Jun 29

As it’s #SharkWeek we thought we’d have a browse through Arkive and select our top 10 shark images and share them with you!

1) Say cheese!

What shark list would be complete without the magnificent great white shark? Here pictured giving the photographer Ralf Kiekner a nice, big, cheesy grin.

2) Gentle giant

Despite being the largest fish in the world, the whale shark survives solely on a diet of plankton and small fish. You can’t see them in this photo but the mouth of the whale shark actually contains 300 tiny teeth, the function of which is unknown.

3) Extreme close-up

This beautiful close-up of a tawny nurse shark by Juergen Freud shows the beautiful pattern of its skin and mesmerising eyes.

4) You got a little something….

Now as all good friends know, if your buddy has something stuck in their teeth you should always tell them. Shame on the guy in the back of this photo!

5) Don’t try this at home!

Many scientists believe that sharks have a blind spot directly in front of them because of the position of their eyes, so Masa Ushoida was likely to have been completely hidden from this very photogenic tiger shark!

6) Weird and wonderful

This frilled shark portrait shows how seriously strange-looking this primitive creature is.

7) What’s lurking beneath the surface?

The second largest fish in the sea, the basking shark, grows to lengths of at least 10 metres. This half-and-half image by Alex Mustard shows the basking shark’s feeding behaviour which mostly includes swimming at the water’s surface with its huge mouth open, filtering plankton from the water that passes over its gills.

8) My, what big teeth you have!

Now, we’re big believers that every member of the animal kingdom is beautiful in its own special way. We also think in the case of the sand tiger shark, its beauty may lay within.

 

9) Sharks aplenty

Our patron Sylvia Earle, also known as ‘her deepness’, once said ‘Sharks are beautiful animals, and if you’re lucky enough to see lots of them, that means that you’re in a healthy ocean. You should be afraid if you are in the ocean and don’t see sharks’. This bit of ocean must be very healthy!

10) Freedom at last

This poor juvenile blacktip reef shark was unfortunate enough to get caught on a longline hook. Fortunately, unlike many sharks, a diver was there at the right moment to set it free.

 

Are there any shark images on Arkive that we’ve missed out of our top 10 that you think should be in there? Let us know!

Feb 1

We’ve asked conservation organisations around the world to nominate a species that they believe to be overlooked, underappreciated and unloved, and tell us why they think that they deserve a fair share of the limelight, this Valentine’s Day.

Each nominee’s story is featured on the Arkive blog with information on the species, what makes them so special, the conservation organisation that nominated them and how they are working to save them from extinction.

Click the ‘unloved species’ tag above to see all of the nominations and their blogs.

Once you have perused the blogs you can vote for your favourite to help get them into the top ten unloved species and get them the recognition that they truly deserve! Share your favourite with others using the #LoveSpecies hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and tell them why they should vote for them too. Voting closes on February 14th at 23:59 PST (07:59 GMT).

Join us and our conservation partners in celebrating and raising awareness for some of the world’s most unloved species this Valentine’s Day!

Species: Great white shark

Nominated by: Australian Marine Conservation Society

Conservation status: Vulnerable

Why do you love it? Magnificent. Maligned. Misunderstood. The great white shark has traditionally borne the brunt of negative media attention due to its exaggerated threat to human safety. Fished to near extinction around the world, great white numbers have steadily declined throughout the world’s oceans.

Charismatic, elusive and far ranging creatures, great whites are apex predators at the top of the food chain, crucial in maintaining the balance in marine ecosystems. They are intelligent and powerful creatures, but gravely misunderstood.

What are the threats to the great white shark? The great white faces many threats in Australian waters.  Sadly, the main threats are from humans. Great white sharks are long lived, slow growing and have few babies, making them particularly vulnerable to fishing impacts. Great whites are also a target of cruel and unnecessary shark control programs. In some parts of the world, great whites are fished for their jaws, fins and teeth in the gruesome ‘sport’ of trophy hunting.

What are you doing to save it? AMCS was pivotal in getting great white sharks protected in Australia and we continue to promote them as a species in need of protection.

In the 1990’s, AMCS escalated its campaign as part of the global battle to protect these amazing creatures. Rallying huge public support, the great white shark was protected in all Australian waters and is now listed as a vulnerable and migratory species under Australian environment law.

We drove governments to improve Australia’s leading document on shark conservation and management (the National Plan of Action – Sharks) by including actions that governments around the country had to enact to better protect sharks and ensuring conservation organisations have a say in how sharks are managed and protected.

AMCS created Australia’s Sustainable Seafood Guide, for those who love the oceans and their seafood. Now in print for a decade, the guide is available in paperback, as a dedicated consumer website and smartphone app. The guide encourages consumers to avoid fisheries with bycatch of great whites and other species of conservation concern.

AMCS launched a successful community campaign to ban live shark finning at sea. We continue to work towards a ban in the export and import of shark fins in Australia, to stop our involvement in this terrible trade.

When the Western Australian Government announced the introduction of a shark cull, they were unprepared for the public outcry. Working with conservation partners, AMCS ensured those voices were heard in the corridors of power, and the shark cull was shut down. AMCS continues to campaign on stopping shark control programs in other parts of Australia.

Find out more about the Australian Marine Conservation Society

Discover more sharks, skates and rays on Arkive

 

VOTE NOW!

May 7

If you live in the UK and are a fan of sharks, then you are in serious luck! The BBC is launching a 3-part documentary series celebrating one of the most magnificent fish in the sea – the shark! It’s the first BBC series ever to be dedicated to sharks taking about two years to make, 2,646 hours underwater, 1.5 million liters of air, and having only one camera eaten by a shark!

For those in the UK who want to learn more about the sharks featured in the BBC series, why not use the commercial breaks to swim through Arkive’s extensive library of images, videos and information on several shark species. For everyone else around the world, let’s dive deep into the Arkive shark collection to explore some of the species that will be featured in the series!

The Movie Star

Great-white-shark-swimming-anterior-view (1)

Let’s start, with perhaps the most famous cinematic star of all time, the great white shark! While the great white is not a ferocious man-eater, it is however a skilled predator that often feasts upon turtles, mollusks, crustaceans and even small cetaceans. Also, they can maintain their body temperature higher than that of the surrounding water through a heat exchange system.

The Speedy Fellow

Blacktip-shark-at-surface-of-water-dorsal-view

As it name suggests the most distinctive feature of the blacktip shark is the black coloration on some of its fins. This shark is one of the more athletically built sharks with its torpedo-shaped body which allows it to easily cut through the water. It uses it agility to its advantage in swimming vertically through schools of fish spinning and snapping in all directions until it breaches the surface.

The Couch Potato

Greenland-shark-head

One could say the Greenland shark has has an affinity for frigid waters, since it inhabits the icy waters of the Arctic and northern Atlantic. Even though this shark is known for its sluggish movements, it still has a diverse diet that includes fish, seals and even cetaceans. An odd affliction for most Greenland sharks is a bizarre copepod that attaches to their corneas and overtime damages their eyesight.

The Night Owl

Female-whitetip-reef-shark-showing-mating-scars

 

This slender whitetip reef shark exhibits an almost Dr.Jekyll/Mr.Hyde personality shift, since it is relatively docile during the day, but becomes considerably more aggressive when hunting at night. While usually a solo hunter, this shark is not opposed to hunting with another in capturing prey such as octopus, lobster and crabs. To capture its prey, it sometimes chases them into a crevice and proceeds to jam its body in after it, thus sealing off the exit.

The Master of Disguise

Tasselled-wobbegong-anterior-view

The well camouflaged tasseled wobbegong hardly resembles the stereotypical image of the shark, since it possess a flat and wide body.  The wobbegong has a magnificent “beard” that resembles succulent morsels of food, which attracts unsuspecting fish toward its mouth. Its flattened body allows for great maneuverability in squirming into enclosed spaces.

 

BBC Sharks debuts tonight at 8:55pm on BBC One in the UK

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

 

 

 

Feb 20

Arkive’s Week in Review — Wildlife News  ICYMI: Arkive has compiled some of the biggest and most interesting headlines from this week.

Article originally published on Friday, Feb 13, 2015

Male black widows smell hungry cannibal females

Black-widow-female-showing-distinctive-red-egg-timer-shaped-markings-on-abdomen

Female black widow

Female black widows only eat courting males about 2% of the time. However, just in case, males can smell how peckish a female is just from the pheromones in her silk.

View original article

  Article originally published on Saturday, Feb 14, 2015

 Wildlife: Southwest wolf populations tops 100 for first time in modern era

Mexican-wolf-portrait

Mexican wolf portrait

The Mexican wolf population in New Mexico and Arizona has grown by 31% to  109 individuals total.

View original article

  Article originally published on Sunday, Feb 15, 2015

 Increasing number of stranded sea lion pups being rescued this year

Female-California-sea-lion-on-rock

Female sea lion

So far 185 sea lion pups have been rescued in 2015 in the San Diego area. Stranded pups are nursed back to health and once healthy released into the wild.

View original article

   Article originally published on Monday, Feb 16, 2015

 Cold-blooded animals grow bigger in the warm on land, but smaller in warm water

Velvet-swimming-crab

Velvet swimming crab

Arthropods like crabs and insects, grow larger on land in warmer climates. Moreover, researchers hypothesize that reduced oxygen availability in water causes aquatic animals to reduce their body size more.

View original article

Golden-ringed-dragonfly

Golden-ringed dragonfly

 Article originally published on Tuesday, Feb 17, 2015

 42 pangolins rescued…then sold to restaurant

Sunda-pangolin-side-view

Sunda pangolin

On Feb. 1, local Vietnamese police seized 42 live Sunda pangolins from poachers. Police handed them over to forest rangers who in turn ended up selling them to restaurants for a reported $56 a kilo.

View original article

  Article originally published on Wednesday, Feb 18, 2015

Grizzly bears are waking up too early

Brown-bear-walking-Alaskan-population

Brown bear walking

Grizzly bears are emerging from their dens a month early according to Yellowstone Park officials. The warmer weather appears to be the reason for the grizzlies’ altered schedule.

View original article

  Article originally published on Thursday, Feb 19, 2015

Great white sharks are late bloomers

Great-white-shark-swimming-anterior-view

Great white shark swimming

Male great white sharks take 26 years to reach sexual maturity. This differs significantly from the previous estimate that suggested that males reached maturity between 4 and 10 years of age.

View original article

 Enjoy your weekend!

William Lazaro, Arkive Social Media Intern, Wildscreen USA 

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