Jan 14

Kyrgyzstan is a beautiful country in Central Asia best known for its walnut forests and vast mountain ranges. Tall peaks, deep valleys, and glaciers make up Kyrgyzstan’s breathtaking geography. Its diverse wildlife makes Kyrgyzstan quite a gem in Eurasia and certainly a country worth exploring. Join us on a virtual tour of this country full of wild surprises and much more!

Fine feathered friend

Eurasian golden oriole photo

The name Eurasian golden oriole says it all. This golden-feathered bird lives in deciduous forest habitat however, despite its bright plumage, the golden oriole can blend into dense foliage. If you listen closely, you may hear this bird whistle a flute-like song or even a “chr-r-r” alarm call.

Gallant galloper

Asiatic wild ass photo

This mammal looks a lot like a horse, doesn’t it? The Asiatic wild ass roams freely in Kyrgyzstan feasting on woody plants. Even though it lives in semi-desert conditions, it’s always found close to a water source and actually gets its water from snow throughout the winter.

Frequent flier

Red chaser photo

While photos have been taken of the red chaser, not much is known about this species. One thing we do know is the red chaser goes through several stages of life development. This insect begins its life cycle as aquatic larvae and then molts several times before transitioning into adulthood.

Restful reptile

Afghan tortoise photo

Don’t be fooled! While the Afghan tortoise‘s scales and shell look like it’s heavily armored and ready for action, this tortoise actually isn’t very active at all. It tends to stay dormant during the summer and hibernate most of the winter. Sometimes this reptile is only awake three months out of the year!

Beautiful boar

Wild boar photo

The wild boar is a social animal living in herds of 6 to 20. With its omnivorous appetite, the wild boar feeds on seeds, roots, fruit, and even animal matter. The wild boar is considered an ancestor of most domestic pig breeds and can be found nearly everywhere as it has one of the largest distributions of all land mammals. Quite extra-oink-inary!

Lengthy lizard

Desert monitor photo

Desert monitors are opportunistic predators; they will do just about anything to find food including climbing trees, swimming, and digging! Despite being a rather gangling looking reptile growing to three feet in length or longer, the desert monitor makes impressive ground in a day sometimes traveling 5-6 kilometers!

Blue-billed bird

White-headed duck photo

The white-headed duck is one of the rarest wetland birds. It is a very skilful swimmer and does much better in water than on land. When it dives, the white-headed duck can stay under water for forty seconds at a time. An interesting fact about the white-headed duck? In late winter, this bird loses its feathers and cannot fly!

With its varied geography and ever-changing climate, it’s no wonder Kyrgyzstan is filled with amazing species. The animals on this list have found clever ways of adapting to their environments. Have you explored the hundreds of other species on ARKive that call Kyrgyzstan home? Have a look today!

Andrea Small, Education & Outreach Intern, Wildscreen USA

Dec 20

We live on an amazing planet

From the mighty blue whale to the diminutive pygmy seahorse, the myriad life forms with which we share this world are an endless source of wonder and awe.

ARKive's blue whale species page

ARKive's pgymy seahorse species page

 

Wildlife photographs and films are essential for sparking the connection between people and nature. Of the 1.3 million or so plants and animals discovered and named by science so far, the average human will only personally encounter a fraction of these species. Images and films are the only way the faces and stories of many species are shared.

This is the heart of ARKive’s mission; to use the power of stunning wildlife imagery to inspire everyone to discover, value and protect our amazing natural world. 

Please donate

This holiday season, your donation will help us to continue to bring the natural world into the hearts and homes of people around the world. No donation is too small and every donation of $15 or greater will be matched by a family foundation that passionately supports ARKive.

Planning to do your holiday shopping online?

AmazonSmile is a simple way to support your favorite charity: ARKive!  Amazon Smile has the same prices, products and tools as Amazon.com but with the added benefits of supporting ARKive while you shop! Click on the link below, search for and select WildscreenUSA (spearheading ARKive efforts in the US) and start shopping. Through Amazon Smile, 0.5 % of your purchase will go towards supporting the work of ARKive both in the US and worldwide.

ARKive's Amazon Smile link

Click to start donating 0.5% of your purchases to ARKive

No matter which donation option you choose, we are incredibly grateful for your support. With a helping hand from you,

ARKive's Sumatran orangutan species page

we can work together to keep ARKive a free and inspirational resource for all!

Happy holidays,

The ARKive Team

Oct 25

We’ve been sending out sneak peek teasers about our newest educational adventure all week but the time has come to fully unveil it. The Engineering in Nature Challenge is now live on ARKive Education complete with a Starter Kit and the 5 different engineering challenges that students can complete during this 3 week event, all inspired by nature!

Challenges include building a beak, exploring seed dispersal, learning about light reflection in trees, designing a gliding bird, and engineer an octopus suction pad.

         All of the Engineering in Nature challenges are inspired by wildlife in the ARKive collection!

Now, before you dive right into the challenge, be sure to sign up using the link below:

Sign up for the Engineering in Nature Challenge!

Why sign up? 

For this challenge, ARKive has partnered with Iridescent, a science education nonprofit that links science professionals with under privileged youth through its innovative learning platform, the Curiosity Machine. Every student registered for the challenge will be paired with a real world scientist who will work with them to create their Nature in Engineering Challenge inventions and these aren’t just any scientists! The mentors for the Engineering in Nature Challenge are practicing science at distinguished institutions such as Harvard, Stanford and more!

Signing up for the challenge also includes an invitation to our weekly Google Hangout events where Iridescent and ARKive team members will be there to support you throughout the three week challenge period in any way we can.

Ready to go?

So, are you ready to bring engineering to the classroom in a WILD way? Then, sign up today and have a look at the challenge materials on ARKive!

 Download the Engineeing in Nature Challenge Materials

Our first rounds of Google Hangouts are starting up. Join us next Friday, November 1 at 4pm ET or 4pm PT! We look forward to “seeing” you!

Liana Vitali, ARKive Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

Oct 15

Have you ever marveled at the different sizes and shapes of bird beaks or wondered just how an octopus suction pad really works? Each of these specialized adaptations in wildlife embodies a principle in engineering. Examples of engineering in nature can be found all around us whether it’s the structure of a seed pod that allows it to fly or float great distances, or the way that light filters through the leaves of a tree on a sunny day.

We are excited to announce a new learning project available to educators this fall in collaboration with Iridescent, a science education nonprofit that links science professionals with under privileged youth through its innovative learning platform, the Curiosity Machine. In this three week program called the Engineering in Nature Challenge, students ages 11-14 can learn up to five different engineering concepts all from the natural world and test their skills through invention:

Challenges!

 

Learn how a bird beak is a simple machine.

 

 

 

 

Discover flight and gliding adaptations of seed pods.

 

 

 

Explore reflection and incidence angles through light reflection in trees.

 

 

 

Test aerodynamics knowledge and skills by building a gliding bird.

 

 

 

Engineer an octopus suction pad while discovering air pressure, vacuum and suction forces.

 

Teachers can choose to do any combination of activities from the list above and each activity features films from the ARKive collection that demonstrate the engineering concepts in action.

There are two aspects to this project that make it unique from any other learning experience. First, teachers will be offered continuous support from ARKive and Iridescent team members through weekly Google Hangouts including kick-off and culmination hangouts. The team will be available to introduce you to Iridescent and the Curiosity Machine platform, troubleshoot any questions from the classroom,  and recommend additional wildlife imagery from ARKive. Second, each student will be paired up with a scientist working in the field that will offer advice and helpful feedback on the student’s work and these aren’t just any scientists! The mentors for the Engineering in Nature Challenge are practicing science at distinguished institutions such as Harvard, Stanford and more.

Iridescent pic

Child participating in an Engineering in Nature Challenge by building a gliding bird

The Engineering in Nature Challenge is a learning experience unlike any other inspiring students to explore engineering principles while developing a greater connection to nature all with the one-on-one support of exceptional real world scientists.

If you are interested in learning more about the Engineering in Nature Challenge, sign up for a sneak peek by clicking the link below.

Sneak Peek Sign Up!

You will be one of the first educators to receive the Engineering in Nature Challenge info before it goes live on the ARKive site on October 24. We look forward to sharing this learning experience with you!

Liana Vitali, ARKive Education & Outreach Manager, Wildscreen USA

Jul 31

Wildlife photography is a fantastic way to discover nature – using your eyes and a camera to really explore and enjoy the natural world. You can have great fun creating stunning wild images whatever camera you have (SLR, pocket compact camera or mobile phone) and wherever you live.  Often the most exciting discoveries are right on our doorsteps – the highlight of my career was photographing a sleeping kingfisher just a few metres from house (they are unique images as far as I know)!

King of Sleeps JPG

Sleeping kingfisher © Iain Green

Whether you enjoy the artistic side of nature photography, or maybe wish to record the different wildlife and behaviour you see (probably a mixture of both) here are my top tips to help you take great wildlife shots.

 Local sites such as your garden, nearby park, beach or nature reserve offer some of the best opportunities for wildlife photography. By regularly exploring these local wild spaces you can build a detailed photographic study and create unique images. Visit sites at different times of the day and year to determine when wildlife activity is at its peak and where is the best spot to photograph.

• Do as much research as you can about the wildlife & habitats you hope to see – books, internet and wildlife charities are great Young Photographer  IG (P&C)sources. Quiz experts and local reserve staff for wildlife knowledge and advice, they are normally very happy to help.

• Get-up early, or go out late to get the best lighting conditions – especially in summer. If photographing bugs or flowers in middle of the day, use a reflector or piece of white card to bounce sunlight on to the shady side of your subject.

• Slow down and take time to think about your composition. Look for, bold colours, striking patterns or exciting action to create stunning photos. When photographing animals make sure you focus on the eyes. Experiment with composition by moving your subject off-centre and using scene features as natural frames

• Change your viewpoint. Get down low to your subjects eye-level for a better perspective and to portray nature in its own habitat. Don’t forget to look straight up or down to discover beautiful natural patterns in plants and trees. Photographing from below can make things look bigger or more impressive.

• Compact cameras are fantastic for photographing mini-beasts or flowers – don’t use the zoom, but carefully move your camera in close. The macro (flower symbol) setting on pocket cameras enables you to focus on something just a few cm away, creating striking frame-filling images.

• Learn how your camera works and don’t be afraid to experiment with different settings, such as exposure and focussing.

• Above all else get out and photograph, the best photographs are created by spending time outside and not in a camera shop. And be patient with wildlife, you may have to wait or make several visits for that special image.

Vole really close

If you are patient you could get some really great shots like this water vole image © Iain Green

Iain Green is a professional wildlife photographer and founder of www.WildWonder.co.uk, a social enterprise engaging young people, schools and adults with nature through discovery and creativity.

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