Jun 15

If you had to take a guess at how many wildlife photos are in the ARKive collection at this moment, what would you guess? 1000? 10,000? Actually, the ARKive collection has put a face to 15,500+ species from around the world with over 94,000 images!

Today is Nature Photography Day so we thought it was the perfect time to share the top 10 most viewed wildlife photos on ARKive starting with …

#10

Photo of green anaconda

This picture of a 12 foot long green anaconda has brought loads of visitors to ARKive. Since the species holds the title for largest snake in the world, we’re thinking that might have something to do with its popularity.

#9

Photo of bald eagle

We’re not surprised to see this national emblem of the United States in the top 10 rankings. An interesting fact about the species you may not know is that bald eagles are thought to be monogamous meaning they pair for life.

#8

Photo of giant panda

While the bald eagle is synonymous with the USA, the giant panda is certainly synonymous with China. Perhaps this picture is so popular because it depicts the species doing what it does best … eating loads of bamboo. How much does it eat exactly? Up to 18 kg or 40 lbs of bamboo a day!

#7

Photo of lion

We think we see a theme emerging here with some of the world’s largest species dominating the list! One of the largest big cats in the world, lions can take down prey many times bigger than themselves. This particular lion is using a termite mound as a prime vantage point for a future meal.

#6

Photo of tiger

Coming in a very close 2nd in our World’s Favorite Species campaign last month, the tiger is arguably one of the most popular cat species in the world and also the only cat with stripes. Their stripes are so unique that each tiger has its own set of stripes that identifies them much like a fingerprint!

#5

Photo of cheetah

Are you surprised to see yet another cat species on the list? We’re not! Cheetahs are always crowd favorites and an action shot like this gives a glimpse into how powerful this species can be.

#4

Photo of king cobra

The longest of the world’s snakes, the king cobra is also highly venomous and, instead of hissing when danger approaches, it will emit a low, distinctive growl. It’s encouraging that this picture is so popular since this snake is being rescued from a coffee plantation where it would have otherwise been destroyed by plantation workers.

#3

Photo of polar bear

The largest living land carnivore, the polar bear is one of the best known species in the world and another top species in our World’s Favorite Species campaign. When standing on its two rear legs, the males of the species would tower nearly any living human at up to 2.6 meters or 8.5 ft in height!

#2

Photo of orca

We’re finally diving into the ocean on this list with the most widespread mammal in the world (after humans), the orca. This shot of an orca surfacing shows off the signature dorsal, or top, fin of the species beautifully.

And now, for the most viewed wildlife image on ARKive …

#1

Photo of great white shark

This shot of the tremendous great white shark tops our list of most viewed wildlife images on ARKive. As such a fascinating species in so many ways, it’s hard to pinpoint what exactly makes this species so popular. Its powerful, stream-lined body, ability to sense electric fields with its snout, unique capability to give birth to live young and dominating status as the top predator of the marine food chain may all be factors in making this image the most popular.

What do you think? Would this picture be your #1 most-viewed choice? If you had to pick one favorite picture out of all 94,000 on ARKive, could you? Have a look through ARKive and share your favorites in the comments below!

Liana Vitali, ARKive Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

About

RSS feedArkive.org is the place for films, photos and facts about endangered species. Subscribe to our blog today to keep up to date!

Email updates

Sign up to receive a regular email digest of Arkive blog posts.
Preferred frequency:

Arkive twitter

Twitter: ARKive