Dec 13
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Guest blog: Conservation Photography – Changing the world one photograph at a time

Photographs have the power to change the world by altering the perceptions and understanding of the viewer. Conservation photography can bridge language barriers, be easily understood and can create a sense of wonder and/or sadness that instills a sense of responsibility in the viewer. It can motivate a “Call to Action”. 

Sharks hauled ashore for their fins by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

Conservation photography is increasingly being used across the globe to promote and garner support for conservation and the environment.   Conservation photographers provide visual evidence that can be a powerful tool in showcasing the splendor, challenges and threats the natural world faces. A visually powerful photograph can evoke strong emotions that inspires us to action, changes our collective behaviours and in this manner reduces our negative impacts on this fragile earth.  

Lion_by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

1 of 20. At a time when lions are in the spotlight due to rapidly decreasing populations from habitat loss and hunting pressures, the battle scars on this male lion portray the challenges that the species faces. 

Tiger shark at the dubai fish market by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

2 of 20. A tiger shark lies on the chopping block with a silent scream and is waiting to have its fins sliced off to fulfill the greed of someone who wrongly sees the fins as a delicacy.

Cape mountain zebra capture by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

3 of 20. The numbers of endangered species are on the increase due to mans destructive ways and only a few are prepared to go to the lengths of trying to protect them from extinction. Here a cape mountain zebra lies anesthetized and awaiting translocation to begin a new founder population – a positive story for conservation. 

Cattle egret severly burnt during quelia control excersise by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

4 of 20. This cattle egret sits on a veterinary table after being “napalmed” and caught as “bycatch” during a quelia eradication program in a large wetland. Surprisingly this practice is legal. 

Conservation photography itself though is about so much more than just photographs showcasing the natural world. It is about pursuing a conservation issue and exposing the underlying consequences of that issue to the general public. 

Abalone poachers tatoo by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

5 of 20. Our natural resources are being plundered at unsustainable rates and where poaching may have been initially to put food on the table, it is now part of globally organised crime. Natural products are usually the “cash crop” that funds other illicit activities  yet the nature of the crimes are seen as minor and petty.

Poached abalone shells lying on the shores of robben island by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

6 of 20. While there is a huge outcry about the terrible poaching epidemic hitting Africa’s rhino and elephant populations, the world generally turns a blind eye to the large scale pillaging of our oceans. Many marine species are now at greater risk of extinction than terrestrial species.

Abalone poachers shack by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

7 of 20. This run down shack in a poverty stricken area stands in stark contrast to the luxury car and large boat used for abalone poaching that drives much of the organised crime within the Western Cape of South Africa.

Gravesite of a fisher by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

8 of 20. Small scale fishers place their lives at risk when trying to put food on the table and often go to sea in small unsafe fishing vessels that easily get destroyed in rough weather and result in the loss of the life of the fisher.

It is about showing that we as human beings are closely inter-twined with the environment and that our very own survival depends upon the health of the environment. Highlighting these issues effectively places an immense responsibility on the shoulders of the photographer and to be a conservation photographer requires dedication to telling impelling visual stories that can raise awareness and effect change! 

Walking the dwesa beach at dusk by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

9 of 20. Man is intricately linked to the environment and our future well-being is dependent on its protection

Mozambican poling his dugout canoe by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

10 of 20. In poverty stricken and rural areas, communities are far more dependent on the health of the environment than people living in urban areas. Yet, these rural communities are usually the first to bear the brunt of urban land transformation over the environment.

Herding the cattle by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

11 of 20. A young cattle herder leads his cattle to the days grazing grounds in rural Mozambique.

Conservation Photography is not just about the final image. It includes all the hours of preparation, planning, costs, time away from home, early mornings, late nights, frozen fingers, sunburnt faces, arduous hikes, tropical diseases and harsh environments that one often finds oneself having to “endure” in pursuit of a photograph.

Peter Chadwick photographing seascapes

12 of 20. Conservation photographers will often take risks in order to try and get the “perfect” shot.

Peter Chadwick photographing seascapes

13 of 20. Taking these risks does not always pay off and occasionally “mother nature” has a sense of humor!

African black oystercatchers taking off by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

14 of 20. The hours spent in trying to obtain the “telling” image for conservation photography does bring incredible rewards that makes all the effort and patience worthwhile.

For those that are willing to go the extra mile, the rewards are always worth it and their results speak louder than words.

Fish research project at De Hoop Marine Protected Area by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

15 of 20. Conservation photography must not only showcase the wonder of the environment and the negative threats, but also the science and conservation that will provide telling opportunities for the future.

Tagging a galjoen for research by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

16 of 20. It is the long-term research and science that allows us to understand our negative impacts on the environment, but also provide us with solutions for future generations.

Fisher hand reaching for fish in a trek net by wildlife and conservation photographer Peter Chadwick

17 of 20. Where this science is heeded, previously negative practices may be turned around and conservation efforts can result in sustainable opportunities for the future.

Carefully crafted photojournalism takes the value of conservation photographs to the next level by creating a thought-provoking story, that not only highlights the beauty but also explodes the horrors and destruction of our environment in a manner that makes us wish to protect and preserve.

Avocet hanging on farm fence by wildlife and cosnervation photographer Peter Chadwick

18 of 20. A delicate pied avocet hangs dead from a farm fence that lies between two water bodies – our biodiversity is not only facing direct threats from humans but also face many indirect threats.

Mozambican child waving by wildlife and cosnervation photographer Peter Chadwick

19 of 20. The protection of the environment is no longer just about ensuring survival of species but also about ensuring food and water security for our future.

A thought provoking image only has to change the opinion of one viewer to make a difference. That one person will tell another, who will tell another and soon a revolution of change will be ignited. This change needs to happen at both an environmental and social level, for we need to realise that if we do not change our ways, what is happening to the environment will eventually happen to us.

photographer silhoette

20 of 20. As a photographer, you have the incredible opportunity to make a difference to support the conservation of the environment – the question is, are you willing to make your photographs mean so much more than just a pretty picture?

Conservation photography therefore has the ability to inspire us to change the course of humanity and halt the destruction of this planet! Are we prepared to take up that challenge and use our photography far more effectively? African Conservation Photography aims to take up that challenge and through powerful imagery, become an agent of change.

Peter Chadwick

http://www.peterchadwick.co.za/

Dec 2
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Nature’s guide to selfies

New to the world of selfies? Unsure how to get the perfect shot? Don’t worry, ARKive and the animal kingdom are here to help with our guide on how to take the selfie world by storm:

1. Always make sure the camera is in focus

Brown bear image

2. Make sure you have your whole face in the shot

Badger image

3. Remember to accentuate your best features

Atlantic yellow-nosed albatross

4. Don’t be afraid to smile…

Guadalupe fur seal image

…or pout…

Sumatran orangutan image

…or pull a funny face!

Namaqua chameleon image

5. Use a selfie to make a fashion statement

Northern rockhopper image

6. Or to show off a new hairdo

Sooty albatross image

7. Use selfies to let the world know how you are feeling

Hippopotamus image

8. Try using your environment to make your selfies more creative

Crested black macaque image

9. Use the sun to get a more flattering light

Southern plains gray langur image

10. Remember, never get too close to the camera

South American squirrel monkey image

11. Watch out for photobombers…

Crested black macaque

…there could be a lot of them

Southern rockhopper penguin image

12. And finally, always remember to face the right way!

Black-backed jackal image

 Do you have a favourite animal selfie? If so share it with us on Facebook or Twitter, we would love to see them!

Jemma Pealing, ARKive Content Officer

Sep 20
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ARKive is a Champion Partner for National Geographic’s Great Nature Project

Great Nature Project logoWhether this is your first visit to ARKive or you are an ARKive superfan, odds are you’ve come to see amazing imagery of the world’s wildlife from the tiny water flea to the massive megamouth shark. We believe that films and photos are an incredible way to get up close and personal with animals and plants from around the globe and so do our partners at National Geographic and the Great Nature Project.

ARKive has been named a Champion Partner for the Great Nature Project – a week-long, picture-based BioBlitz event taking place around the world from September 21-29, 2013. Together, we’re working to build the world’s largest online album of animal photos.

Photo of Northern Raccoon

To join in, snap a picture of a plant or animal in your neighborhood, and upload it to a photo sharing site like Flickr, Instagram, Twitter or Facebook, making sure to tag it #GreatNature and #ARKive. ARKive has its very own collection on the Great Nature Project website right alongside collections from National Geographic Explorer’s-in-Residence and celebrities like Jewel.

ARKive's Great Nature Project Collection

We’ll be curating our collection daily and add our favorite shots to the collection so check back often. Whether you’re exploring a park or a playground, join us in celebrating the wild world through imagery!

Liana Vitali, ARKive Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

Jul 31
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Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children

Wildlife photography is a fantastic way to discover nature – using your eyes and a camera to really explore and enjoy the natural world. You can have great fun creating stunning wild images whatever camera you have (SLR, pocket compact camera or mobile phone) and wherever you live.  Often the most exciting discoveries are right on our doorsteps – the highlight of my career was photographing a sleeping kingfisher just a few metres from house (they are unique images as far as I know)!

King of Sleeps JPG

Sleeping kingfisher © Iain Green

Whether you enjoy the artistic side of nature photography, or maybe wish to record the different wildlife and behaviour you see (probably a mixture of both) here are my top tips to help you take great wildlife shots.

 Local sites such as your garden, nearby park, beach or nature reserve offer some of the best opportunities for wildlife photography. By regularly exploring these local wild spaces you can build a detailed photographic study and create unique images. Visit sites at different times of the day and year to determine when wildlife activity is at its peak and where is the best spot to photograph.

• Do as much research as you can about the wildlife & habitats you hope to see – books, internet and wildlife charities are great Young Photographer  IG (P&C)sources. Quiz experts and local reserve staff for wildlife knowledge and advice, they are normally very happy to help.

• Get-up early, or go out late to get the best lighting conditions – especially in summer. If photographing bugs or flowers in middle of the day, use a reflector or piece of white card to bounce sunlight on to the shady side of your subject.

• Slow down and take time to think about your composition. Look for, bold colours, striking patterns or exciting action to create stunning photos. When photographing animals make sure you focus on the eyes. Experiment with composition by moving your subject off-centre and using scene features as natural frames

• Change your viewpoint. Get down low to your subjects eye-level for a better perspective and to portray nature in its own habitat. Don’t forget to look straight up or down to discover beautiful natural patterns in plants and trees. Photographing from below can make things look bigger or more impressive.

• Compact cameras are fantastic for photographing mini-beasts or flowers – don’t use the zoom, but carefully move your camera in close. The macro (flower symbol) setting on pocket cameras enables you to focus on something just a few cm away, creating striking frame-filling images.

• Learn how your camera works and don’t be afraid to experiment with different settings, such as exposure and focussing.

• Above all else get out and photograph, the best photographs are created by spending time outside and not in a camera shop. And be patient with wildlife, you may have to wait or make several visits for that special image.

Vole really close

If you are patient you could get some really great shots like this water vole image © Iain Green

Iain Green is a professional wildlife photographer and founder of www.WildWonder.co.uk, a social enterprise engaging young people, schools and adults with nature through discovery and creativity.

Jun 15
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ARKive’s Top 10 Most Viewed Wildlife Photos

If you had to take a guess at how many wildlife photos are in the ARKive collection at this moment, what would you guess? 1000? 10,000? Actually, the ARKive collection has put a face to 15,500+ species from around the world with over 94,000 images!

Today is Nature Photography Day so we thought it was the perfect time to share the top 10 most viewed wildlife photos on ARKive starting with …

#10

Photo of green anaconda

This picture of a 12 foot long green anaconda has brought loads of visitors to ARKive. Since the species holds the title for largest snake in the world, we’re thinking that might have something to do with its popularity.

#9

Photo of bald eagle

We’re not surprised to see this national emblem of the United States in the top 10 rankings. An interesting fact about the species you may not know is that bald eagles are thought to be monogamous meaning they pair for life.

#8

Photo of giant panda

While the bald eagle is synonymous with the USA, the giant panda is certainly synonymous with China. Perhaps this picture is so popular because it depicts the species doing what it does best … eating loads of bamboo. How much does it eat exactly? Up to 18 kg or 40 lbs of bamboo a day!

#7

Photo of lion

We think we see a theme emerging here with some of the world’s largest species dominating the list! One of the largest big cats in the world, lions can take down prey many times bigger than themselves. This particular lion is using a termite mound as a prime vantage point for a future meal.

#6

Photo of tiger

Coming in a very close 2nd in our World’s Favorite Species campaign last month, the tiger is arguably one of the most popular cat species in the world and also the only cat with stripes. Their stripes are so unique that each tiger has its own set of stripes that identifies them much like a fingerprint!

#5

Photo of cheetah

Are you surprised to see yet another cat species on the list? We’re not! Cheetahs are always crowd favorites and an action shot like this gives a glimpse into how powerful this species can be.

#4

Photo of king cobra

The longest of the world’s snakes, the king cobra is also highly venomous and, instead of hissing when danger approaches, it will emit a low, distinctive growl. It’s encouraging that this picture is so popular since this snake is being rescued from a coffee plantation where it would have otherwise been destroyed by plantation workers.

#3

Photo of polar bear

The largest living land carnivore, the polar bear is one of the best known species in the world and another top species in our World’s Favorite Species campaign. When standing on its two rear legs, the males of the species would tower nearly any living human at up to 2.6 meters or 8.5 ft in height!

#2

Photo of orca

We’re finally diving into the ocean on this list with the most widespread mammal in the world (after humans), the orca. This shot of an orca surfacing shows off the signature dorsal, or top, fin of the species beautifully.

And now, for the most viewed wildlife image on ARKive …

#1

Photo of great white shark

This shot of the tremendous great white shark tops our list of most viewed wildlife images on ARKive. As such a fascinating species in so many ways, it’s hard to pinpoint what exactly makes this species so popular. Its powerful, stream-lined body, ability to sense electric fields with its snout, unique capability to give birth to live young and dominating status as the top predator of the marine food chain may all be factors in making this image the most popular.

What do you think? Would this picture be your #1 most-viewed choice? If you had to pick one favorite picture out of all 94,000 on ARKive, could you? Have a look through ARKive and share your favorites in the comments below!

Liana Vitali, ARKive Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

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