Jan 21

Can you think of a species that you think is often overlooked and underappreciated? We asked this question to conservation organisations around the world for our Valentine’s Day #LoveSpecies campaign and have collated a list of almost 100 species. These species will be entered into a poll and you can vote for your favourite from  February 1st.

These species may not be the cutest…

…cuddliest…

…most charismatic…

…handsome…

Proboscis monkey

… or well-known…

Sunset frog

…but they deserve our love too!

Starting February 1st, each species will be featured on our blog, with a plea from the conservation organisation that nominated it for why it should get your vote. Voting will also open on February 1st and you’ll be able to choose your favourite until February 14th so you’ve got plenty of time to read the blogs and decide which species deserves its moment in the limelight.

WATCH THIS SPACE!

Oct 9

Wildscreen is one of three organisations to be honoured with a World Tourism Award during a ceremony on November 2, 2015 at the World Travel Market, ExCel Centre, London.

Tusk Trust and the TreadRight Foundation will also receive this prestigious award, with all of the organisations being recognised for their commitment to conservation, sustainable tourism development, creating unique initiatives to bring the travel experience to people with special needs as well as assisting local communities in overcoming challenging times.

Wildscreen has won this award: in recognition of its mission to encourage everyone to experience the natural world and help to protect it.  Wildscreen convenes the world’s best photographers and filmmakers with conservationists, creating the most compelling stories about the natural world.”

The Award itself, Inspire, was specially designed and handcrafted on the Mediterranean Island of Malta by Mdina Glass, and celebrates the qualities of leadership and vision that inspire others to reach new heights.  The Award will be accepted by Wildscreen patron, zoologist and broadcaster, Dr. George McGavin and the ceremony will be attended by the Wildscreen team and VIP guests.

Wildscreen team with patron Dr George McGavin

Wildscreen team with patron Dr George McGavin

A big thank you from the Wildscreen team!

Jan 28
The newly discovered Brookesia micra chameleon is the smallest lizard to ever be described, with the juvenile being small enough to perch on the tip of a matchstick!
This is just one example of a species featured in ARKive’s newly-discovered topic page. Explore the page to find out about other recently described species, how these species were found and why discovering new species is so important.
Brookesia micra photo

Juvenile Brookesia micra perched on a matchstick

A newly discovered species may be a species that is completely new to science, or one which has previously been described but is found to be made up of two or more separate species. With estimates that there could be between 3 million and 100 million organisms existing on Earth, and only around 1.7 million having been classified, the vast majority of life on Earth has not yet been uncovered.

Wattled smoky honeyeater photo

The wattled smoky honeyeater, discovered in 2005, was the first bird to be discovered in New Guinea since 1939

Discovering new species is very important, especially as many undiscovered species could become extinct before they are even identified. Describing and naming species is the first step towards protecting a species, as conservation strategies can then be put in to place.

The recently discovered kipunji is classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List

Many of the recently discovered species featured on ARKive have some very unusual names; the psychedelic frogfish, the David Bowie spider, the Louisiana pancake batfish and Mr Burns beaked toad. Check out the profiles of these unusually named species to find out more about them and the reasons behind their quirky names.

The strangely patterned psychedelic frogfish

Why not take a look at our newly-discovered species page today and discover some new species for yourself!

Jemma Pealing, ARKive Media Researcher
Jul 30

More amazing photos, videos and texts are added to ARKive every alternate week. Here is a summary of our latest update:

The stats

• 245 new species
• 1589 new images
• 89 new media donors
• 55 new texts
• 74 species ‘top facts’

What’s new – our favourite new species

White-nosed coati photo

We’ve added a new profile for the white-nosed coati

 

Geranium maderense

We’ve added a profile for the Critically Endangered Geranium maderense

 

Barred owl photo

We’ve also added a new profile for the barred owl

 

Strawberry frog

We have a new profile for the charismatic strawberry frog

 What’s new – our favourite new top facts

Blue whale photo

We’ve added interesting top facts for the blue whale

 

Tiger photo

We’ve added 5 great facts for the tiger

 

Ostrich photo

We’ve also added amazing top facts for the ostrich

Get involved!

If you have any photos, footage or species information that you think we should add to ARKive please let us know. There are many ways to get involved with ARKive, from contributing your photos to just spreading the word about us – every little helps!

Full details

Subscribe to our RSS feeds for full details of what’s new to ARKive.

Jun 21

More amazing photos, videos and texts are added to ARKive every alternate week. This week the ARKive team reached a new milestone, we now have over 15,000 species profiles on ARKive! Here is a summary of our latest update:

The stats
  • 34 new species
  • 200 new images
  • 4 new videos
What’s new – our favourite new species
 
Reef manta ray photo

We've added a new profile for the Vulnerable reef manta ray

 

Red-crowned roofed turtle photo

We have also added the Critically Endangered red-crowned roofed turtle

What’s new – our favourite new images

Kloss’s gibbon photo

We have added great new images of Kloss’s gibbon in the wild

What’s new – our favourite new videos

Common agama photo

Check out new videos of the common agama

 

Eastern whip-poor-will photo

We've also added new footage of the oddly named eastern whip-poor-will

Get involved!

If you have any photos, footage or species information that you think we should add into ARKive please let us know. There are many ways to get involved with ARKive, from contributing your photos to just spreading the word about us – every little helps!

Full details 

Subscribe to our RSS feeds for full details of what’s new to ARKive.

About

RSS feedArkive.org is the place for films, photos and facts about endangered species. Subscribe to our blog today to keep up to date!

Email updates

Sign up to receive a regular email digest of Arkive blog posts.
Preferred frequency:

Arkive twitter

Twitter: ARKive