Jun 5

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, May 29, 2015

Invasive predators, deforestation driving Tasmanian parrot over the edge


Swift parrot in branches

Research shows that 50.9 percent of female swift parrots nesting on the main island of Tasmania were killed by sugar gliders while incubating eggs. In addition, industrial logging is the principle cause of habitat loss in the swift parrot’s breeding range.

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Sugar glider on branch preparing to leap

Article originally published on Saturday, May 30, 2015

Wildlife agencies urge US to curb illegal ivory trade


African elephant calf covered in mud

The World Wildlife Fund and African Wildlife Foundation both expressed that the United States should emulate China’s destruction of confiscated ivory. “Major ivory consuming countries hold the key to saving Africa’s elephants,” said Ginette Hemley, WWF senior vice president of wildlife conservation. Every year 25,000-30,000 African elephants are poached to supply the ivory trade.

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Article originally published on Sunday, May 31, 2015

Don’t try to “adopt” lost bear cubs, Oregon Wildlife officials warn


Yearling American black bear playing

Oregon Wildlife officials urged the public to not take bear cubs home after an incident in which a bear cub was spotted begging for food and showed no fear of humans. Cubs, which have been “adopted” and then released into the wild never learn to care for themselves and become easy prey for hunters.

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Article originally published on Monday, Jun 1, 2015

“Purring” wolf spiders softly serenade mates


Female two-coloured wolf spider

Male wolf spiders use vibrations to serenade females, but it only works if female wolf spiders can feel the vibrations. The courtship must occur on conductive surfaces such as dead leaves. Their sensitivity to vibrations might also help them avoid predators.

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Article originally published on Tuesday, Jun 2, 2015 

Pollution and climate change are deforming and killing Alaska’s frogs


Wood frog tadpole

A recent study found that even a small amount of copper can have big consequences for amphibians such as the wood frog. The presence of copper in the environment altered the behavior of tadpoles so they spent more time near the surface of the water, which made them easier prey.

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Article originally published on Wednesday, Jun 3, 2015

Trainers banned from performing with ‘world’s loneliest orca’


Three orcas spyhopping

Lolita, a wild-caught orca will no longer perform with her trainers. This move by the Miami Seaquarium comes after a decision by NOAA in February that determined that Lolita deserved the same protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as her wild kin.

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Article originally published on Thursday, Jun 4, 2015

Seven tiny frog species found on seven mountains


Shield toad (Brachycephalus pernix)

The seven frog species discovered in southeastern Brazil are all less than 1 cm long and belong to the genus Brachycephalus. The sensitivity of these frogs to their environment accounts for different species being found on different mountains. The most visible difference between these new species is the texture and color of their skin.

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Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

May 1

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Apr 24, 2015

Fracas over Costa Rican shark-fin exports leads American Airlines to stop shipping fins


Smooth hammerhead photo

An American Airlines plane traveling from Costa Rica to Hong Kong was carrying 904 lbs. of dried hammerhead shark fins when it touched down in Miami. The ensuing outcry caused by the incident led to American Airlines announcing that it has ceased to ship shark fins. The species’ fins found on the plane were from the vulnerable smooth hammerheads and the endangered scalloped hammerheads.

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Scalloped hammerheads swimming with fish

Article originally published on Saturday, Apr 25, 2015

Wildlife officials move forward to lift wolf protections


Mackenzie Valley wolf

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission decided to move forward with the process of delisting the grey wolf from their endangered species list. The two options they are considering are: delisting the wolves statewide or partially, in eastern Oregon only.

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Article originally published on Sunday, Apr 26, 2015

New England amphibian migration endangered by late spring


Wood frog on mossy log

Every spring salamanders and frogs use vernal pools to mate and lay eggs. With the delayed spring, the time available for offspring to grow is reduced, which could affect their development. Among the affected species is the wood frog.

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Article originally published on Monday, Apr 27, 2015

Bumblebees use nicotine to fight off parasites


Vestal cuckoo bee on flower

Parasite-infected bumblebees that consume nicotine-laced nectar delay the progress of the infection. However, the life expectancy of these bumblebees is not increased. On the other hand, healthy bees that consume nicotine appear to shorten their lifespans.

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Article originally published on Tuesday, Apr 28, 2015

Five tons of frozen pangolin: Indonesian authorities make massive bust


Sunda pangolin

Officials in Medan, Sumatra confiscated 169 lbs. of pangolin scales and 96 live Sunda pangolins from a smuggler. The pangolins were destined for China, where their scales are used in traditional Chinese medicine.

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Article originally published on Wednesday, Apr 29, 2015

Jane Goodall wants SeaWorld shut down


Orca pair underwater

Jane Goodall believes the marine park giant should be shut down because the tanks for dolphins and whales create an “acoustical hell”. Goodall also noted that she hoped the awareness generated by documentaries like “Blackfish” led to greater understanding of how amazing these animals are.

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Beluga whale swimming

Article originally published on Thursday, Apr 30, 2015

Can assisted reproduction save the cheetah?


Juvenile cheetah

Today’s cheetah population suffers from low genetic diversity with most living cheetahs being between 5 percent and 10 percent genetically alike. Cheetah experts agree that assisted reproduction is only a stop gap with the real progress involving restoring habitat and preventing their hunting and killing.

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Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

Feb 13

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

The following article was originally published on Friday, Feb 6, 2015.

 Giant clam = giant impact: study compiles how mega-clams impact seas


Fluted clam showing shell shape

Giant clam on reef









Young giant clams serve as a food source for many species, but some like the fluted clam also serve as habitats for other organisms. Moreover, dense concentrations of the small giant clam can even create small islands called mapiko.

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Small giant clam


The following article was originally published on Saturday, Feb 7, 2015.

Frontline teams ‘unaware’ of wildlife smuggler tactics

Javan rhinoceros in shallows of river

African elephant family









 An important step in fighting wildlife trafficking is educating freight forwarders and handlers of air, ship, and land cargoes. When disguised it is often difficult to identify horns and tusks, that belong to rhinos and elephants, respectively.

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The following article was originally published on Sunday, Feb 8, 2015.

Washington state mulls ban on capture of killers whales for entertainment

Orca pair underwater


Currently 57 orcas are in captivity in 14 marine parks in eight countries. Of those captive orcas, 25 are in SeaWorld parks in Texas, California, and Florida.

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The following article was originally published on Monday, Feb 9, 2015.

Pollinator collapse could lead to a rise in malnutrition

Female common carder bumblebee feeding from flower

A pollinator collapse could increase nutrient deficiency across local populations by up to 56% in Zambia, Bangladesh, Uganda and Mozambique. While most of the spotlight falls on bees other pollinators like butterflies and wasps are also of grave importance.

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Common wasp carrying food to nest

Monarch butterfly resting on a flowering plant









The following article was originally published on Tuesday, Feb 10, 2015.

Recently discovered, critically endangered bird gets its first reserve

Araripe manakin in habitat

Discovered in 1998, the Araripe Manakin has received 140 acres of land for a reserve. There are only 800 extant individuals who live within Brazil’s Chapado do Araripe.

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The following article was originally published on Wednesday, Feb 11, 2015.

Drones may aid bird studies without ruffling feathers

Common greenshank hunting

greater flamingo coming in to land









Researchers tested how flamingos and common greenshanks reacted to drones. They found that birds became agitated if the drone swooped down toward them as opposed to flying overhead. It might prove useful for birds that inhabit areas inaccessible to humans.

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The following article was originally published on Thursday, Feb 12, 2015.

The gray wolf spotted near the Grand Canyon this fall has already been killed by a hunter

Eurasian wolf side view

Coyote walking through snow









Last year, a gray wolf was spotted near the Grand Canyon, which had not happened in decades. Unfortunately, in late December this same wolf was killed by a hunter who mistook it for a coyote.

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Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA


Jun 12

Last weekend marked World Oceans Day, a day dedicated to celebrating the beauty and bounty that our oceans provide, and raising awareness of the importance of protecting them. Here at ARKive, we’ve been inspired by the watery realm, and thought we’d honour our fellow mammals by submerging ourselves in the wonderful world of whales and dolphins.

Winged whale

Humpback whale image

An instantly recognisable species, the humpback whale is named for the distinctive ‘hump’ formed by its back as it prepares to dive. Its long flippers, another characteristic feature, can grow up to five metres in length, and contribute to this vocal cetacean’s scientific name, Megaptera novaeangliae, which means ‘big-winged New Englander’.

Marine misnomer

Orca image

Orcas are easily distinguishable by their striking black and white markings and their imposing, triangular dorsal fin. Interestingly, these fascinating marine mammals have a rather misleading alternative name – killer whales. While they are certainly efficient predators, they are not whales and are, in fact, the largest members of the dolphin family. Orcas usually hunt in pods, although individuals from some populations are known to deliberately beach themselves in order to snatch sea lions resting on the beach before wriggling back to sea with their prey.

Social cetacean

Dusky dolphin image

The charismatic dusky dolphin is a highly social species, sometimes being found in pods of over 1,000 individuals and frequently associating with other cetacean species. This beautiful marine mammal is said to be one of the most acrobatic of all dolphins, often making energetic leaps out of the water and performing impressive tumbles in the air.

Underwater unicorn

Narwhal image

There’s no mistaking the unique narwhal, a species famed for the hugely elongated tooth or ‘tusk’ which protrudes from its upper lip. The longest of these incredible appendages was recorded at over 2.5 metres in length, and the males use these bodily weapons in jousting bouts. The narwhal is found throughout the waters of the Arctic, as well as in the northern Atlantic Ocean, and it tends to stay close to pack ice.

Cerebral cetaceans

Bottlenose dolphin image

Quite possibly the most famous of all cetaceans, the bottlenose dolphin is much-loved by many. This extremely intelligent species is highly social, and uses a wide range of clicks and whistles to communicate with other members of its pod. Like some other species of cetacean, the bottlenose dolphin seeks out prey using echolocation, and individuals in a pod will work together as a team to round up schools of fish into tight balls upon which the dolphins can feed. When not chasing prey or performing impressive leaps, dolphins are able to rest one side of their brain at a time. This allows them to sleep while remaining conscious enough to surface and breathe.

Moby Dick

Sperm whale image

The strange-looking sperm whale can be forgiven for having such a bulbous head, given that it has the largest and heaviest brain of any living animal! And its record-breaking statistics don’t stop there – capable of diving for up to two hours at a time, the sperm whale can dive to depths of 3,000 metres, making it the deepest-diving mammal. The largest of the toothed whales, the sperm whale is famed in literature as Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, but sadly it is classified as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, primarily as a result of historic and present-day hunting.

Sea scars

Risso's dolphin image

A somewhat unusual-looking mammal, Risso’s dolphin can be identified by its long, pointed flippers, bulbous, beakless head, and the conspicuous scars present all over its body. These markings are thought to be caused by bites from other individuals of its kind during playing or fighting, but some scars could be the result of squid bites.

White whale

Beluga whale image

Although it is also known as the white whale, the beluga whale is actually born with dark grey to bluish- or brownish-grey colouration, only achieving the striking white hue as it matures. It is one of just a few cetaceans with a flexible neck, and it is capable of pursing its lips to suck up prey. The beluga whale is sometimes referred to as the sea canary because of the high-pitched twittering noises it produces.

On the brink

Baiji image

The baiji, or Yangtze River dolphin, is a very shy and graceful freshwater dolphin species with a very long, narrow, slightly upturned beak and small eyes placed high on the face. Sadly, it is thought that the Critically Endangered baiji could actually now be extinct. In 1999, only four individuals of its kind were observed, and an intensive search of its range in 2006 resulted in none being seen. The major threats to the baiji are considered to be illegal fishing using electricity, and being caught as bycatch in fishing nets.

Ocean giant

Blue whale image

We couldn’t possibly finish this round-up of ten incredible cetaceans without including the biggest of them all – the blue whale! The biggest animal to have ever lived, the blue whale has a heart the size of a small car and is capable of eating more than 4 tonnes of krill per day during the summer months. Whereas some cetacean species communicate using a series of high-pitched clicks and whistles, the blue whale produces a variety of low-frequency sounds, which may also serve the purpose of sensing the environment and detecting prey.

Is your favourite whale or dolphin not featured here? Then why not comment below to let us know what it is and why you love it!

If you’re looking for a fun challenge, check out ARKive’s ocean-themed scavenger hunt – there may well be a few cetaceans hidden in there!

Find out more about whale and dolphin conservation:

Kathryn Pintus, ARKive Text Author


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