fur, which interestingly grows in a reverse direction on the back and neck. This is presumably to stop water running down its face, as this marsupial tends to sit with its head lower than its shoulders.

While Doria’s tree kangaroo is thought to still be common in some areas of its range, intense and consistent hunting pressure for its meat has led to the local extinction of many populations of this species. In the past, hunting of this prized game species by local people may have been sustainable, but advances in the development of hunting equipment, combined with a rising human population, has led to an increase in hunting. Habitat loss and degradation of forested areas as a result of exploitation for timber poses an additional threat to Doria’s tree kangaroo.

Doria’s tree kangaroo is legally protected in the Indonesian part of New Guinea. However, this is not yet the case in Papua New Guinea, and the protection of vital forest habitat in this region has been recommended to ensure the future survival of this intriguing marsupial. In addition, measures to control or restrict traditional hunting have been suggested as key factors in the conservation of this threatened species.

See images and videos of Doria’s tree kangaroo on ARKive.

Find out more about New Guinea and other South Pacific islands.

Kathryn Pintus, ARKive Content and Outreach Officer

Feb 5

The Winter Olympics are fast approaching. The anticipation and excitement are growing. The spectators, such as this Arctic ground squirrel, are ready to appreciate the spectacular scenery, but it is important to understand the different events properly in order to fully enjoy them. Read on to learn about the natural stars of the Winter Olympics.

Ski and snowboard cross are fast-paced, adrenaline-fuelled races over difficult sculpted terrain. These reindeer make it look like a piece of cake. Reindeer are highly sociable, and can form regional herds of 50,000 to 500,000 individuals!

Skeleton is an individual sport in which the competitor flies down a track of ice at speeds of up to 225 kilometres per hour! It looks as though this polar bear is in the correct position, but he won’t get very far without his sled.

Slopestyle skiing or snowboarding is a creative competition that involves lots of tricks and flips. The professionals could take some tips from this majestic humpback whale.

Alpine skiing is a thrilling test of speed, with the fastest down the hill taking the crown. This muskox is an unlikely looking speed demon, able to reach speeds of up to 60 kilometres per hour!

Cross-country skiing is a test of endurance over a long and challenging course. These macaroni penguins have a perfect technique.

Figure skating requires a high level of artistic flair, as well as impeccable balance and a deep bond with your skating partner, nicely demonstrated by these wandering albatrosses. These huge birds can live for over 50 years, and mate for life.

Bobsleigh requires a team of four highly athletic and able individuals. Look no further than these agile Adélie penguins that are able dive to depths of 175 metres for food.

We hope you are looking forward to appreciating the wild, natural beauty and the sporting achievements of the Winter Olympics.

Phoebe Shaw Stewart, ARKive Text Author

Jan 29

Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, is an important traditional Chinese holiday, packed full of flamboyant family festivities, age-old traditions and cultural charm. In China, New Year celebrations begin on the 23rd day of the 12th lunar month, with each New Year being represented by a different animal in the Chinese zodiac or ‘Shēngxiào’. On the 31st January, we enter the Year of the Horse, the seventh sign in the Chinese zodiac, and to celebrate this occasion we have delved into the ARKive vault to bring you fabulous facts about all things equine!

Ass-ociations

Asiatic wild ass image

According to Chinese astrology, each sign of the zodiac can be associated with specific personality traits. People born in the Year of the Horse love to be in a crowd, enjoying social occasions such as concerts, theatre visits and sporting matches. and it seems these Asiatic wild asses are no different! Interestingly, the social structure of this species appears to differ across its range, with some populations forming harems and others adopting territory-based social groups.

Several species with stripes…

Plains zebra image

As well as being one of the most distinctive equids, the plains zebra is also the most widespread and abundant. But did you know that there are two other species of zebra, both of which are considered to be threatened? The mountain zebra can be distinguished from its relatives by the stripes on its neck and torso which are thin and relatively close together, while Grevy’s zebra is the largest of the equids and has a conspicuous black stripe running along its back. With their fashionable stripes and funky manes, zebras are true style icons for the image-conscious folk born under the sign of the Horse.

Hot-headed horses

Przewalski's horse image

Two of the more negative personality traits associated with those born in the Year of the Horse are impatience and hot-headedness, as demonstrated here in this aggressive encounter between to Przewalski’s horse stallions. In the wild, Przewalski’s horse occurs in family groups led by a dominant stallion which physically defends its herd should a male from a bachelor group try and take over.

Equine explorers

Kiang image

People born in the Year of the Horse love to travel, as does the kiang which roams the vast open terrain of China, India, Nepal and Pakistan. This species can be found in Alpine meadows, steppes and on plains, foraging for grasses and sedges, and occurs at impressive elevations of up to 5,430 metres.

Energetic equids

African wild ass image

Those born under the sign of the Horse tend to be active, energetic and athletic, and are always on the move, much like this African wild ass. Horse-folk tend to pick up new skills quickly, and the African wild ass has a special skill of its own – it is capable of surviving water loss of up to 30% of its body weight, and of drinking enough water to replace it in under 5 minutes. Impressive!

Ass-like attributes

Kiang image

Despite sometimes being considered arrogant and selfish, people born in the Year of the Horse are also creative, positive and open-minded, as well as being witty (although this kiang appears to find himself funnier than his herd-mates do!), so befriend a Horse, embrace their free-spiritedness, and celebrate Chinese New Year in style!

Kathryn Pintus, ARKive Content and Outreach Officer

Jan 25

January 25th marks the Birthday of Robert Burns (1759-1796), an iconic Scottish figure and one of the world’s most famous poets.

Admired for his poems, love songs and cheeky character, Robert Burns created works which are still well known today, such as Auld Lang Syne, one of the most popular songs in the English language.

Since Burns’ early death over 200 years ago, people have gathered together every year to commemorate his life and work. Burns Night is one of the most celebrated events in Scottish culture, and the occasion is recognised all over the world. Typically, a supper is held on or around January 25th, which includes a traditional Scottish meal, Scotch whisky, music, speeches and recitation of Robert Burns’ work.

In memory of Robert Burns, we thought we’d delve into the ARKive collection and celebrate all things Scottish!

Spear thistle

Spear thistle image

Spear thistle in flower

Legend has it the Scottish army were alerted to the onset of Viking intruders after one of them stood on a thistle barefooted and cried out in pain. The thistle has been the national emblem of Scotland for centuries, and the earliest record of it being used as a royal symbol is on coins issued by James III in 1470.

Although the actual species of thistle is disputed, some believe that the spear thistle is most likely to be the true ‘Scotch thistle’, as it is abundant and native to Scotland.

Red deer

Red deer image

Red deer stag roaring during rut

Britain’s largest land mammal, the red deer is widespread throughout Scotland, with an estimated population of 300,000. In winter, the red deer tend to move from the hills and remote glens to lower areas with shelter and a more abundant food supply. In winter the coat is brown or grey, but it changes to a reddish-brown in the summer.

Puffin

Puffin image

Puffin

In April, puffins begin arriving around the Scottish coast to breed. Almost one million puffins choose to breed in Scotland, and most are concentrated in just a few colonies in the north and west. Puffins nest in burrows or in rocky crevices, and normally lay a single egg in May.

The best time to see puffins in Scotland is in mid-July, when the adults are busy collecting sand eels to feed the pufflings.

Scottish wildcat

Scottish wildcat image

Scottish wildcat resting in woodland

It is thought that fewer than 400 ‘genetically pure’ wildcats remain in Scotland today. This is because wildcats breed with domestic cats, creating hybrids which are diluting the population.

The wildcat is solitary and usually hunts at night. It catches rabbits, hares, voles and mice, but it may also feed on small birds, frogs and even insects.

Osprey

Osprey image

Osprey carrying a fish

Ospreys arrive in Scotland to breed in late April to early May after an amazing journey from western Africa, which takes about 20 flying days. There are around 200 breeding osprey pairs in Scotland, and the best places to see them include Loch Garten and Loch of the Lowes.

Ospreys return to their wintering grounds in West Africa in late August to mid-September. If you can’t make it to Scotland this summer, why not watch this fantastic osprey video - it’s the most popular one on ARKive!

Scots pine

Scots pine image

Scots pine forest

The Scots pine is native to Scotland and is a dominant tree in the Caledonian Forest, which is also made up of birch, aspen, rowan, oak and juniper. Although pinewood forests were once spread over most of the Highlands, only 1% of the original forest remains, split into smaller, fragmented pockets.

The oldest scientifically dated Scots pine in Scotland is Glen Loyne, which was estimated to be 550 years old in the late 1990s.

Bottlenose dolphin

Bottlenose dolphin image

Bottlenose dolphins breaching

Bottlenose dolphins inhabit the waters around the Scottish coast throughout the year, but they are easiest to spot during the spring and summer. The Moray Firth is home to the most northerly resident bottlenose dolphin population in the world, and is one of the best places to watch dolphins in Scotland.

Compared to bottlenose dolphins in warmer climates, such as Florida, the Moray Firth dolphins are larger and fatter to insulate them from the colder water.

Eurasian beaver

Eurasian beaver image

Eurasian beaver feeding

Between May 2009 and September 2010, 16 Eurasian beavers were released into the wild in Knapdale Forest, Mid-Argyll, as part of a monitored trial. The first beaver kit (named Barney) was born in spring 2010, making him the first to be born in the wild in Scotland for over 400 years!

At the end of the trial, decisions will be made about the future of beavers in Knapdale Forest and other possible reintroduction sites in Scotland.

You can see some videos of the introduced beavers on the Scottish Beaver Trial blog.

Let us know if your favourite Scottish species is missing from our blog! How are you planning to celebrate Burns Night?

ARKive Media Team

Jan 2

For those of you looking to try a new form of exercise in the New Year to tone up and get fit, why not follow the example of these animal athletes and take up yoga? By working through a variety of postures and mastering your breathing, you too could be as strong and limber as the creatures below – check out some of their efforts and get inspired!

Downward dog…

Cape fox image

This Cape fox, the smallest and only ‘true fox’ in southern Africa, appears to have mastered one of yoga’s most recognisable postures – the downward dog. In fact, he looks like he’s pretty much doing it in his sleep…!

 

…or should it be downward cat?!

Wildcat image

Not to be outdone by a canine, this wildcat is showing off its skill in a bid to get the name of the posture changed to give it a more feline feel! This species is the wild ancestor of the domestic cat, and can weigh up to eight kilos.

 

Bird-like balance

White-rumped sandpiper image

A big part of practising yoga is learning to be centred and balanced, as demonstrated by this white-rumped sandpiper. We’re not sure what this particular posture is called, but it certainly seems popular in the bird world!

 

Sun Salutation

New England crayfish

A sun salutation is formed of a sequence of postures, including downward dog and cobra. One particular pose held at the beginning and end of the sun salutation sequence consists of extending the arms over the head and raising the face towards the sky, as demonstrated beautifully by this colourful New England crayfish.

 

Locust pose

Northern elephant seal image

The great thing about yoga is that it can be practised virtually anywhere – this northern elephant seal has decided to bond with nature and try the locust pose out on the beach. Although generally not particularly agile on land, the northern elephant seal has long, webbed feet which provide great propulsion to effectively glide through the water.

 

Warrior III?!

Red ruffed lemur image

Despite having a tail which can reach up to 62 centimetres in length, which is longer than its body and could potentially get in the way, this red ruffed lemur has not been put off trying yoga. Here we can see it preparing to go into full Warrior III pose, showing some reasonable leg extension.

 

Handstand

Orange-winged dropwing image

More advanced yoga practitioners can master the art of the handstand, which requires core strength and a lot of concentration. This orange-winged dropwing is providing us with a good example of a handstand, but does the use of all six legs not count as cheating?!

 

Flexible and fossorial

Naked mole rat image

This naked mole rat is trying what is known as the full boat pose during its subterranean yoga session. Look at that concentration! As naked mole rats are not able to control their body temperature internally like other mammals, this guy will have to retreat to cooler parts of its burrow if it gets too hot.

 

Aquatic yoga

Manatee image

Bikram yoga, practised in a hot, steamy environment, has been all the rage recently, but this manatee has taken it a step further and has developed aquatic yoga. Here we can see a beautiful example of a tail-stand! If you don’t like cold water, not to fear – manatees ideally require water above 20 degrees Celsius to survive, so these sessions are bound to be nice and warm!

 

Lotus

Verreaux's sifaka image

This Verreaux’s sifaka is doing its own version of the lotus pose – this particular individual is clearly taking a break from leaping gracefully along the floor of its forest home, an action for which it is well known.

 

Relax

Rivera red-belly toad imageHoney bee image

 

After a long, hard yoga session, there’s nothing better than taking a moment to relax in child’s pose, just like this Rivera red-belly toad and honey bee.

 

Namaste!

 

Kathryn Pintus, ARKive Content and Outreach Officer

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