Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) There are different types of plankton – phytoplankton (tiny plants) rely on the sun for photosynthesis, while zooplankton (tiny animals) feed on phytoplankton.

2) Phytoplankton are an essential component of life on Earth for both marine- and land-living creatures as they are responsible for producing up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe!

3) Plankton are unable to swim against currents, tides, or waves.

4) The word ‘plankton’ derives from the Greek word ‘planktos’, meaning wanderer or drifter.

5) Jellyfish are a technically a type of plankton.

6) During their larval stage, all fish are plankton.

7) Plankton can live in freshwater ponds and lakes as well as being found on every ocean on the planet.

8) Bacteria are the only organisms more abundant than plankton.

9) There are so many plankton in the ocean that if you added them all together, they’d outweigh every sea animal!

10) The famous White Cliffs of Dover are actually made up of millions and millions of fossilised plankton.

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) The lion’s mane jellyfish has been on Earth since before the dinosaurs – they’ve been floating around in the ocean for around 650 million years.

2) This species earned its name from its red and yellow tentacles, which it has up to 1,200 of, that are very similar to the colour and structure of a lion’s mane (see image below)!

3) It can grow to over 2m wide, with tentacles up to 60m long – that’s longer than an Olympic-sized swimming pool!

4) Jellyfish have to digest their food really fast – if they didn’t they wouldn’t be able to float and would be weighed down by their dinner!

5) In an extreme example of one-size-fits-all, a jelly’s mouth is also its jet propulsion unit (cool!) and eh.. also its bum (gross!).

6) Like all jellies, the lion’s mane jellyfish has no brain, blood, or nervous system. Hold on, does that make it a zombie?!

 

 

7) As if having some of the same characteristics as a zombie wasn’t freaky enough, jellyfish can also clone themselves! Being asexual, they are able to create both eggs and sperm so they don’t need a mate to create any offspring.

8) The lion’s mane jellyfish is bioluminescent, meaning it has the ability to create its own light and glow in the dark.

9) Every animal needs a nemesis, and the lion’s mane jellyfish has a mortal enemy in the leatherback turtle that feeds almost exclusively on jellyfish.

10) This may surprise you, but you can actually eat jellyfish, and it’s been on the menu of Chinese, Korean and Japanese restaurants for some time! With jellyfish thriving in overfished areas, you might see it slipping onto your plate more frequently in the not-too-distant future!

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) A crab’s shell acts similarly to our skeleton is but located on the outside of its body, acting as a suit of armour to protect it from predators.

2) Most crabs have evolved flat bodies, helping them to squeeze into very narrow crevices.


3) The largest crab in the world is the giant Japanese spider crab, which can measure up to 4m across! That’s one mighty big Krabby Patty!

4) Pea crabs are the smallest of all crabs, and guess what?! They are about the size of a pea.

5) The boxer crab of Hawaii carries a pair of stinging anemones in its claws as protection – feisty! Although they actually look more like a cheerleader than a boxer.

6) Crabs live in more different habitats than any other sea animal, found almost everywhere in the ocean from smoking volcanic vents thousands of feet under the sea, to underneath the freezing ice of Antarctica.


7) A crab may lose a claw or leg in a fight, but in time, the claw or leg grows back. That’s ‘handy’!

8) A crab’s shell does not grow or stretch. So when it gets bigger, a crack forms along the shell and then the crab backs out of it. The crab then has to wait for its new, exposed outer surface to harden.

9) Bromeliad crab mothers are so caring, they place old snail shells in the water around their babies to boost their calcium uptake so that they develop super strong shells!

10) If a male Australian fiddler crab’s burrow is being invaded by an intruder, his neighbour will leave his own burrow to help fight off the intruder. Everybody needs good neighbours!

 

Feb 22
Bermuda cave amphipod (<em>Pseudoniphargus grandimanus</em>)

Bermuda cave amphipod (Pseudoniphargus grandimanus)

Species: Bermuda cave amphipod (Pseudoniphargus grandimanus)

Status: Critically Endangered (CR)

Interesting Fact: Juvenile Bermuda cave amphipods are found far closer to the shore than adults.

More information:

The Bermuda cave amphipod is a colourless, eyeless amphipod that lacks a rostrum (a forward-projecting spine found between the eyes of most crustaceans). The upper lip is broadly rounded and the lower lip has large inner lobes. Male Bermuda cave amphipods are known to reach lengths of 6.5 to 8 millimetres.

The Bermuda cave amphipod is found in anchialine caves. These are coastal caves that are flooded with seawater via subterranean connections with the ocean. This species has been found in water of varying levels of salt concentration throughout a wide variety of anchialine limestone cave and groundwater habitats. Juvenile Bermuda cave amphipods are found far closer to the sea coast than adults, typically just 11 to 180 metres away, compared to 147 to 853 metres for adults.

Large adults, but notably no specimens carrying eggs, have been found further inland from the sea coast than juveniles. This could indicate a dependence on coastal marine habitats for reproduction, and that juveniles may migrate inland to mature.

The Bermuda cave amphipod is endemic to Bermuda, as its name suggests. Is has been recorded from wells, waterworks and cave waters in Hamilton, St George’s, Devonshire, Paget, Smith’s and Warwick Parishes in Bermuda. Caves in which it has been found include Church, Wonderland, Admiral’s and Government Quarry Caves.

 

Find out more about the Bermuda cave amphipod at Anchialine Caves and Cave Fauna of the World.

See images of the Bermuda cave amphipod on ARKive.

Phoebe Shaw Stewart, ARKive Text Author

 

About

RSS feedArkive.org is the place for films, photos and facts about endangered species. Subscribe to our blog today to keep up to date!

Email updates

Sign up to receive a regular email digest of Arkive blog posts.
Preferred frequency:

Recent posts

Arkive twitter

Twitter: ARKive