Jan 27

#LoveSpecies nominee: horrid ground-weaver

Nominated by: BugLife

Horrid ground-weaver spider

Why do you love it?

The horrid ground-weaver (Nothophantes horridus) is an extremely rare endemic money spider so called because of a corruption of its Latin name horridus which means hairy. A look at the spider under magnification indeed shows that it has a series of hairs or bristles sticking out from all its legs. It is just 2.5mm across, hence the need to observe under magnification. Until last year the only images available of this enigmatic little spider were a line drawing and a photo of a specimen in formaldehyde.

The spider lives in limestone cracks and crevices and is a nocturnal hunter across scree slopes most likely feasting on springtails and other small invertebrates. The IUCN added the Horrid ground-weaver to its list of endangered species in 2016 and it is probably the UK’s most rare spiders listed under Section 41 of the 2006 Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act.

What are the threats to the horrid ground-weaver?

The spider only lives on three recorded sites in Plymouth one of which has been developed into an industrial estate and another of which in 2015 was subject to a planning appeal for development. Buglife mounted a campaign to save the site, Radford Quarry, and were delighted when the planning inspector agreed to prevent development.

Many people who supported the campaign to save the Horrid ground-weaver were not spider fans indeed some were arachnophobes but they saw the importance of saving it – one supporter Helen stated on the petition “Not a panda, but just as important.”

What are you doing to save it?

After saving the site Buglife raised funds to study the spider which has now been found on a further site and we have also managed to obtain the fist ever photos and video of the Horrid ground-weaver in situ. All this was possible because over 10,000 individuals signed the petition and donated by a crowd funder. 2017 sees another obscure endemic under threat Fonseca’s seed-fly found on the north east dune scape of Scotland its habitat threatened by a golf course. Currently the only specimens of Fonseca’s seed-fly are in formaldehyde there are no photos.

Check out the Buglife website to see how you can help.

VOTE NOW!

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