Feb 21
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Turtles take over Twitter – Live Q & A with Professor Brendan Godley

Turtles took over @ARKive’s Twitter account yesterday when turtle expert Professor Brendan Godley answered your burning questions about sea turtles. We loved Brendan’s guest blogs about his turtle research and leatherback turtles, so we were delighted when he offered to take time out of his busy research schedule on Ascension Island to tweet about turtles (in temperatures of 35 °C).

And Brendan wasn’t just feeling the heat on Ascension, but also on our Twitter stream. You tweeted some tricky questions to test his expertise, but we think you’ll agree that he came up turtle trumps! Here are just some of the #turtletweet highlights:

Photo of female flatback turtle digging nest

Female flatback turtle digging nest

Turtles on Ascension

@JellicleKat You’re out on Ascension Island at the moment…how long is the nesting season, and how many females nest there? #turtletweet

In the 1930s it was down to a few hundred but now about 5000 per year. 6 month season. #turtletweet

@inthefieldnews  Sea turtles return to the same beach where they hatched as juveniles to breed…but where do they go in between?

They go to one or more foraging areas that can be many thousands of miles. eg here on Ascension its Brazil #turtletweet

Top Turtle Facts

@eldenney: what’s your most interesting turtle fact? Thanks! #turtletweet

The fact that green turtles can rest at the bottom of the Mediterrannean sea for as long as 10.5 hours #turtletweet

@eldenney Cool! I can’t stay underwater for much more than 30 secs! Green turtles are impressive #turtletweet

Photo of green turtle with turtle barnacles

Green turtle with turtle barnacles on its shell

@clairecjl: Hi Brendan, I was wondering how long it takes leatherbacks to reach full size? #turtletweet

This is still debated, with work to be done but anywhere between 10 and 20 years seem the best estimates to date. #turtletweet

What’s the difference between a turtle and a terrapin?

@lillashaw Hi Brendan, we were debating this in the office the other day… What’s the difference between a turtle and terrapin? #turtletweet

Its semantics N america everything can be a turtle, in UK turtle is sea, terrapin is freshwater, tortoise on land. #turtletweet

Turtles and fishing

@Jess_Cripps Do you think more could be done by fisheries to reduce the bycatch of turtles in their equipment? #turtletweet

I do. Much has been done already TEDS (trawlers), Circle hooks (longlines) and these can be improved #turtletweet

One of the great ongoing challenges is that of how to minimise bycatch in gillnets #turtletweet

Photo of a green turtle trapped in fishing net

Green turtle trapped in fishing net

Which species of turtles are thriving? Which are endangered?

RT @DanielsImage: @ARKive@BrendanGodley How many species of sea turtles are there? Are any thriving? #turtletweet

.@DanielsImage @BrendanGodley Big winners r Atlantic green turtles, ones struggling incl Pacific leatherbacks and hawksbills. #turtletweet

Photof of front on view of a hawksbill turtle

Hawksbill turtle

Why are turtles endangered?

@harrypurplmonky What has happened to make turtles endangered? #turtletweet

Exploited for meat and eggs for a long time &have started to recover where they r protected on beach and sea#turtletweet

Photo of green turtle shells, butchered alive for blood and meat

The shells of green turtles, butchered alive for blood and meat

.@inthefieldnews… what would you say is the biggest threat facing sea turtles worldwide?

as with all marine biodiversity; I would say it fishing followed by climate change #turtletweet

Climate Change

@Jess_Cripps: Do you think turtles will start to breed earlier in response to climate change? #turtletweet

Not yet but it will soon! In Cyprus they are already 90% female…will get worse with inc temps #turtletweet

@eldenney: poor boys! #turtletweet

Photo of Kemp's ridley turtle hatchlings

Kemp’s ridley turtle hatchlings

Plastic Pollution

@Wildlife_Jason: What would you say is the worst problem for #turtles caused by #plasticpollution in our oceans?

“Turtles, partic babies & all leatherbacks eat it..less of a problem than fisheries though” via @BrendanGodley #turtletweet

Photo of green turtle suffocating on plastic bag

Green turtle suffocating on plastic bag

Turtles on film

@WildscreenFest: What part does wildlife filmmaking has to play in #turtle conservation? #turtletweet

@Wildlife_Film: What did you think of the footage of baby green turtles in @BBCNature #Africa?bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01… #turtletweet

As seen on recent #Africa, there is clearly a role. MT are emblomatic #turtletweet

@Podgeosaurus: When filming do you think crews should aid baby turtles, or stay hands off? #turtletweet

Difficult one; up to individs. they shouldnt do is make things worse by releasing in daylight or hold hatchlings back#turtletweet

@lauriebelch why do some populations of turtles hatch in the day when it seems that predation risk is much higher#turtletweet

.@ARKive @lauriebelch very few do, but for obvious reasons we see more of it on film. More starlight cameras needed. #turtletweet

How can we help turtles?

@eldenney: so is there anything we can do to help turtles? #turtletweet

think about seafood choices, climate change and your role, get involved or help those who are.#turtletweet

@DanielsImage: Our support $ only go so far. Are there any organizations to support turtles you favor? #turtletweet

If I was to plump for one I would choose @seaturtle .org which is a one man show, no overheads and has transformed the field

@dodger_wake Some may not like it can we not ‘farm’ the endangered turtles to allow survival rates for eggs to raise then release

It’s done in the Cayman Islands for over 40 years, adults are now returning that were released #turtletweet

Cute or shocking photos?

@wild_photos: Our question for @ARKive’s#turtletweet! What do you think is more powerful in conservation: cute turtle images or ones showing turtle loss?

.@colaciregui @wild_photos @KACHUGABUT pictures of baby turtles always draws a gasp from the crowd! :)

Photo of young hawksbill turtle caught in a fishing net

Young hawksbill turtle caught in a fishing net

Turtle thanks!

@harrypurplmonky Wow what a #turtletweet! TY @ARKive & @brendangodley Harry’s learned so much about turtles & conservation!… http://fb.me/KGOX0CX8

@Wildlife_Jason @BrendanGodley @ARKive Thanks for an informative #turtletweet time! :)

 

We’d like to join our followers in thanking Professor Brendan Godley for his turtle-takeover – informative, thought-provoking, and turtle-tastic!

Get regular updates from Brendan by following him on Twitter @brendangodley, and check out his recommended top tweeters: @UoExeterCEC, @EcoSoc_Tremough, @LifeNatureMag and @BioBlitzTremou.

Would you like to see more twitter takeovers? What topics would you be interested in? Follow @ARKive and let us know!

Mar 13
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Social Week: ARKive on Twitter

Twitter is one of our favourite online hangouts as it allows us to connect with over 225 million users from all over the world to learn about endangered species and of course share ARKive’s awesome photos, videos and facts.

In just 140 characters, ARKive can take you to the best wildlife images, introduce you to some of the most obscure species out there, as well bringing you the latest conservation stories. It’s a great way to find out what the ARKive project is all about and it’s the perfect place to connect with us!

Tweet, Tweet

We always have something to tweet about!  Below are some recent ARKive tweets:

 Check out @world_wildlife’s species of the day http://ow.ly/9sORQ

 ”Some birds can’t take the heat! New study learning what avian species are the most vulnerable to climate change  http://ow.ly/9svHj

 ”Take a break and find out if you’re a #climatechange champ! http://t.co/kHkcQPjh  #climateweek”

As you can see, we like making a noise about all things wildlife, but let’s not forget about the original tweeters – our feathered friends. So why not explore the birds on ARKive and tune your ears into the twittering of the charismatic robin in Europe, the tui in New Zealand or the prothonotary warbler in the US.

Robin singing on branch

Robin singing on branch

Retweet (RT)

Like a tweet? Want to share it with your friends? Get in on the action by simply retweeting your favourite ARKive tweets!

Repeating information is not uncommon in the animal kingdom. Many Passeriformes pick up, or imitate vocalisations of other species – a behaviour the European starling is famed for. Another famous example of reiterating information can be found in the grey wolf. Within a pack, when one wolf starts to howl, others will rapidly respond with howls of varying lengths and pitch in to form a ‘chorus howl’. This may reinforce social bonds, bring the wolves together and communicate with other packs. Perhaps rather than ‘retweet’ an ARKive tweet, you can ‘rehowl’ one instead!

Eurasian wolf pack howling

Eurasian wolf pack howling

Follow us!

African elephants are famed for their ability to follow a leader – an old female known as the matriarch leads a family of closely related females, taking on the role of protecting the group and sourcing food and water.

If you follow us on Twitter you can not only keep up to date with latest news from the ARKive team but you can also get involved by responding to our tweets.

African elephant herd walking in line

African elephant herd walking in line

African elephants walking

African elephants walking

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s the most social species on ARKive?

Join our search to find the most social species on ARKive. Visit the species you think is the most social and press ‘tweet’. The species with the most new tweets will win the title of ‘Chirpiest Species’ in our Social Species Contest. Who will win? Tweet to ensure your favourite is a contender!

Get involved

ARKive is active on Twitter so why not join our community of followers and keep up to date with the world of ARKive! We tweet about everything from the ARKive team’s favourite species to what cakes we’re eating in the office, from the latest conservation news to fun games and contests. Follow us and then tweet @arkive to say hello!

Lauren Pascoe, ARKive Media Researcher

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