May 25

A worthy winner of the World’s Favourite Species campaign, the kakapo clearly has a lot of fans! We thought we would revisit this unusual and charismatic bird as our Endangered Species of the Week – here’s what makes it special…

 

Photo of kakapo walking

Kakapo (Strigops habroptila)

Species: Kakapo (Strigops habroptila)

Status: Critically Endangered (CR)

Interesting Fact: The kakapo is the largest parrot in the world, and is also the only flightless parrot species.

An extremely rare, nocturnal parrot, the kakapo was once widespread across New Zealand, but is now confined to two predator-free offshore islands. This unusual bird feeds on a variety of fruits, seeds and other plant material and generally lives alone, coming together only to breed. During the breeding season, male kakapos produce a loud ‘boom’ call to attract a mate, which can be heard up to five kilometres away. The kakapo is long-lived but breeds slowly, usually only once every two to five years. When threatened, rather than running away the kakapo freezes, relying on its mossy green, mottled plumage to help it blend into the forest floor.

The kakapo is highly vulnerable to introduced mammalian predators such as cats, dogs and rats. These predators, together with forest clearance and hunting, decimated the kakapo population on the mainland until the drastic step was taken of transporting the last few individuals to predator-free islands. Although the kakapo population remains critically low at 126 individuals, intensive management through a Kakapo Recovery Programme is beginning to show positive results.

Find out more about the kakapo and its conservation at the Kakapo Recovery Programme.

See images and videos of the kakapo on ARKive.

Why not take a look at the other World’s Favourite Species winners – did your favourite make the Top 10?

Liz Shaw, ARKive Text Author

Apr 27

Save the Frogs DayToday marks the 5th annual ‘Save the Frogs Day’, an international event which focuses on raising awareness about the plight of the frog, encouraging conservation action and celebrating all things amphibian. In honour of this noble cause, we thought we would highlight some of our favourite weird and wonderful amphibians from around the world, and hopefully encourage you to get involved, spread the word about amphibian conservation and perhaps even host your own event. The ‘Save the Frogs’ website has some fantastic ideas for inspiration here, so what are you waiting for? Hop to it!

Titicaca water frog

Titicaca water frog photo

The largest truly aquatic frog, the Titicaca water frog can weigh up to 1 kg and is endemic to Lake Titicaca, which lies on the border between Peru and Bolivia. While its extremely loose skin gives it a bizarre appearance, the skin is very rich in capillaries, enabling the frog to remain underwater without having to surface for air. Unfortunately, the Titicaca water frog is under great threat as a result of over-collection for human consumption. It is blended with other ingredients to create a juice which local people misguidedly believe cures many ailments.

Gardiner’s tree frog

Gardiner’s tree frog photo

From one of the largest frogs to one of the smallest now, Gardiner’s tree frog. This diminutive amphibian is found in the Seychelles and grows to just 11 mm in length. Unlike most frogs, which must lay their eggs in water, this species lays them in small clumps on moist ground. Instead of hatching as tadpoles, the young then hatch as small, fully formed adults.

Dyeing poison frog

Dyeing poison frog photo

Perhaps one of the most beautiful of all frogs, the dyeing poison frog is famed for the alkaloid-based poison excreted from its skin. Its toxicity is obtained from its diet, which consists mainly of ants. Subsequently, in captivity the dyeing poison frog loses its toxicity as it cannot obtain these compounds through its captive diet.

Suriname toad

Suriname toad photo

A fascinating species from South America, the Suriname toad must surely take the prize for the most unusual reproductive methods in the animal kingdom. The male rolls the fertilised eggs onto the female’s back, after which the skin on her back closes around them. After an incubation period of three to four months the young emerge from her back as fully metamorphosed individuals. Cool or creepy? You decide!

Purple frog

Purple frog photo

Only discovered in 2003, the purple frog is the sole surviving member of an ancient group of amphibians that evolved around 130 million years ago. This strange-looking frog is adapted to a burrowing lifestyle, spending most of the year up to 3.7 metres underground and emerging for a few weeks to breed at the surface.

Rabb’s fringe-limbed treefrog

Rabb's fringe-limbed treefrog photo

Perhaps one of the saddest stories from the amphibian world, Rabb’s fringe-limbed treefrog was described as a new species as recently as 2008, but the arrival of the fungal disease chytridiomycosis in the only known population appears to have driven the species to extinction in the wild. As of early 2012, a single male remained in captivity, believed to be the very last of its kind anywhere in the world after the only other known individual, another captive male, was euthanised due to poor health.

Darwin’s frog

Darwin’s frog photo

Discovered by Charles Darwin, the unusual Darwin’s frog is another species with a rather strange method of reproduction. The male possesses a large vocal sac, but rather than producing a loud call, he uses it for an altogether different purpose. It is his job to guard the fertilised eggs, and after they have been developing for around 20 days he uses his tongue to pick them up and manoeuvre them into his vocal sac. The tadpoles hatch and metamorphose within his vocal sac, emerging from his mouth when their tails are reduced to stumps. Check out a video of tadpoles moving within a male’s vocal sac .

Get involved

Golden frog photoIf you’ve been inspired to do your bit for amphibian conservation we would love to hear what you are up to. Don’t forget that you can also vote for the golden frog in our current campaign to find the World’s Favourite Species and spread the love for frogs!

You can also check out our feature page on amphibian conservation and have a go at collecting uninfected mountain chickens in our Team WILD game!

Claire Lewis, ARKive Researcher

Apr 24

This year ARKive and Bristol Festival of Nature are both celebrating their 10th anniversaries! Each are marking the occasion in very special ways: while ARKive is asking the world to vote for their favourite species, the Festival of Nature is setting out to discover Bristol’s wildlife with Bristol99 – an exciting project that aims to connect people in the city with nature on their doorstep through a variety of wildlife events across Bristol’s ninety-nine best sites for nature.

Wherever you live, there are always fascinating species to be found, and with these two celebrations happening at the same time, it seemed like a good idea to talk about the three of ARKive’s shortlisted favourites that you might find right here in the city of Bristol: the red fox, the peregrine falcon, and the barn owl.

Red fox 

Red fox raiding dustbin for scraps

First, the red fox. If you live in the UK, it’s probably the species you’re most likely to have on your tick list, and with Bristol being home to the famous BBC Natural History Unit, it’s become a bit of a film star over time. Foxes began colonising Bristol in the 1930s, when suburbs of semi-detached houses sprung up on the city outskirts, with large gardens that provided an ideal habitat. The population grew rapidly, spreading to the city centre, and foxes can be seen regularly across the city. Keep your eyes peeled after dark!

Peregrine falcon

Urban peregrine falcon ssp. anatum at nest with large brood of four chicks

Peregrine falcons are best known for being the fastest animal in the world, reaching speeds of up to 200mph! In the UK, peregrines have increasingly moved into urban areas in recent years, and Bristol has a number of residents and visitors. Last summer, a pair nested on a ledge of a building by the city’s harbour and were regularly spotted circling the city centre hunting for food for their single chick. The steep cliffs of the Avon Gorge are the best place in Bristol to view these birds, with one viewing spot even named Peregrine Point! Here local enthusiasts gather between April and October, when the peregrines are most active, and observe their day to day activity.

Barn owl

Barn owl photo

Finally, the barn owl. This beautiful bird suffered a decline in numbers throughout the twentieth century which has been attributed to the use of certain agricultural pesticides and an overall loss of habitat. You are more likely to spot a barn owl in the countryside, where it inhabits riverbanks, field edges and roadside verges, but Bristol is blessed with a number of large parks on the outskirts of the city such as Ashton Court and Stoke Park, where if you are lucky, you may catch a glimpse of an owl at dusk as they come out to hunt.

Nature on your doorstep

With three of the nominated 50 species in the running for World’s Favourite Species being found on our doorstep here in Bristol, it just goes to show that you don’t need to visit the  most exotic places and habitats to find amazing wildlife. Wherever you live, there are a whole host of exciting species just waiting to be discovered.

If you live in the Bristol area, then join us for Bristol99, as we explore our local green spaces to see what fascinating species we can uncover. It all starts with the Bristol BioBlitz on 3rd and 4th May and finishes with the Festival of Nature on 15th and 16th June, where you can join ARKive and over 150 other organisations for the UK’s largest free celebration of the natural world!

But no matter where you live, get out and enjoy nature. And don’t forget to vote for the species which deserves to be the World’s Favourite Species.

Lucy Gaze, Bristol99 Project Officer

P.S. our vote is for the peregrine

 

Bristol Festival of Nature                                         Bristol 99

 

Mar 13

It’s ARKive’s 10th birthday this year and we want you to join our celebrations by helping us find the World’s Favourite Species.

We think all the world’s species are amazing but which is your favourite? Which animal, plant or fungi is so special that it deserves to be crowned the World’s Favourite Species?

Nominate today!

Nominations are now open and it couldn’t be simpler to vote  - simply find your favourite species on ARKive and click the ‘Nominate Today!’ button.

You have until 3rd April to suggest your favourites (and yes, you can choose more than one species!), after which we’ll draw up the shortlist and put it to the public vote. This shortlist will be whittled down to determine the Top Ten World’s Favourite Species – as chosen by you.

We can’t do it without your input – please spare a few moments to make your nomination TODAY!

Need some inspiration?

There are over 15,000 species on ARKive to nominate, so here are a few suggestions to start you off…

Will you nominate the polar bear - our most visited species so far this month?

Photo of polar bear with cubs

What about a newly discovered species? Is the Louisiana pancake batfish your favourite?

Louisiana pancake batfish

The osprey features as our no.1 video, but will it be no. 1 species?

Photo of osprey in flight carrying fish

Vote now, and share your nominations on Facebook and Twitter!

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