Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Sharks have been around for about 400 million years, long before dinosaurs even existed. They have survived five mass extinction events! Just keep swimming just keep swimming…

2) There are 355 confirmed species of shark, ranging in length from 15cm to 15m. Talk about little and large!

3) Hammerhead sharks are famous for their strange heads, which are actually designed to make them better hunters. The electrical sensors the sharks use to pinpoint their prey are spread out further, giving them much better prey detection skills.


4) Mako sharks are the fastest shark species in the ocean – these toothy torpedos can swim at speeds of up to 95km/h!

5) Lantern sharks can glow to disguise themselves in the deep ocean, and will emitting the same amount of light that shines from the ocean’s surface above them from their underside so that they don’t create a shadow. Basically, they have stealth mode – awesome!

6) Thresher sharks can use their super long tail fins to stun prey, similar to cracking them with a whip. The tail-whip also creates bubbles which can stun prey.


7) The babies of some shark species, such as the sand tiger shark, develop teeth in the womb and eat their unborn siblings. Sibling rivalry or what?!

8) A shark may go through over 20,000 teeth throughout its lifetime. The great white shark has up to 7 rows of teeth which are continually replaced with new ones.. yikes. Say cheese!


9) Greenland sharks are Earth’s longest-living vertebrates. Researchers recently discovered a 400-year old female by using radiocarbon dating.

10) A lot of people rightly avoid eating sharks, so fish markets and chefs change the name of shark meat to rock salmon, rock eel, huss or flake. Always make sure you know what you’re eating!

Sep 29

Thirteen ocean creatures have surfaced all around Bristol’s BS5 postcode, snapped by some of the world’s very best wildlife photographers. To prove how turtle-y awesome they all are, we’ve created blogs on all of the featured species sharing ten epic facts about them! Sail your way around the exhibition by downloading your very own map and guide.

1) Orcas are the most widely distributed of all whales and dolphins and are found in every ocean.

2) They are the largest member of the dolphin family.


3) Orcas were given the name ‘killer whale‘ by ancient sailors who used to see groups of them hunting and preying on whales, even the mighty blue whale!

4) The scientific name for orca is Orcinus orca. Orcinus translates to ‘of the kingdom of the dead’ and is probably derived from Roman God of the underworld Orcus, a reference to the fierce hunting reputation of this animal.


5) Not at all fussy eaters, orcas eat fish, great white sharks, rays, squid, crabs, lobsters, seals, sea lions, dugongs, seabirds, penguins, sea turtles and of course, whales. Quite the appetite!

6) Male orcas can grow to a maximum length of nearly 10m and weigh up to 10,000kg!

7) Because of the orca’s size, it is not preyed on by any other creature in the ocean, making it an apex predator – the largest apex predator on Earth, in fact.

8) Despite having such a fierce reputation, many orcas live with their mothers for their entire lives! Who doesn’t need their mums?


9) Orcas are very fast swimmers, and have been recorded at speeds of around 50kmh!

10) Orcas have developed many hunting tactics, one of which is to tail slap the water creating a tidal wave which knocks prey off of ice caps!

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