Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Blue whales are the largest animals ever known to have lived on Earth, growing to lengths of up to nearly 30m – that’s the length of two double decker buses!

2) Everything about this whale is huge apart from its diet of tiny krill, which it eats up to 40 million of every day.

3) A blue whale’s tongue alone can weigh as much as an elephant – the world’s largest land mammal

4) A blue whale’s heart is so huge, around the size of a car, its beat can be detected from over three kilometres away.

5) The blood vessels of blue whales are so wide you could swim through them, but we don’t recommend trying it.

6) Even the babies are massive, being born at lengths of up to 6m and weighing nearly 4,000kg!

7) Baby blue whales put any bodybuilder to shame, gaining up to 90kg a day until they reach a pretty sizeable 15m in length. Their growth rate is one of the fastest in the animal world. #Hulk

8) Blue whales belong to the ‘baleen’ whale family, meaning instead of teeth they have baleen, a fibrous material that looks a bit like the head of a sweeping brush, used to filter their food as they swim.

9) To communicate with each other, blue whales make a series of super-loud vocal sounds. Their calls are one of the loudest of any creature on the planet, audible to other blue whales up to 500 miles away!

10) Despite being hunted to near extinction, with only 1% of their population remaining, blue whales have started to make a comeback and numbers are the highest they’ve been in decades.

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) A crab’s shell acts similarly to our skeleton is but located on the outside of its body, acting as a suit of armour to protect it from predators.

2) Most crabs have evolved flat bodies, helping them to squeeze into very narrow crevices.


3) The largest crab in the world is the giant Japanese spider crab, which can measure up to 4m across! That’s one mighty big Krabby Patty!

4) Pea crabs are the smallest of all crabs, and guess what?! They are about the size of a pea.

5) The boxer crab of Hawaii carries a pair of stinging anemones in its claws as protection – feisty! Although they actually look more like a cheerleader than a boxer.

6) Crabs live in more different habitats than any other sea animal, found almost everywhere in the ocean from smoking volcanic vents thousands of feet under the sea, to underneath the freezing ice of Antarctica.


7) A crab may lose a claw or leg in a fight, but in time, the claw or leg grows back. That’s ‘handy’!

8) A crab’s shell does not grow or stretch. So when it gets bigger, a crack forms along the shell and then the crab backs out of it. The crab then has to wait for its new, exposed outer surface to harden.

9) Bromeliad crab mothers are so caring, they place old snail shells in the water around their babies to boost their calcium uptake so that they develop super strong shells!

10) If a male Australian fiddler crab’s burrow is being invaded by an intruder, his neighbour will leave his own burrow to help fight off the intruder. Everybody needs good neighbours!

 

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species, sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Outside of its natural range, the lionfish is a very invasive species with none or very few natural predators.

2) The lionfish has an array of up to 18 needle-like dorsal fins filled with venom, used to ward off would-be predators.

3) It is an ambush hunter and relies on camouflage and lightning-fast reflexes to capture its prey, which are mainly fish and shrimp.

4) Lionfish will occasionally spread out their fins and herd small prey fish into confined spaces, almost like a sheepdog herding sheep, which makes it much easier to catch them.

5) As they are so invasive in non-native areas and a plague coral reefs, SCUBA divers and chefs are introducing lionfish to restaurant menus across the Americas, in the hope we can eat our way to conservation! Apparently they’re delicious, but mind the spines!

6) A single female can release 30,000 eggs every 4 days in the right conditions -that’s 2 million eggs per year!

7) On heavily invaded sites, lionfish have reduced native fish populations by up to 90%.

8) A lionfish’s stomach can expand up to 30 times its normal volume. An expensive dinner guest!

9) The largest recorded lionfish to date measured nearly 50cm in length.

10) Lionfish have been visually confirmed at a depth of 305m (1000ft), showing that they’re not too fussy where they live so long as there’s a meal to be had!

Jun 5

Here at Wildscreen we’re Crowdfunding to bring the ocean to our hometown (Bristol, UK) to raise awareness about our ocean and the amazing creatures that call it home. We need your help!

Help us!

We need our supporters to help us submerge Bristol into a wild and watery wonderland this October. From sculptures to street art, photography exhibitions to pedal-powered cinemas, Wildscreen’s Witness the Wild (WTW) festival will see Bristol submerged in nature in unexpected places across the city, no flippers required. The programme of events will be completely free-to-attend and will be distributed across the city with the aim of reaching as many communities as possible – absolutely anyone can attend!

We’ll bring together local community groups, artists, scientists, wildlife filmmakers and photographers to transform two concrete roundabouts into oceanic sanctuaries, giving thousands of people the opportunity to dive beneath the waves and explore the ocean depths for themselves and discover how we can all do little things to help protect it.

WTW will engage local communities and businesses with our throwaway culture and its impacts on our ocean, bringing them together with amazing artists to create beautiful instruments and sculptures from single-use plastics and fly-tipped rubbish sourced from within the communities themselves.

Why are we doing this?

Half of every breath we take comes from the ocean. And yet that big blue watery thing out there that covers more than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface and the things that call it home are often invisible to those of us living in our concrete jungles. Even though half of the world’s population lives within 100 kilometres of the sea, it’s suffering from a bad case of out of sight, out of mind.

Our ocean is full of life, but its inhabitants are in trouble

Though vast, our ocean is not limitless and it needs our help. 275 million tonnes of plastic waste is generated every year around the world. That’s the equivalent weight of over 2.3 million blue whales – the largest animal to have ever lived. That’s a lot of rubbish. Only 5 percent of all plastic waste is recycled, and the rest of it has to go somewhere –usually in our ocean or landfill. We can all really easily help by being better at recycling and using less single-use plastic, especially things like straws, which get used once and then thrown away.

Please help us by donating to our Crowdfunder campaign (there are lots of amazing rewards up for grabs) or by sharing our campaign video.

Thank you,

Team Wildscreen

Jan 27

#LoveSpecies nominee: pelagic thresher

Nominated by: Sharks4Kids

Why do you love it?

The pelagic thresher has a tail that can be as long as the body itself. It uses this tail to stun prey, which has earned them the nickname “ninja shark.” This amazing adaptation makes this animal truly unique.

What are the threats to pelagic thresher?

This shark is listed as Vulnerable (VU) on the IUCN Red List and the population is decreasing. They are targeted by commercial fisheries for their fins, meat, liver oil and skin. They are also caught as bycatch on tuna longlines. It is estimated that thresher shark fins make up 2-3% of the fins auctioned off in Hong Kong markets.

What are you doing to save it? Our team does not work directly with these sharks, but we are working to spread education and awareness about the species to students around the world. We are promoting the addition of all 3 species of thresher shark to the CITES Appendix II listing. We have also introduced a new

Our team does not work directly with these sharks, but we are working to spread education and awareness about the species to students around the world. We are promoting the addition of all 3 species of thresher shark to the CITES Appendix II listing. We have also introduced a new colouring fact sheeting to get students excited about this species.

VOTE NOW!

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