May 22

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, May 15, 2015

The war on India’s tiger preserves

Bengal-tiger-portrait

Bengal tiger

The government of India provides funds to help willing residents move out of protected tiger habitat and onto nearby farmland.  At times, however, factors working against tigers include luxury resort chains that want to build “ecotourism” lodges that do not allow tigers to live nearby. Other times, it is mining companies that wish to move deeper into protected areas.

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Article originally published on Saturday, May 16, 2015

Controversial bear hunt awaits final approval from Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

American-black-bear-scratching-head

American black bear scratching head

Florida is awaiting approval to host its first bear hunt in 20 years. The hunt is considered a method of controlling the bear population, since Florida has seen an increase in human-bear conflicts. Opponents of the bear hunt note that improperly secured food/trash attracts bears and that people should focus on trash management and not on hunts.

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Article originally published on Sunday, May 17, 2015

Wildlife experts counteract fallacies about coyotes

Adult-coyote

Adult coyote

Two recent coyote attacks in Bergen county, New Jersey have brought this canid to the forefront of the conversation about wildlife. Wildlife experts stress that while coyotes are predators, they very rarely attack humans. They also informed the public that coyotes are not the top carriers of rabies in the area. Most importantly, coyotes play a vital role in the ecosystem by controlling rodent populations.

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Article originally published on Monday, May 18, 2015

Fuzzy ducklings are the future of this Hawaiian species

Male-Laysan-duck

Male Laysan duck

The Laysan duck is a critically endangered bird endemic to Hawaii that in 1911 had fewer than 20 birds due to invasive rats. Conservation efforts brought the population back to almost 1,000 birds, but 40 percent of them were lost in 2011 due to the Japan Tsunami. In 2014, however 28 young Laysan ducks were moved to Kure Atoll State Wildlife Sanctuary in an effort to establish a population on Kure.

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Article originally published on Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Giant panda gut bacteria can’t efficiently digest bamboo

Giant-panda-eating-bamboo

Giant panda eating bamboo

The giant panda is known for primarily eating bamboo, but the microbiota it harbors in its stomach actually resembles that which is found in carnivores, a recent study found. It poses a conundrum since pandas spend up to 14 hours a day consuming up to 12.5 kg of bamboo leaves and stems, yet can only digest 17 percent of it.

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Article originally published on Wednesday, May 20, 2015

EU concerned about farming impact on its wildlife

Skylark-portrait

Skylark

In the EU major threats to grasslands, wetlands, and dune habitats were overgrazing, fertilization and pesticides. Fifteen percent of birds in the EU are near threatened or in decline including once common birds such as the skylark.

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Article originally published on Thursday, May 21, 2015

Photos from the front: the California oil spill in pictures

Adult-gray-whale-breaching

Adult gray whale breaching

On Tuesday, an underground oil pipeline burst near Goleta, California spilling crude oil into the Pacific. Whales and sea lions were spotted in the area where the spill occurred.  It is estimated that 21,000 gallons of crude oil entered the ocean.

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Young-California-sea-lion

Young California sea lion

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

May 8

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, May 1, 2015

Bat wings use sensory cells to change shape mid-flight

Bechsteins-bat

Bechstein’s bat

The hair on a bat’s wings has receptors that fire messages to the brain, which allow them to slow down quickly and make tight turns. In most mammals, pathway messages from the forelimbs travel to the neck, in bats however, messages travel to both the neck and the trunk.

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Article originally published on Saturday, May 2, 2015

Malnourished sea lion found hidden under car in San Francisco

Young-California-sea-lion

Young California sea lion

A sea lion pup was coaxed from its hiding spot through the efforts of police and animal rescue crews. Apparently this is the second time that this particular pup has been found wandering the streets. Diminishing food sources, appear to be one of the reasons that several pups have been found malnourished and sick.

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Article originally published on Sunday, May 3, 2015

Starfish suffer mysterious and gruesome demise along west coast

Crown-of-thorns-starfish-

Crown of thorns starfish

From southern Alaska down to Baja California, sea stars have been dying in droves. The cause seems to be a poorly understood wasting disease known as sea star associated densovirus.  Encouraging though, is the news that baby sea stars have been found along the coast in some of the affected areas.

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Article originally published on Monday, May 4, 2015

Wolves and coyotes feel sadness and grieve like humans

Eurasian-wolf-side-view

Eurasian wolf

Author Marc Bekhoff describes how a pack of wolves lost their spirit and playfulness after the loss of one of their female members. He also hypothesizes that similar to dogs, wolves and coyotes can experience physiological disorders.

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Adult-coyote

Adult coyote

Article originally published on Tuesday, May 5, 2015

30 illegal orangutan pets seized in West Kalimantan

juvenile-southern-bornean-orangutan-p-p-wurmbii-

Juvenile southern Bornean orangutan

Thirty orangutans being kept as pets have been seized and placed in a rehabilitation center. Orangutans usually live with their mother until the age of seven or eight. The orangutans are learning to fend for themselves so they can be released into the wild.

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 Article originally published on Wednesday, May 6, 2015

New species of diving beetle found living in isolation in Africa

Great-diving-beetle-portrait

Great diving beetle

A scientist has discovered a new species of diving beetle on the outskirts of Cape Town, South Africa. It has no direct relatives and has been placed in its own genus with its scientific name being Capelatus prykei. Its closest relatives are diving beetles found in the Mediterranean and New Guinea.

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Article originally published on Thursday, May 7, 2015

New species of marine worm discovered on the Antarctic Deception Island

Peacock-worm

Peacock worm

The new species (Parougia diapason) belongs to a group of marine worms that commonly occur in marine seabeds rich in organic matter. The species was found in the bones of a common minke whale.

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Dwarf-minke-whale-head-detail

Common minke whale

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

Apr 24

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Apr 17, 2015

Your name here: auctioning the naming rights to new species to fund conservation

Titan-beetle-climbing-branch

Titan beetle climbing branch

Ecologist, Mary Lowman was on a mission to save Ethiopia’s church forests so she needed an innovative way to fundraise. Thus began the process of auctioning off new species’ naming rights which includes several different new species of beetle.

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Article originally published on Saturday, Apr 18, 2015

Approving a hunt is a misguided solution to bear problem

American-black-bear-cinnamon-morph-female-with-cinnamon-and-black-cubs

American black bear and cinnamon morph black bears

On Wednesday (Apr 15), the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved a plan to legalize bear hunts in Florida, specifically targeting the black bear. The rationale is that their population has rebounded and that there has been an increase in human-bear encounters.

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Article originally published on Sunday, Apr 19, 2015

Sea lion pup taken from Dockweiler Beach parking lot, witness says

Young-California-sea-lion

Young California sea lion

A witness  saw four people harassing two sea lion pups; the pups were not injured. The suspects then took one of the pups and put it in their car and drove away. The whereabouts of the pup are unknown at this time.

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Article originally published on Monday, Apr 20, 2015

Kemp’s ridley sea turtles are mysteriously vanishing

Kemps-ridley-turtle-hatchlings

Kemp’s ridley turtle hatchlings

In 2010, nest numbers for Kemp’s ridley turtle fell by 35 percent at primary nesting beaches with slight increases in 2011 and 2012. 1n 2014, however the nest total was the lowest in eight years. While the BP oil spill may be a factor, other researchers suggest that colder water temperatures might have affected their populations

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Article originally published on Tuesday, Apr 21, 2015

Judge recognizes two chimpanzees as legal persons: a first

Eastern-chimpanzee-subordinate-pant-in-response-to-dominant-grunt

Eastern chimpanzee

Hercules and Leo, the chimpanzees have been determined to be people in New York courts. Both chimpanzees were being used for biomedical experiments. Now, they will spend the rest of their lives at an animal sanctuary.

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Article originally published on Wednesday Apr 22, 2015

Elephant contraception? How a vaccine is replacing sharpshooters

African-elephant-family

African elephant family

Elephants used to be killed by the hundreds in South Africa to keep their numbers below a certain threshold. At Greater Makalali, however, the vaccine PZP has cut the rate of increase of the population by half, its success has led to its adoption in other South African wildlife reserves.

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Article originally published on Thursday, Apr 23, 2015

Could Bees Be Addicted to Pesticides?

Honey-bee-asleep-during-cold-weather

Honey bee asleep during cold weather

It appears that bees prefer to eat pesticide –contaminated plants. Neonicotinoids may act like drugs to make “foods” containing these substances more rewarding. Previous research has shown that neonicotinoids scramble the memory and navigation function in bees.

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Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

Apr 10

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Apr 3, 2015

‘Lazy’ sea lion sons rely on mothers milk while diligent daughters learn to hunt

Galapagos-sea-lion-pup

Galapagos sea lion pup

For the first two years of their life, male Galapagos sea lions barely make any effort to hunt. Meanwhile, many young females hunt at sea even before their mothers wean them.

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Article originally published on Saturday, Apr 4, 2015

How do hummingbirds fly in wind and rain?

Ruby-throated-hummingbird-male-feeding-on-kalanchoe-flower

Ruby-throated hummingbird male feeding on flower

Researchers placed hummingbirds within a wind tunnel to observe their response to different wind speeds. They twist their bodies to accommodate the airflow which expends more energy, but allows them to continue flying in place.

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Article originally published on Sunday, Apr 5, 2015

Florida wildlife officials ask people not to ‘help’ gopher tortoises

Gopher-tortoise-in-burrow-entrance

Gopher tortoise in burrow entrance

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Department urged people to not help gopher tortoise hatchlings to the ocean, since they cannot swim.  The announcement was made after three instances occurred of people trying to help.  The public was reminded that not all turtle species can swim.

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Article originally published on Monday, Apr 6, 2015

Aceh’s purge of illegal oil palm at 3,000 hectares and counting

Young-Bengal-tiger

Young Bengal tiger

Oil palm plantations are being removed to protect the people from ecological disaster. The plantations lie within the protected Leuser Ecosystem (KEL), the last place where the Sumatran rhino, elephant, tiger, and orangutan coexist in the wild.

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Indian-elephant-bull

Indian elephant bull

Article originally published on Tuesday, Apr 7, 2015

Overfishing leads to crashes in sardines and other forage fish

Pacific-sardine

Pacific sardine

Forage fish are essential food for bigger predators thus playing a vital role within the ecosystem. U.S. fisheries managers are deciding whether to shut down fishing for Pacific sardines since stocks are declining.

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Article originally published on Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015

The truth about magpies

Magpie-stealing-Partridge-egg

Magpie stealing partridge egg

Magpies have a notorious reputation for being thieves of shiny baubles and preying upon the defenseless chicks and eggs of songbirds.  The reality however, is that they are interested in objects, their shininess is irrelevant. While they may prey on songbirds, there is no evidence to suggest they cause population crashes.

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Article originally published on Thursday, Apr 9, 2015

Farmers urge return of jaguars to protect crops

Female-jaguar-resting-in-vegetation-by-river

Female jaguar resting in vegetation

White-lipped peccaries damage farmers’ crops in Brazil as their populations grow and farmers are considering alternatives to hunting. One option is maintaining well-connected jaguar habitat on their agricultural properties thereby allowing jaguars to naturally control peccary populations.

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White-lipped-peccaries-caught-on-camera-trap

White-lipped peccaries caught on camera trap

Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

Mar 27

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News

ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Mar 20, 2015

Pleasure palace in Lao facilitates wildlife poaching for Chinese elites

Chinese-pangolin

Chinese pangolin

A city-sized resort in Laos is facilitating large scale wildlife trafficking for Chinese tourists. Visitors can openly buy endangered species products including pangolins and helmeted hornbills.

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Helmeted-hornbill-male-with-large-stick-insect-to-be-delivered-to-female-in-nest

Helmeted hornbill male

Article originally published on Saturday, Mar 21, 2015

Green sea turtle still at risk, say wildlife agencies

Green-turtle-ventral-view

Green turtle ventral view

Hawaii has fewer than 4,000 nesting green turtles with 96 percent of them nesting at French Frigate Shoals. This makes the population highly vulnerable to disease outbreaks.

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Article originally published on Sunday, Mar 22, 2015

Opossums may come to humans’ rescue for snake anti-venom

Patagonian-opossum-portrait

Patagonian opossum

Opossums suffer no ill effects from snake bite venom due to a protein which appears to neutralize the venom. Poisonous snake bites account for the death of 20,000 humans a year.

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Article originally published on Monday, Mar 23, 2015

Skin microbiome may hold clue to protect threatened golden frogs from lethal fungus

Golden-arrow-poison-frog-on-leaf

Golden arrow poison frog on leaf

Researchers applied the beneficial bacteria from the skin of several  wild Panamanian frog species that were Bd-resistant to the skin of the golden arrow poison frog hoping it would confer resistance. While this procedure did not confer resistance, researchers learned that survivors of the fungus already possessed unique bacterial communities prior to the experiment.

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Article originally published on Tuesday, Mar 24, 2015

World’s forest have fragmented into tiny patches

Munchique-wood-wren-on-the-hand-of-a-scientist

Munchique wood-wren

Fragmentation reduces biodiversity by up to 75%. Some fragmented regions house endemic species such as the Munchique wood-wren that exists in only a handful of peaks in the Colombian Andes, but these are now isolated from each other by pastures and roads.

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Article originally published on Wednesday, Mar 25, 2015

Elephant poaching rate unchanged – and still devastating

Forest-elephant-bull

Forest elephant bull

Around 20,000 elephants were killed in 2014, which is the same as 2013. China remains the largest market for ivory, while the United States is second.

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Article originally published on Thursday, Mar 26, 2015

Why there is a record number of starving sea lion pups this year

Young-California-sea-lion

Young California sea lion

Since the start of the year, more than 1,800 sea lion pups have washed up on California shore from San Diego to San Francisco. Researchers are looking at warmer oceans as the primary culprit.

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Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA

 

 

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