Aug 12
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Share your summer stories with ARKive

Photo of sessile oak tree in summer

Sessile oak tree in summer

With the summer holidays now well underway in many countries, it’s the perfect time for kids and adults alike to get outside and enjoy the wildlife around them. If you’re planning a trip to a nature reserve, beach or wild space near you, or simply enjoy spotting the creatures in your own garden, why not have a go at writing about what you find?

Here at ARKive we would love to hear all about your summer wildlife experiences, and now you can share them with us as part of ARKive’s Summer Stories!

Photo of red admiral on nettle

Red admiral on nettle

Your story can be about anything related to wildlife or the outdoors – why not tell us about a walk you’ve been on or an interesting animal or plant you’ve spotted? If you’re stuck for inspiration, here are a few ideas to start you off:

  • The Great Outdoors
  • In the Garden
  • On the Beach
  • Urban Wildlife
  • Under the Sea

Share your stories

If you’d like to take part, please email your story to us at arkive@wildscreen.org.uk, including your name and age, before the 1st September 2013. If you are under 16 years of age please make sure you get permission from your parent or guardian before sending in your stories.

We’ll be publishing our favourite stories here on the ARKive blog at the end of the summer. We look forward to reading about all your wildlife adventures!

Photo of common starfish in rockpool habitat

Common starfish in rockpool habitat

Try our fun summer activities!

Looking for more fun stuff to do with your kids over the summer? Why not check out our Fun Stuff pages for cool games, arty activities, quizzes and more!

And if you’ve had a go at one of our creative Animal Activities, we’d love to see photos of your creations – you can share them with us on Twitter, Flickr or Facebook.

Liz Shaw, ARKive Text Author

Jul 31
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Guest Blog: Wildlife Photography Tips For Children

Wildlife photography is a fantastic way to discover nature – using your eyes and a camera to really explore and enjoy the natural world. You can have great fun creating stunning wild images whatever camera you have (SLR, pocket compact camera or mobile phone) and wherever you live.  Often the most exciting discoveries are right on our doorsteps – the highlight of my career was photographing a sleeping kingfisher just a few metres from house (they are unique images as far as I know)!

King of Sleeps JPG

Sleeping kingfisher © Iain Green

Whether you enjoy the artistic side of nature photography, or maybe wish to record the different wildlife and behaviour you see (probably a mixture of both) here are my top tips to help you take great wildlife shots.

 Local sites such as your garden, nearby park, beach or nature reserve offer some of the best opportunities for wildlife photography. By regularly exploring these local wild spaces you can build a detailed photographic study and create unique images. Visit sites at different times of the day and year to determine when wildlife activity is at its peak and where is the best spot to photograph.

• Do as much research as you can about the wildlife & habitats you hope to see – books, internet and wildlife charities are great Young Photographer  IG (P&C)sources. Quiz experts and local reserve staff for wildlife knowledge and advice, they are normally very happy to help.

• Get-up early, or go out late to get the best lighting conditions – especially in summer. If photographing bugs or flowers in middle of the day, use a reflector or piece of white card to bounce sunlight on to the shady side of your subject.

• Slow down and take time to think about your composition. Look for, bold colours, striking patterns or exciting action to create stunning photos. When photographing animals make sure you focus on the eyes. Experiment with composition by moving your subject off-centre and using scene features as natural frames

• Change your viewpoint. Get down low to your subjects eye-level for a better perspective and to portray nature in its own habitat. Don’t forget to look straight up or down to discover beautiful natural patterns in plants and trees. Photographing from below can make things look bigger or more impressive.

• Compact cameras are fantastic for photographing mini-beasts or flowers – don’t use the zoom, but carefully move your camera in close. The macro (flower symbol) setting on pocket cameras enables you to focus on something just a few cm away, creating striking frame-filling images.

• Learn how your camera works and don’t be afraid to experiment with different settings, such as exposure and focussing.

• Above all else get out and photograph, the best photographs are created by spending time outside and not in a camera shop. And be patient with wildlife, you may have to wait or make several visits for that special image.

Vole really close

If you are patient you could get some really great shots like this water vole image © Iain Green

Iain Green is a professional wildlife photographer and founder of www.WildWonder.co.uk, a social enterprise engaging young people, schools and adults with nature through discovery and creativity.

Jul 18
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ARKive’s Top 10 Summer Photographs

Summer has officially arrived here in the UK, and the sunny days mean that the ARKive team are itching to get out and about and enjoy the good weather. For those not lucky enough to be out enjoying the sunshine just yet, why not have a browse through some of our favourite summer photographs to get you in a summery mood?

1. Bees

Honey boo photo

One of the insects most commonly associated with summertime is the bee. This photograph beautifully captures a buff-tailed bumblebee feeding on the nectar of a summer flower.

2. Monarch butterfly

Monarch butterfly photo

Summer is also the main time to find butterflies. Caught mid-flight, these monarch butterflies are shown during their long distance migration. This species can travel around 3,000 miles at speeds of up to 80 miles per day.

3. Common starfish

Common starfish photo

The common starfish is widely associated with visits to the seaside and exploring rockpools. Sand, seaweed and the sighting of an occasional starfish definitely represent the summer holidays for many people. If you plan to explore the coast this summer, make sure you try our Beach Treasure Hunt!

4. Arctic fox

Arctic fox photo

The Arctic fox  is superbly adapted for life at sub-zero temperatures, and while this species is known for its pristine, white winter coat, during the summer it is almost unrecognisable.

5. Lesser crested tern

Lesser tern photo

There is nothing like cooling off in the water on a hot summer’s day, and we love this shot of young lesser crested terns piling into the water to take a dip.

6. Emperor dragonfly

Emperor dragonfly photo

A dragonfly darting around a pond is a favourite summer sight. This photo beautifully captures the emperor dragonfly mid-flight.

7. Sunflower

Sunflower photo

Sunflowers are always a bright and cheery sight. Did you know that each sunflower is not a single flower, but many small reddish-brown disk flowers surrounded by yellow ray flowers?

8. Montipora coral

Montipora coral photo

As almost everyone hopes for a summer getaway, this image of montipora coral shows clear skies and sparkling blue sea.

9. Southern plains gray langur

Southern plains gray langur photo

There is nothing better than a breath-taking view on a summer’s evening, and these southern plains gray langurs seem to have picked an excellent spot!

10. West Indian Manatee

West Indian manatee photo

This water looks so inviting that we almost feel jealous of this West Indian manatee!

Which of ARKive’s photos represent summer for you? Use the comments form below and let us know!

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