Sep 3

This October, Bristol will be hosting a comedy night with a difference! If you’re in the UK, join us for a night of laughter and hilarity at Colston Hall, hosted by Simon Watt (Inside Nature’s Giants, the Infinite Monkey Cage) as we seek to delve deep into some of the weirdest creatures on this earth. Move away from the Panda, Tiger and Penguin and think ugly. No animal is too ugly to enter these doors – the floodgates have opened to a new era where ugliness rules! Tickets on sale now at the bargain price of £10.75 – don’t miss out!

Stand Up for Ugly Animals Banner

Featuring:

Simon Watt
Simon Watt is a biologist, writer, science communicator, comedian and TV presenter. He runs Ready Steady Science, a science communication company committed to making information interesting and takes science based performances into schools, museums, theatres and festivals.  Simon also runs the Ugly Animal Preservation Society which is a comedy night with a conservation twist.

Sara Pascoe
English writer, comedienne and actress Sara Pascoe has appeared on Never Mind the Buzzcocks, Stand Up for the Week and QI. Sara started stand-up in late 2007 and the following year was a runner-up in the Funny Women competition and placed third in the So You Think You’re Funny? new act competition.

Bec Hill
Aussie comic Bec Hill hails from Adelaide and started comedy in 2006 at the tender age of 19, when she made the national finals of the Raw new act competition. Two years later made her solo debut at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival with her show If You Can Read This My Cape Fell Off. The show won her a Critic’s Choice Award and a plethora of positive reviews, and, buoyed by success, she voyaged to the UK to take part in the Edinburgh Fringe.
Having received glorious reviews for her Edinburgh shows from the likes of Chortle and The Scotsman, Hill is now firmly based in the UK. She continues to impress on the live circuit and has set up a bi-monthly pun-based comedy night called Pun-Run, which has become a hit with seasoned comics and punters alike.

Helen Arney
Thinking that she’d left her geek past behind after graduating in Physics from Imperial College, Helen Arney proved herself wrong when she turned to writing original and funny songs inspired by science. Since touring the UK in Uncaged Monkeys with Robin Ince and Brian Cox, she’s popped up on Channel 4, BBC 2, BBC Radio 3, Radio 4, 5 Live and 6 Music, and at the Edinburgh Fringe with her award-winning solo show ‘Voice of an Angle’.
Helen also presents science on Discovery Channel in ‘You Have Been Warned’ and has filled several notebooks with rhymes for Uranus.

Dan Schreiber
Dan Schreiber is co-producer/ creator of BBC’s The Museum of Curiosity and a stand-up comedian. He also co-hosts the podcast ‘No Such Thing as a Fish’ and is one of the notorious ‘Elves’ – more commonly known as researchers – on BBC 2′s QI.

Sarah Bennetto
Sarah Bennetto is a stand-up comic from Melbourne, Australia, now living and performing in the UK. She has appeared on stage, radio and television as a stand-up comic and presenter, and is responsible for experimental comedy collective Storytellers’ Club.
Since living in London, Sarah regularly pops up on the radio, and hosts a radio show for WorthyFM, live from the Glastonbury Music Festival. Sarah has hosted Storytellers’ Club and performed stand-up comedy at festivals around the country. On television, she has appeared on ITV’s Take The Mic and Dara O’Briain’s School of Hard Sums.

Elf Lyons
Elf Lyons is a stand-up comedian, writer, director and actress. She is a founder member and compere of “The Secret Comedians”, a small comedy collective which she started when studying at Bristol University, and has since transferred to East London. She is also a co-director of OddFlock, a London based theatre company made up of a group of Drama graduates from the University of Bristol. She was Funny Women Finalist & Runner Up in 2013.

Stand up for Ugly Animals is in association with ‘The Ugly Animal Preservation Society’, Wildscreen Festivals & the global conservation organisation WWF.

Jun 5

As you know, back in May we celebrated our 11th birthday, and to mark the occasion we asked our followers to vote for their favourite Arkive highlight from the past year. A huge thank you to everyone who filled out the survey, it has been fantastic to get your feedback on what we have been doing and to find out what you felt was the most important focus for Arkive.

The results are now in and we are thrilled to announce that you chose our work profiling the world’s most endangered species as your winner. This has been a key aim for Arkive since the very beginning, and today we have over 16,000 species profiles in our collection. Of course, this work wouldn’t be possible without the support of the world’s best wildlife filmmakers and photographers, conservationists and scientists, who contribute their imagery and lend their support and advice.

Why not dive in and discover something new today?

Cotton-headed tamarin

The stunning cotton-headed tamarin is one of South America’s most endangered primates

Our 11th birthday also seemed like the ideal opportunity to give the Arkive website a fresh new look and feel, making the most of our amazing imagery. Check out our beautiful new homepage today.

May 19

With ARKive’s 11th birthday on the horizon, there couldn’t be a better time to look back and reflect on the incredible year we’ve had. From a brand new PSA featuring Hollywood actor and ARKive fan John Leguizamo, to reaching approximately 4.5 million students this year through our award-winning, curriculum-linked education resources, there is much to celebrate!

We have narrowed down this year’s ARKive headliners to 11 of our favourites, and we want you to tell us which one you consider to be the most important. Does sharing the story of 10 species on the road to recovery in our Conservation in Action campaign tick the boxes for you? Or is it the thousands of new green-flagged images in the ARKive collection that are now available for use by  not-for-profit conservation & education organisations to support their vital missions? Let us know by casting your vote here, or leaving a comment below!

Conservation in Action

To mark a decade of highlighting conservation issues, we worked closely with the IUCN Species Survival Commission Specialist Groups on our Conservation in Action campaign. Highlighting ten very different species, each on the road to recovery thanks to targeted conservation efforts led by dedicated scientific experts, this was a true celebration of conservation success stories!

Scimitar-horned oryx photo

Currently classified as Extinct in the Wild, the scimitar-horned oryx is now the subject of a captive breeding programme, which aims to eventually reintroduce the species to its natural habitat

Filling the ARK in Illinois

Through the generosity of ARKive supporters in the great state of Illinois, we were delighted to launch the our new Illinois feature page; the GO-TO source for Illinois wildlife media and natural history information, featuring over 100 native species. To celebrate the launch of this project, our conservation partners in Chicago such as Shedd Aquarium, The Field Museum and Lincoln Park Zoo wrote guest blogs sharing their favourite conservation stories in the Land of Lincoln as part of our Going WILD in Illinois mini-blog series.

Burden Falls photo

Burden Falls in Shawnee National Forest, Illinois

John Leguizamo PSA

Being a Hollywood and Broadway actor, director and producer, John Leguizamo is no stranger to the wild world, especially when it comes to the fantastic characters he has played on the big screen. Who can forget Sid, the lisping sloth in the Ice Age films, or Alex, the witty and sarcastic prehistoric bird in the recent hit Walking with Dinosaurs? In a new PSA for ARKive, John shared why he values ARKive, as well as giving a shout-out to a few of the species that amazed him when he discovered them on ARKive for the first time!

John Leguizamo photo

John Leguizamo’s PSA for ARKive

Education Resources

Our education programme inspires and motivates young people to take an interest in the natural world. We estimate that our freely available education resources will have reached 4.5million students in the last year. Some of our latest resources include: Handling Data: African Animal Maths (7-11 years), Species Discovery: Keys & Classification (11-14 years), Climate Change (11-14 years) and Indicator Species (14-16 year olds).

Species Discovery education module

Explore how scientists discover, classify and name species previously unknown to science with our Species Discovery education modules

UK Invasive Species project

Invasive non-native species are considered the second biggest threat to biodiversity worldwide after habitat loss. This year saw us set about the task of raising public awareness of the risks and adverse impacts associated with invasive non-native species in the UK through a new feature pagefun activities, two new education resources and an interactive quiz.

Signal crayfish photo

The signal crayfish is a voracious predator, and a highly invasive species in the UK

Ocean Acidification

Increasing carbon dioxide emissions have not only resulted in a global temperature rise, but have also made the oceans more acidic, and it is thought that the oceans are 30 percent more acidic today than before the industrial revolution. With our new ocean acidification topic page you can learn more about the impacts of ocean acidification and discover the species which are being affected.

Coral reef photo

It is thought that coral reefs could be the first victims of ocean acidification, with one reef being destroyed every other day.

Lonely Hearts Campaign

This Valentine’s Day we launched a new campaign on our blog and Twitter, highlighting some forlorn species looking for love and explaining what they’re looking for in a perfect partner!

Mallorcan midwife toad photo

Monty the Mallorcan midwife toad is a sensitive guy who’s great with kids and is ready to deliver a good time!

Shoebox Habitats

During the summer we created a new range of fun and free activities to download and keep the little ones entertained during the holidays. Some of the most popular were our new Shoebox Habitat packs, allowing you to build your very own jungle, African savannah, under the sea or winter scenes!

Shoebox habitat photo

Build your own jungle, African savannah, under the sea or winter scenes with our amazing shoebox habitats!

CBD programme: Islands and Forests

ARKive is following the United Nations’ Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) Programme structure to explore some of the major biomes on the planet. Over the past year we have launched the first two chapters of this project, Islands and Forests. On these new feature pages you can learn more about the importance of these habitats, discover the species that live there and find out what is being done to protect them.

Forest photo

Forests are home to 80% of the world’s terrestrial biodiversity.

Green-flagged Images

Thanks to the generosity of our media donors we now have an incredible 2,771 green-flagged images which are available to use for not-for-profit conservation or education use.

African penguin photo

African penguins by Peter Chadwick

Profiling the World’s Most Endangered Species

As ever, we continue to profile the world’s most endangered species with the help of leading wildlife filmmakers and photographers, conservationists and scientists, adding images and footage of elusive species such as the Critically Endangered Vipera anatolica, known from only a single location in Anatolia, Turkey.

Vipera anatolica photo

The Critically Endangered Vipera anatolica

If you ask us, we think ARKive’s biggest success this year isn’t what we’ve done; it’s what you’ve done!  By downloading our resources, sharing our blogs and stories on social media or forwarding our newsletters to friends and family members, you continue to help spread ARKive’s message for wildlife conservation as far as possible. Thank YOU for making this year so successful for ARKive!

Don’t forget to cast your vote here, or let us know your favourite by leaving a comment below.

Apr 18

Earlier in 2014, sixteen tiny eggs were collected from two small pockets of mangrove forest on the western side of Isabela in the Galapagos Archipelago. These eggs, each the size of the nail on your little finger, belong to one of the rarest and most range restricted birds in the world: the mangrove finch (Camarhynchus heliobates). This small, brown, unassuming bird is one of the famous Darwin’s finches and is today the rarest endemic bird in Galapagos. There are less than 100 mangrove finches alive today and last year there were only 14 breeding pairs. But why are they so critically endangered?

Mangrove Finch © Michael Dvorak

Mangrove Finch © Michael Dvorak

Until recently, one of the main threats to mangrove finches was introduced rats. As generalist carnivores, rats would seek out and feed on the eggs and chicks of finches during the breeding season. Fortunately, rats are now being controlled at the breeding sites but now a much smaller invasive species poses an even larger threat.

Philornis downsi is a species of fly native to Trinidad and Brazil. It was introduced to Galapagos in the 1960s and has now spread to 14 islands within the Archipelago. The adults of this fly are harmless, feeding almost exclusively on nectar, but in their larval stage they are blood-sucking parasites. Female flies lay their eggs in the nests of small breeding land birds. Blind, naked and weak, the mangrove finch hatchlings are an easy target for the fly larvae which feed on their blood, very often resulting in the death of the chick. In 2013, 37% of chicks were killed this way – a massive hit to such a tiny population.

Philornis downsi larvae © A. Muth

Philornis downsi larvae © A. Muth

So why are the scientists removing eggs? In an effort to ensure that the mangrove finch does not become the first bird to go extinct in Galapagos since before Darwin’s time, scientists from the Charles Darwin Foundation and San Diego Zoo are, with support from the Galapagos National Park, taking action. During the mangrove finch breeding season, females lay up to five clutches of eggs but the first few rarely survive. By taking this first clutch, hatching and raising the chicks in captivity, then releasing them back into the wild when they are old enough, the project should result in more individuals being added to the population each year.

Chick being hand fed © Juan Carlos Avila

Chick being hand fed © Juan Carlos Avila

By raising the chicks in captivity, they will have avoided the nest-bound parasites and will have been given a ‘head-start’ in life. 2014 was the first time ‘head-starting’ has been trialled on mangrove finches and it is proving a great success. The sixteen eggs have hatched and the mangrove finch chicks are being released back into the mangroves right now. The future of the mangrove finch is starting to look a little brighter.

2. Remaining mangrove finch habitat 2 - (c)Francesca Cunninghame

Remaining mangrove finch habitat © Francesca Cunninghame

For more information on the project and to keep up to date with progress, please visit www.mangrovefinchappeal.org

Dec 22

With the holidays approaching and Christmas just around the corner, the ARKive team brings you their guide to the ultimate festive films, with a wildlife twist of course!

Dove Actually

Collared dove photo

These collared doves could give the actors in this romantic comedy a run for their money when it comes to courtship!

Elf(in skimmer)

Elfin skimmer photo

While Buddy is probably the tallest elf you’ve ever seen, the elfin skimmer is the smallest dragonfly in North America!

The Polar (Bear) Express

Polar bear photo 

Although they may look bulky, polar bears can actually reach speeds of about 40 kilometres per hour over short distances!

How the Finch Stole Christmas!

 Greenfinch photo

This greenfinch might not have stolen Christmas, but he doesn’t look too happy at the thought of someone stealing his berries!

Jingle All the Ray

 Reef manta ray photo

These reef manta rays might not have to brave a toy store on Christmas Eve, but this feeding frenzy looks almost as chaotic!

The Nightjar Before Christmas

 Nightjar photo

While it may not really be the stuff  of nightmares, the eerie nightjar is most active during the twilight and superstition has it that this species used to steal milk from goats! 

Home Abalone

 Black abalone photo

It may not be completely ‘alone’ yet, but sadly the black abalone is Critically Endangered and has suffered serious declines.

Jack(daw) Frost

 Jackdaw photo

While the jackdaw might not be much use in a snowball fight, this handsome member of the crow family does have distinctive frosty blue eyes!

Barnacle on 34th Street

 Goose barnacle photo

It might not be miraculous, but it was once widely believed that barnacle geese developed from goose barnacles like these on the sides of ships!

The Muppet Christmas Caracal

 Caracal photo

With ears this large, the caracal wouldn’t look out of place in a Muppets line up!

Can you think of any other festive wildlife films we’ve missed? Post your suggestions in the comments section below!

Claire Lamb, ARKive Content & Outreach Officer

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